Phil has redeeming qualities; one in particular, his love for children. This is very easily seen where the poor fellow in a railroad coach is being taken handcuffed to prison. In the seat ... See full summary »
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Phil (as Edward Phillips)
Florence Foley ...
Dotty
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Phil has redeeming qualities; one in particular, his love for children. This is very easily seen where the poor fellow in a railroad coach is being taken handcuffed to prison. In the seat next to the one in which he is sitting there is a little child, Dotty. The train stops, the sheriff, with his prisoner, leaves the car, and we don't see the convicted man again until we see him in stripes, working in the prison shoe shop, and witness his escape from the prison window, when he makes his plunge into the river and his long swim to freedom. The alarm is sounded and soon a sheriff's posse of hardy riders are on the trail of the escaped prisoner. Dotty, the little girl whom we met on the same train with the prisoner, starts out from her home to roam the fields. She loses herself. It is night. The child sees the man sleeping quietly and she arouses him. After recovering from his fright, Phil hugs the child to his bosom and pillows her head upon his breast and soon she is asleep. Out of the ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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5 July 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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There is no mawkish sentimentality here
9 March 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Here is a picture which stirs the emotions. It represents an escaped prisoner giving up his freedom to save a lost child from destruction by wolves in the depths of a forest whither she has wandered. The same child had given him a cake on the train when he was being taken to prison and he hasn't forgotten it. He is captured by the sheriff and his posse and returned to prison, while the child goes with her parents. The people join in thanking the prisoner and declare that they will endeavor to secure his pardon. It is well, perhaps, to call attention to the fact that the sheriff takes his prisoner back. There is no mawkish sentimentality here. He has transgressed the law and though he may have performed a brave and noble deed he must go back and make reparation. That the people will petition for a pardon seems perfectly right. The principle of justice, of punishment for wrongs committed, is not set aside, which is the important feature. Entering into the spirit of the picture it seems hard, yet it is perfectly just, and the teaching of the film is proper. - The Moving Picture World, July 22, 1911


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