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The Return of 'Widow' Pogson's Husband (1911)

Bill Pogson works because his wife makes him, and she sets the example by her industry in running a very successful delicatessen shop. Bill is wont to stay out late at night and enjoy the ... See full summary »
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Cast

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Stebbins
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Mrs. Pogson
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Mr. Pogson
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Bill Pogson works because his wife makes him, and she sets the example by her industry in running a very successful delicatessen shop. Bill is wont to stay out late at night and enjoy the society of his boon companions. He does this once too often. Mrs. Pogson awaits his return and lays down the law to him in a very forceful manner. This Bill resents, and makes up his mind that his wife can very well get along without him, while he can maintain his independence elsewhere. He goes along the waterfront, where he throws down his overcoat in disgust. He is aroused from his meditation by the sound of a passing freight train, which he boards, and is on his way to any old place. A policeman passing along the wharf finds Bill's coat and a discarded hat, which he picks up. In one of the pockets he finds a letter addressed to Bill, and concludes that it is a case of suicide. He takes the coat and hat to Mrs. Pogson, who mourns her husband as dead. Her loneliness is somewhat relieved by the ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Comedy | Short

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Release Date:

22 July 1911 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

John Bunny og Enken  »

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1.33 : 1
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The comedy is wisely laid-out
26 March 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

The end of this amusing picture made even the ten o'clock morning audience at Keith & Proctor's Union Square house laugh; it laughed apparently as a whole. That scene was a fitting ending and it doubtless seemed very convincing to the audience. The comedy is wisely laid-out, but would have been a little more effective if, when Pogson started off, we hadn't seen him leaving the delicatessen store No. 1620. It happened that after a year or two had passed and the "widow" was being courted again, Pogson comes back to Brooklyn, and one of the suitors, not knowing him, hires him to burglarize the "widow's" house so that he can rescue her. Pogson enters his old house as a burglar, yet is surprised to find that the woman is his wife. The comedy as a whole is very amusing and commendable, and some of the scenes are very funny indeed. - The Moving Picture World, August 12, 1911


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