Mrs. Pearson is a little different from most mothers, at least in her general appearance, for she has that sweetness and calmness of disposition, which is characteristic of the Quakeress. ... See full summary »
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Cast

Cast overview:
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Mrs. Pearson - A Quaker Mother
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John Harmon - A Quaker Husband
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Lois Pearson Harmon - A Quaker Wife
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Tom Lester
Alfred Hollingsworth
Tefft Johnson
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The Harmon Daughter
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Storyline

Mrs. Pearson is a little different from most mothers, at least in her general appearance, for she has that sweetness and calmness of disposition, which is characteristic of the Quakeress. Lois, her only child, does not inherit her mother's sedate and quiet temperament, apparently she is no different from other girls, quite natural, and does not object to the attentions paid her by John Harmon, who is very much in love with her. Lois introduces him to her mother and her mother finds him not at all objectionable. It is not long before John and Loise are engaged and in the usual course of events, are married. John is obliged to go to Europe on business and takes his wife with him, leaving Mrs. Pearson all alone with her servants. She misses the company of Lois and her husband, and waits patiently and anxiously for their return. Several months later Mrs. Pearson receives word that John and Lois have arrived in New York from abroad, with their little baby and are stopping at a hotel and ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Drama | Short

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Release Date:

27 June 1911 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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There are too many introductory scenes
7 March 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This play is very truly a life portrayal. The Quaker mother's married daughter is about to elope with another man, but is saved by this dear old lady, who tells her that her little child is very sick and in sore need of her. The film is somewhat weakened by an unnecessarily lengthened preliminary statement; there are too many introductory scenes, some of them are not needed. But the moment that the situation begins to be portrayed by Julia Swayne as the young wife, the picture becomes very effective. The people will surely respond sympathetically to the scene in which the Quaker mother first meets the interloper. One doesn't see how he could help feeling like trash; in truth, he didn't meet her eyes. The situation is made to tell strongly by remarkable acting all around, and the play is worthy of high praise. - The Moving Picture World, July 15, 1911


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