Brought up in the lap of luxury and indulged in extravagance, Jack Morrison is gradually led into a life of ease and idleness, from which his father tries to arouse and induce him to ... See full summary »
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Cast

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Mr. Morrison - Jack's Father
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Mrs. Morrison - Jack's Mother (as Julia Swayne)
James Morrison ...
Jack Morrison - the Son
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(as Harold Wilson)
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Storyline

Brought up in the lap of luxury and indulged in extravagance, Jack Morrison is gradually led into a life of ease and idleness, from which his father tries to arouse and induce him to interest himself in the large steel business, of which he is the head. Jack refuses to go to work: his father disowns him and tells him to leave the house. Jack's mother is heartbroken, and before her son leaves, gives him a rose, which is her favorite flower, and tells him whenever he is led into temptation to remember her parting words and the rose, indicative of her love. Thrown upon his own resources, he throws himself into a course of dissipation which soon brings him to disgrace and degradation. It is not long before he is entirely lost sight of, and his mother mourns him for dead, until heart-broken, she grieves herself to death. The wayward boy, unconscious of his mother having passed away, with a faint spark of conscience left, sees a vision of her and is prompted from time to time to write to ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Drama | Short

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Release Date:

4 November 1911 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

Miss Julia Swayne has given us one of her finest and most beautiful portrayals
13 May 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

The title of this picture suggests a story founded on some psychic phenomenon like telepathy, or some spiritualistic communication from the dead. In one sense, it does picture the communication as coming from the dead mother to reunite the obdurate father and the weak and erring son, but that interpretation is not forced upon us; what happens seems also like coincidence. The picture is very wisely conducted and powerful. The producer knew just how far he could go and carry his audience with him, and stopped at the right line. Ghosts never really "get over" as ghosts. The painting of the mother on the wall is shown as taking on an uncanny reality, but it is still a painting; the expression doesn't change (a weak producer would have made it do so), nor does it move. The rose falls by accident from the vase beneath it to the boy's feet. It was a rose from the mother's bush. The father that morning had placed it there, an anniversary offering. When the father, hearing a noise, comes into the darkened room, it is the rose in the boy's hand that softens him. In this picture Miss Julia Swayne has given us one of her finest and most beautiful portrayals. It is a fine success. The lad also succeeds in being boyish all through and his part is made unusually convincing. This picture is one of the Vitagraph life portrayals and it is worthwhile very truly. - The Moving Picture World, November 18, 1911


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