Capturing the Friedmans (2003) - News Poster

News

The Force gains, then loses insider access to an embattled police department

Documentary filmmakers who tackle current events need to be open-minded and flexible, following the story wherever it leads them. Sometimes, this results in a movie that bears little resemblance to what the director imagined when shooting began. (Most famously, the harrowing sexual-abuse doc Capturing The Friedmans

Read more...
See full article at The AV Club »

Critics Pick the Best Documentary TV Series Ever, From ‘The Jinx’ to ’30 for 30’ – IndieWire Survey

Critics Pick the Best Documentary TV Series Ever, From ‘The Jinx’ to ’30 for 30’ – IndieWire Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What’s the best documentary series you’ve seen on TV? Opening this up to past series, current ones, and those that you may have seen screeners for that are coming up soon.

Liz Shannon Miller (@lizlet), IndieWire

While we debate whether or not it technically counts as a TV show (certainly that Oscar it won would suggest otherwise), “O.J.: Made in America” was without question a seminal work, and one which owed a lot to its episodic structure while proving to be an addictive binge. Documentaries aren’t exactly my favorite genre, but “Made in America” was as gripping as any scripted series — and we have definitive proof of this,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Lodgers + 5 Movies About Family & Legacy [List]

Brian O'Malley's follow up to Let Us Prey is a gothic thriller about a crumbling mansion and the twins who inhabit it but The Lodgers (trailer) is also a story about family legacies and living with the sins, perceived or otherwise, of family.

In celebration of the movie's world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival today, we thought we'd look back at some of our favourite movies about family, most of them dysfunctional, and how the members of those families either dealt with or tried to escape their history.

The list is alphabetical.

Capturing the Friedmans

Talk about truth being str [Continued ...]
See full article at QuietEarth »

Jason Jeffers and Jonathan Ali, Third Horizon Caribbean Film Festival

  • ScreenDaily
Jason Jeffers and Jonathan Ali, Third Horizon Caribbean Film Festival
The founder of the inaugural Third Horizon Caribbean Film Festival and his friend, director of programming, preview this week’s event.

Jeffers, a Barbados native, musician and former journalist who founded the festival and also serves as its artistic director, and London-based Trinidadian Ali, a veteran programmer who has worked at the Trinidad and Tobago Film Festival and Toronto, believe the time is right for Third Horizon and its particular focus.

The event runs from September 29-October 2 and opens with Guetty Felin’s Ayiti Mon Amour (pictured). All screenings will take place at the O Cinema in Wynwood, Miami.

What’s the idea behind Third Horizon?

Jason Jeffers (from a note previously sent to Ali): Third Horizon came about from this sense, as a kid, that I had of the stories of the Caribbean and Third World being regarded as supplementary to those of the First World. We were bit players in world affairs and in
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Fortissimo Films Goes Bankrupt: 3 Reasons the Respected Arthouse Distributor Lost Its Groove

Fortissimo Films Goes Bankrupt: 3 Reasons the Respected Arthouse Distributor Lost Its Groove
Sales agent Fortissimo Films’ bankruptcy last week represented a major loss for members of the independent film industry that had worked with the company, based in Amsterdam and Hong Kong, for 25 years. A pioneer in the Asian and art house movie world, Fortissimo represented narrative films from acclaimed directors like Wong Kar-wai (“In the Mood for Love”), Tsui Hark (“Seven Swords”) and Jim Jarmusch (“Mystery Train”). It also handled sales for documentaries like Andrew Jarecki’s “Capturing The Friedmans,” Robert Kenner’s “Food Inc.,” Morgan Spurlock’s “Super Size Me” and Martin Scorsese’s “Shine a Light.”

Fortissimo was known for its impeccable taste that shunned mainstream titles, landing recent award-winners like writer-director Yi’nan Diao’s 2014 crime-drama “Black Coal, Thin Ice,” which won Berlin’s Golden Bear award, and Naji Abu Nowar’s adventure-drama “Theeb,” which earned Nowar the Best Director award at the 2014 Venice Film Festival. Though awards
See full article at Indiewire »

Tickled review – not as funny as it sounds

A compelling documentary begins with a lighthearted inquiry into the world of ‘competitive tickling’ and ends up somewhere much darker

A film that starts out as a whimsical little human-interest story, and evolves into a nerve-jangling conspiracy thriller. This supremely entertaining documentary follows New Zealand journalist David Farrier as he stumbles upon online film clips showing the phenomenon of “competitive endurance tickling” and decides to write a lighthearted feature about it. But the response to his request for an interview is so unexpected – a barrage of emails spit vitriol, legal threats and homophobic slurs – that Farrier decides to dig deeper. It turns out that sinister forces are at work in the world of recreational tickling. Like Capturing the Friedmans, this film takes us on a compulsively odd, increasingly dark journey; like Foxcatcher, it explores what happens when an obsessive interest and a taste for power games coincides with extreme wealth.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Fortissimo Films files for bankruptcy

Sales agent Fortissimo Films has filed for bankruptcy.

As first reported by Variety, the company filed for bankruptcy yesterday in Amsterdam, shuttering its offices in Hong Kong, London, Amsterdam and Beijing..

The sales agent began in 1991, founded by Wouter Barendrecht and Helen Loveridge. Michael Werner joined the company four years later and led it from 2009, becoming a partner in the company and producing films such as.Shortbus.and.Mysterious Skin.

Fortissimo specialised in the Asia-Pacific region and was increasingly run out of Hong Kong.

The company's library has over 300 titles, including Scorsese's Shine a Light, Wong Kar Wai.s Chungking Express, Morgan Spurlock.s Super Size Me, Sydney Pollack.s Sketches Of Frank Gehry,.Andrew Jarecki.s Capturing The Friedmans and the film that made a star of Jennifer Lawrence, Debra Granik's Winter's Bone.

Australian titles include Sue Brooks' Looking for Grace and Leon Ford's Griff the Invisible.
See full article at IF.com.au »

Sales Agent Fortissimo Films to Close on Quiet Note

Sales Agent Fortissimo Films to Close on Quiet Note
Hong Kong- and Amsterdam-based sales agent Fortissimo Films is to close its doors after more than 20 years as a pioneer of Asian and art-house cinema.

The company filed for voluntary bankruptcy Tuesday in The Netherlands. The filing was accepted by the court and notification posted. Separate filings need to be made for individual subsidiaries.

The court has appointed an administrator, known as a ‘curator’ according to the Dutch system. The curator will decide the next moves. These could range from a refinancing, to the sale of the company to a third party, or its breakup.

Staff have been informed of the situation by the existing management. The curator is expected to meet with the Amsterdam-based employees this week.

Fortissimo has represented titles by auteurs including Wong Kar-wai, Jim Jarmusch, Peter Greenaway, Tsai Ming-liang, Hal Hartley, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Brillante Mendoza, Tsui Hark and Pen-ek Ratanaruang. Its catalog spans some 300 titles.

With
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Denise Richards: examining her recent straight-to-dvd movies

Kirsten Howard Jul 19, 2016

From Blonde And Blonder and You Stupid Man, through to Edmond: we go through the recent straight-to-dvd films of Denise Richards...

So far in this series of pieces that look at the straight-to-dvd or VOD movies of some of our favourite actors who have fallen on hard times, we’ve only looked at men (to date: Bruce Willis, Nicolas Cage, John Cusack and John Travolta). That’s because, mostly, actresses find themselves almost completely out of the game once they hit 30ish – an unnecessary full stop that a lot of us would like to see removed in the future.

Denise Richards, sadly, is no different. After marrying a man she found herself in an abusive relationship with, her career climb stumbled and she was forced back down into TV roles, where she’s currently still putting in the hours.

Richards had a sparkling, American Dream-like start in life.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Jinx creators on Bob Durst, Serial, and their new podcast Crimetown

  • IF.com.au
(l-r) Robert Durst and Marc Smerling.

In 2010, director Andrew Jarecki and writer-producer Marc Smerling released All Good Things, a drama starring Ryan Gosling and Kirsten Dunst that was loosely based on the story of Manhattan property heir Robert Durst, whose wife Kathie went missing in 1982.

Though poorly reviewed, the film caught the eye of Durst himself, who offered the filmmakers an interview..

That sit-down interrogation became the basis for The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst, a six-part HBO series which premiered in Australia on Foxtel last May, and became watercooler fodder around the world.

Two of the show's creators are headed to Acmi for the Australian International Documentary Conference at the end of the month..

As well as founding New York's Hit the Ground Running Films with Jarecki, where he produced Capturing the Friedmans and Catfish, Smerling served as both producer and cinematographer on The Jinx..

He'll
See full article at IF.com.au »

Aidc adds to program, confirms full line-up

Robert Durst and Marc Smerling during filming of The Jinx.

The Australian International Documentary Conference has unveiled new sessions, rounding out the program for Aidc '16.

New talks include 'The True Detective', a masterclass with writer-producer-cinematographer Marc Smerling (The Jinx, Catfish, Capturing the Friedmans), and 'Aftrs TV Talks: Pick Me!', about the fine art of casting reality TV.

'Pick Me!' will be presided over by casting agents Kirsty de Vallance (Making Australia Happy, Life at One, Great Australian Bakeoff, Masterchef, The Biggest Loser) and Jodie Brearly (Gogglebox, The Bachelor, The Bachelorette, Shark Tank, The Great Australian Spelling Bee) as well as the UK's Roy Ackerman (Dream School, Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution, How Hip Hop Changed the World)..

'Virtual Reality: Documentary Outside the Frame' unites local and international innovators in Vr storytelling, including Astrid Scott (Senior Producer/Experience Strategist, ABC), Katy Morrison (Producer, Vrtov) and Jess Linington (Researcher/Producer,
See full article at IF.com.au »

Emmy award winning producers to headline Aidc 2016

  • IF.com.au
Emmy award winning producers, Marc Smerling and Zac Pointer are set to headline the Australian International documentary conference in February.

Smerling, cinematographer and producer, and Pontier, editor, co-writer and co-producer, of the HBO documentary series The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst will be keynote speakers at Aidc 2016 from February 28 to March 2.

Smerling.s production credits include All Good Things, Catfish, a 2011 documentary feature about the perils of social networking, and Capturing the Friedmans, (2003) winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival and nominee for an Academy Award for Best Documentary.

The Aidc has also opened earlybird registration for the event..

Pontier co produced Catfish, and edited Sundance award winner Martha Marcy May Marlene and SXSW award winner NY Export: Opus Jazz, He was awarded the 2015 Primetime Emmy for Editing and Outstanding Documentary Series for The Jinx.

Both Smerling and Pontier will be participating
See full article at IF.com.au »

Film Review: ‘A Family Affair’

Film Review: ‘A Family Affair’
As much as films like “Capturing the Friedmans” and “Stories We Tell” have taught us to expect the unexpected when it comes to family portraiture on film, viewers may still find themselves taken off-guard by Dutch docmaker Tom Fassaert’s fascinating “A Family Affair.” Alternately elusive and stunningly candid as it unpicks the Fassaert clan’s tangled, troubled history with nonagenarian matriarch Marianne Hertz, this deceptively artless, journal-style film has no need for any carefully sculpted twists; rather, it’s the sheer unpredictable perversity of human nature that takes the breath away at key points in Fassaert’s unsettling, perhaps unsolvable, inquiry. A low-key but imagination-snaring choice of opener for this year’s Idfa fest, “A Family Affair” requires deft marketing from arthouse distribs — teasing but not spoiling its nerviest revelations — if auds are to accept its closed invitation.

Midway through “A Family Affair,” Fassaert’s jumbled familial archive turns
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie Review – The Closer We Get (2015)

The Closer We Get, 2015.

Directed by Karen Guthrie.

Starring Karen Guthrie, Ann Guthrie and Ian Guthrie.

Synopsis:

Karen Guthrie plans to film a documentary about the tumultuous history of her family, but tragedy strikes when her mother suffers from a debilitating seizure early on in production.

Every family has skeletons, but while most of us would like to keep those in the closet, Karen Guthrie has chosen to air her family’s dirty laundry in the award-winning documentary The Closer We Get, an unflinchingly honest depiction of the devastation that secrets can leave in their wake.

From the outset, it becomes immediately clear that Guthrie’s family dynamic isn’t normal. Her mother Anna recently suffered from a stroke, prompting her divorced husband Ian to return home and become her primary caregiver, sharing duties with their four children. On paper, The Closer We Get sounds like a redemptive tale of enduring love,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Stranger Than Fiction: 16 Documentaries That Will Blow Your Mind

Stranger Than Fiction: 16 Documentaries That Will Blow Your Mind
Read More: The Crazy Five-Year Story Behind 'The Wolfpack' "Capturing the Friedmans" (2003) In the summer of 1987, parents in a quiet Long Island suburb got a rude awakening: Their kids' extracurricular computer teacher had been arrested for pedophilia. Immediately, disturbing stories began to emerge of children being forced into bizarre sex games in the basement of Arnold Friedman's home. But as quickly as the truth came out, the doubts crept in, and what ensued was one of the ugliest legal cases of child pornography the U.S. has ever seen. Andrew Jarecki, who most recently directed the HBO hit "The Jinx," was making a documentary about party clowns when he stumbled across David Friedman, son of Arnold Friedman, who shared his horrific story of family dysfunction, giving Jarecki access to private home videos the family had recorded during the span of the trial. The result is "Capturing the Friedmans," a harrowing exposé of epistemology that.
See full article at Indiewire »

The Jinx, Serial: When did true crime become so cool?

A year ago, if someone had mentioned that they were a fan of true crime, you might have sneered. You might have had images of cheap books in an airport Wh Smiths with gaudy titles, or perhaps of shoddily made TV programmes somewhere low down the Epg pecking order.

And then everything changed.

You couldn't move at the end of last year for people grabbing your arm and asking if you'd listened to the latest episode of Serial, a podcast investigating the 1999 murder of teenager Hae Min Lee and the ensuing case against her ex-boyfriend Adnan Syed, who was later convicted and imprisoned. Suddenly, true crime was cool again.

Now, there's a new player in the world of true crime. The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst - which had already aired to great acclaim in the Us - finished its run on Sky Atlantic tonight (it was already available on demand so,
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Why 1980 Was the Best Year in Movie History

  • Hitfix
Why 1980 Was the Best Year in Movie History
All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century. Click here for a complete list of our essays. How to decide in the grand scheme of things which film year stands above all others? History gives us no clear methodology to unravel this thorny but extremely important question. Is it the year with the highest average score of movies? So a year that averages out to a B + might be the winner over a field strewn with B’s, despite a few A +’s. Or do a few masterpieces lift up a year so far that whatever else happened beyond those three or four films is of no consequence? Both measures are worthy, and the winner by either of those would certainly be a year not to be sneezed at. But I contend the only true measure of a year’s
See full article at Hitfix »

We Were All Suckered by 'The Jinx' -- and That's Ok

You'd think people would be happy with the finale this past Sunday of HBO's docu-series "The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst," Not only did the six-episode true-crime drama end with the kind of neat apparent-confession that real life seldom drops into the laps of journalists, but the episode was preceded by less than 24 hours by the actual arrest of its subject on a murder charge related to the crimes discussed on the show. Viewers got a bang-up ending, and the victims' families finally get to see the alleged killer face a court of law. Everybody wins, right?

And yet, there's been nothing but handwringing over the ethical questions raised by the conduct of filmmakers Andrew Jarecki and Marc Smerling and the fortuitous timing of the arrest. Jarecki and Smerling taped Durst's seemingly self-incriminating remarks ("What the hell did I do? Killed them all, of course.") during a 2012 interview,
See full article at Moviefone »

We Were All Suckered by 'The Jinx' -- And That's Ok

You'd think people would be happy with the finale this past Sunday of HBO's docu-series "The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst," Not only did the six-episode true-crime drama end with the kind of neat apparent-confession that real life seldom drops into the laps of journalists, but the episode was preceded by less than 24 hours by the actual arrest of its subject on a murder charge related to the crimes discussed on the show. Viewers got a bang-up ending, and the victims' families finally get to see the alleged killer face a court of law. Everybody wins, right?

And yet, there's been nothing but handwringing over the ethical questions raised by the conduct of filmmakers Andrew Jarecki and Marc Smerling and the fortuitous timing of the arrest. Jarecki and Smerling taped Durst's seemingly self-incriminating remarks ("What the hell did I do? Killed them all, of course.") during a 2012 interview,
See full article at Moviefone »

Ryan Gosling on Robert Durst: ‘He’s a Complicated Guy’

Ryan Gosling on Robert Durst: ‘He’s a Complicated Guy’
As the press and fans alike react to the surprise ending to the HBO documentary, The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst, in which Durst himself mumbles “he killed them all” in the privacy of a bathroom, Ryan Gosling reflects on playing a fictionalized version of the real estate heir.

News: Robert Durst Says 'He Killed Them All' in Final Moments of HBO Doc

At SXSW promoting Lost River, Gosling was asked about portraying Durst in the 2010 film, All Good Things, which was directed by Andrew Jarecki -- the same filmmaker behind The Jinx. "He’s a very complicated guy,” he told the Los Angeles Times.

News: Why 'Serial' Fans Will Want to Watch 'The Jinx'

“Oh, boy. How can you know? You can’t," he said when asked if he thought Durst was responsible for the disappearance of his wife Kathleen and the murders of Susan Berman and Morris Black. "He either
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites