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I, Robot (2004) Poster

(2004)

Trivia

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The car used by Will Smith's character is a concept car called Audi RSQ, which was designed exclusively for the film and includes special features suggested by director Alex Proyas.
During an interview on American Chopper: The Series (2003), Will Smith told how he wrecked the motorcycle at around 60 mph during the filming of the scene at the robot storage facility (you can see him begin to lose control in the film).
For the character of Sonny the accused robot, the effects team used the same process that was used to create Gollum in The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002), with Alan Tudyk providing the body movements and voice for Sonny.
According to the credits, the film was "Inspired by Isaac Asimov's Book"; however, there was never an Asimov "book" (i.e. novel) called 'I, Robot'. A short story called "I, Robot", about a robot called "Adam Link", was written by Earl and Otto Binder (aka "Eando" Binder) and published in the January 1939 issue of 'Amazing Stories', well before the unrelated and more well-known book 'I, Robot' (1950), a collection of short stories, by Asimov. Asimov admitted to being heavily influenced by the Binder short story. The title of Asimov's collection was changed to "I, Robot" by the publisher, against Asimov's wishes.
No re-shoots were required, a rarity for a movie as big as this.
The motorcycle that Will Smith's character rides in the movie is a 2004 MV Agusta F4-SPR. It is one of only 300 produced worldwide. Its 750cc, inline 4-cylinder engine produces 147 horsepower and can propel the bike in excess of 175 mph.
Dr. Lanning's cat is named Asimov.
In interviews, both Will Smith and Bridget Moynahan commended Alan Tudyk for his brilliant work as Sonny.
Most of the cars in the movie are modified pre-2004 Audi A2, A6 and TT models. There are even some unmodified cars.
When Detective Spooner walks up to the garage containing the motorcycle, the code he enters on the door pad is 911.
Sonny's eyes are blue, while all the other NS-5 robots eyes are brown.
In the display window of an antique robot store is Sony's AIBO robotic dog.
In the theatrical trailer, Del Spooner (Will Smith) tells Lt. John Bergin (Chi McBride) that "I'm gonna miss the good old days", to which Bergin responds, "What good old days?" Spooner then says, "When people were killed by other people." In the film, Lt. Bergin says "I'm gonna miss the good old days" first instead of Spooner.
One of the many advertisements shown on huge outdoor flat screen TVs in the future is an advertisement mentioning the first manned mission to Mars. When Spooner is at Kalvin's house after Lanning's house is destroyed, Kalvin's personal robot is watching TV, the program he is watching shows some photos of Mars taken from that mission.
Will Smith hired Orange County Choppers of TLC's American Chopper: The Series (2003) to build an "I, Robot" themed chopper that was unveiled at the premiere of the movie.
According to the newscast, Dr. Alfred Lanning was born in 1971 and was 64 when he was murdered. Interesting enough, he was the same age at the time as the actor who played him, James Cromwell.
Wil Wheaton and Emilio Estevez auditioned for the part of Sonny the suspect robot.
The movie originally started as a screenplay entitled "Hardwired", a classical-style murder mystery that read like a stage play, and was very much in the spirit of Isaac Asimov's "three laws" mysteries. When the original "Hardwired" script eventually reached Fox, after being developed at Disney with director Bryan Singer, new director Alex Proyas and writer Jeff Vintar opened up the story to fit a big-budget studio film. When Fox acquired the rights to Isaac Asimov's story collection, Vintar spent two years adapting Hardwired to serve as a tenth story in the Asimov canon, complete with Susan Calvin and the Three Laws of Robotics. Hillary Seitz worked at one point as script doctor. Writer Akiva Goldsman came on late in the process to tailor the script to Will Smith.
When Sonny is drawing the picture of the bridge for Spooner, there is a piece of paper to the left with computer code on it. The code is that of a Renderman shader; a procedural description of a surface used to describe the robots' appearance during rendering.
WILHELM SCREAM: A random police officer when the NS-5's attack the police station.
Although "Hardwired" never got as far as filming, Geoff Zanelli wrote a main theme for the project.
There are two sheets of paper visible just before Sonny starts to draw the bridge. One is a "cheat sheet" of electronic formulas, and the second is a partial schematic of a vacuum tube based high frequency amplitude modulated transmitter, rather ancient technology to be concerned with.

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The idea of a robot hiding in a large group of identical robots comes from the Isaac Asimov story "Little Lost Robot", which appeared in the original book. Sonny's dreams in which slave robots are liberated comes from the Asimov short story "Robot Dreams", a sequel to the book.
The name of the other driver involved in the accident that cost Spooner his arm is Harold Lloyd, named after a silent film star who lost several of his fingers after an accident with a prop bomb.
Denzel Washington was offered the role of Spooner. Had he accepted, this would have been the second time he played a previously-married police officer with a bionic left arm who chases down a killer robot, the first being Parker Barnes in Virtuosity (1995).
The verse prayed by Spooner's grandmother at the end of the movie, "because he is at my right hand, I shall not be moved," is from Psalms 16:8.

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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