John Carr is discharged from the hospital cured. Through a friend, he secures a position working at the Public Playgrounds. Carr is a veritable "grouch." He is disrespectful to the woman ... See full summary »
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John Carr (as E.R. Phillips)
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The Child
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John Carr is discharged from the hospital cured. Through a friend, he secures a position working at the Public Playgrounds. Carr is a veritable "grouch." He is disrespectful to the woman who visit the grounds and worse to the children. When John Carr realizes what his ugly temper and disrespect for others means, his conscience asserts itself and he tries to make amends by a complete regeneration, which he gradually brings about, and we behold in him a changed man, no longer despised, kind to the children and with a higher regard for the feelings and authority of others. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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6 October 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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A story along new lines
23 April 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Carr's regeneration, or the regeneration of a "grouch," is a story along new lines. Carr is evidently a discontented miserable fellow, at odds with everybody; he does not seem to have a kindly streak in his nature, or a good word in his mouth. The story begins with him leaving the hospital, which he does in disdain, without a word of thanks to those who have cared for and cured him, snatching his discharge as though it were something he was entitled to and which was being withheld from him. Finding employment in a children's park, he acts like a bear among the young people, and is disrespectful to the young ladies in charge. A crippled girl is especially anxious to please and reconcile him, but he treats her with equal resentment; even when she tells him that the boys are going to resent his treatment by some trick, he angrily drives her from him. The boys, however, succeed in turning the hose on him, and give him a good drenching. About this time a young lady points out to him the rotten condition of the rope of the children's swing. Carr goes to procure a new one, but stops to "take a nap." Aroused by shouting he hastens to the children and finds that through his delay his little crippled friend has fallen from the swing through the breaking of the rope. This event strikes home to his conscience in so thorough a manner as to bring about his regeneration. Carr is now a changed man, respectful to his superiors and kindly to all the children, by whom he is soon regarded with great joy as he shows great big brotherly interest in all their games. The former "grouch" is now a generous, kindly soul. This is a playlet, the burden of which falls chiefly on the character of Carr, which is well sustained by Mr. E.K. Phillips well supported by Vitagraph talent. - The Moving Picture World, October 14, 1911


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