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The District Attorney's Conscience (1912)

James Douglas, a rising young lawyer of reputation, is elected to the office of District Attorney. At his election he also announces his engagement to Phyllis Hathaway. After their marriage... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
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James Douglas - the District Attorney
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Phyllis Hathaway - the District Attorney's Sweetheart
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Little Billie
John T. Dillon ...
The Prisoner (as Jack Dillon)
James Cooley ...
The Counsel for the Defense
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Storyline

James Douglas, a rising young lawyer of reputation, is elected to the office of District Attorney. At his election he also announces his engagement to Phyllis Hathaway. After their marriage his first big case is that of a man arrested for murder. He sees a great opportunity to make a name for himself, and throws his whole soul into sending the man to the electric chair. His wife begs him not to convict on circumstantial evidence, but he laughs at her fears. The end of the trial draws near and his wife attends the summing up. While the jurors are out she discovers the prisoner's little boy and acts as his protector. Realizing the verdict will be "guilty" she takes the boy out of the room. When Douglas comes home flushed with his triumph she again pleads with him against conviction on circumstantial evidence. Her pleas and the boy present in his home shake his confidence but he passes it off and agrees to allow her to adopt the boy. Later when his enthusiasm grows cold he begins to ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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22 May 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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As though the illustrations of a newspaper had come to life
19 November 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A good picture, so well conducted in every way and so naturally photographed that it seems more interesting as a picture of real happenings, as though the illustrations of a newspaper had come to life, than as a work of art. Yet it doesn't fall down on dramatic quality; on the other hand, it is tensely dramatic. The few departures from the line of truth that a close inspection might reveal are leaped, so to speak by the inertia of the action. The struggle comes out of the district attorney's peculiar position. His reputation demands that he obtain convictions on evidence. Sometimes, as in this case, he feared this evidence was not conclusive, but it turns out so in the end. Mr. Henry Walthall, very well supported, plays the picture. The photographs are good. - The Moving Picture World, June 1, 1912


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