Comandante
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6 items from 2016


An In-Depth Look at Cuban Cinema’s Relationship With the Oscars During Fidel Castro’s Reign

29 November 2016 6:00 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

Fidel Castro (Courtesy: Jorge Rey/Getty Images)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

No matter how you felt or reacted when you heard the news, Fidel Castro’s death on November 25 shook the world. There’s no argument that the late Cuban leader definitely left a legacy, but what was the state of the film industry throughout his reign — and where does it go from here?

Castro was a controversial and revolutionary ruler who served as Prime Minister from 1959 to 1976 as well as President from 1976 to 2006 and turned Cuba into a one-party socialist state. Siding mostly with Russia (previously the Soviet Union), he largely opposed the U.S. throughout his dominion. In 2006, health issues forced Castro to hand over control of the country to his younger brother, Raúl. Raúl is the last surviving Castro brother as the eldest, Ramón, passed away earlier in 2016. Now, Castro has been cremated with little details about his death known. »

- Carson Blackwelder

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Watch Oliver Stone’s Controversial Fidel Castro Doc That HBO Wouldn’t Show

26 November 2016 10:02 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Back in 2002, Oliver Stone and his film crew flew to Cuba for three days and visited the country’s leader Fidel Castro for his documentary “Comandante.” The dictator, who died this past Friday, November 25, and the filmmaker discussed many topics ranging from his love life, political repression, free elections, among other subjects. 

Stone’s doc, partly produced by HBO, premiered at the 2003 Sundance Film Festival and was planned for broadcast on the cable network. Unfortunately, two weeks before it was supposed to air, the film was pulled after Castro executed three hijackers of a ferry to the Us and imprisoned more than 70 political dissidents.

“I was heartbroken,” Stone told the New York Times at the time. “Comandante” was never theatrically released in the states but Stone created two other documentaries about the Cuban President, “Looking for Fidel” (2003) and “Castro in Winter” (2012), which chronicles Castro’s deteriorating heath and position in Cuba. »

- Liz Calvario

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Oliver Stone Interview: Why ‘Snowden’ Is His Answer to American Bullies

9 September 2016 9:25 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Nobody owns Oliver Stone. I’ve talked with this filmmaker for decades, and he’s consistent to a fault. The Oscar-winning writer-director (“Platoon,” “JFK,” “Wall Street”) has always gone his own way. If there’s an impediment, he’ll find a way around it. Hell, he’ll even con the El Salvador government to give him army soldiers for a movie critical of El Salvador.

Which is one reason why Stone met with Nsa whistleblower Edward Snowden in Moscow, not once, or twice, but nine times. Stone will tell you: You can’t trust the United States government. You can’t trust the Nsa, CIA, or FBI. You can’t trust the Hollywood studios, because those are corporations run by lawyers. And you certainly can’t trust the media.

Related‘Snowden’ Trailer: Oliver Stone And Joseph Gordon-Levitt Take Down The Nsa

So who does he trust? His wife and kids. »

- Anne Thompson

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Oliver Stone Interview: Why ‘Snowden’ Is His Answer to American Bullies

9 September 2016 9:25 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Nobody owns Oliver Stone. I’ve talked with this filmmaker for decades, and he’s consistent to a fault. The Oscar-winning writer-director (“Platoon,” “JFK,” “Wall Street”) has always gone his own way. If there’s an impediment, he’ll find a way around it. Hell, he’ll even con the El Salvador government to give him army soldiers for a movie critical of El Salvador.

Which is one reason why Stone met with Nsa whistleblower Edward Snowden in Moscow, not once, or twice, but nine times. Stone will tell you: You can’t trust the United States government. You can’t trust the Nsa, CIA, or FBI. You can’t trust the Hollywood studios, because those are corporations run by lawyers. And you certainly can’t trust the media.

Related‘Snowden’ Trailer: Oliver Stone And Joseph Gordon-Levitt Take Down The Nsa

So who does he trust? His wife and kids. »

- Anne Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


Zannou, Gely, Morena, Mare Nostrum Team for ‘I Spit on Your Graves’

12 May 2016 11:08 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes —  Cyril Gely, scribe of Omar Sy hit “Chocolat,” is adapting U.S.-set thriller “I Spit on Your Graves,” the celebrated American race relations/revenge novel that made and killed -literally – French literary legend Boris Vian, a friend of Duke Ellington and Charlie Parker.

Set in a contemporary Southern U.S., to be shot in English,“I Spit on Your Graves” will be directed by Santiago Zannou, a Spanish Academy best new director Goya winner for “The One-Handed Trick.” Morena Films, producers of Steven Soderbergh’s “Che” and Oliver Stone’s “Comandante,” one of Spain’s best financed and most cosmopolitan of production houses, produces with France’s Mare Nostrum, headed by Alexandra Lebret, which garnered with Morena on Antonio Banderas’ “Altamira.”

Written in 1946, “I Spit” became a sensation when a copy was found on the bedside table of a strangled girl. France’s Catholic Church claimed that the »

- John Hopewell

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Mip TV: Mediapro Makes First International TV Co-Production Moves (Exclusive)

29 March 2016 3:31 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Madrid – Sporting 30 offices in 20 countries, and already Spain’s biggest rights broker and a high-profile movie producer, Mediapro, one of Spain’s biggest heavyweight TV-film congloms, is making its first moves into high-end international TV co-production as, like other big ambitious companies in Europe – think Lagardere, or even Spain’s Telefonica – it zeroes in on high-end contents as a major growth driver.   

Content represents “the major bet of the company for the next five years, where it aims to grow most,” said Javier Mendez, head of content at Mediapro, which also owns top Spain-based TV-film sales house Imagina Intl. Sales (Iis).

In early moves, Mediapro – which is headed by Jaume Roures and Taxto Benet and best-known as the co-producer of Woody Allen’s “Vicky Cristina Barcelona,” “You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger” and “Midnight in Paris” and as a long-term partner with Al Jazeera’s beIN Sports in and »

- John Hopewell

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

6 items from 2016


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