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Infernal Affairs (2002) More at IMDbPro »Mou gaan dou (original title)


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1-20 of 64 items from 2010   « Prev | Next »


Sammi Cheng and Louis Koo Joins Johnnie To's Romantic Drama

13 December 2010 6:00 AM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

It has been confirmed that Johnnie To will direct a new romantic drama film next year, with Sammi Cheng (Infernal Affairs) and Louis Koo (Triad Election) playing the co-leads. Johnnie To reportedly said that he wanted to make “pure love and romantic story” as his next project. He also hinted that it would likely include the participation of filmmaker Wai Ka-Fai. The film has not yet been given a title, but it was confirmed that shooting would take place in January and would be likely to located in Sichuan. Not surprisingly, he is currently involved with two other films projects Don’t Go Breaking My Heart (post-production) and Life Without Principle. The new film sees Sammi Cheng play a character, who is searching for sister after learning that she has gone missing in a forest of China mainland. During the search, she runs into Louis Koo’s character. And with his assistance, »

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Legend of the Fist: The Return of Chen Zhen (2010) Movie Review No. 2

12 December 2010 8:46 AM, PST | Beyond Hollywood | See recent Beyond Hollywood news »

One of the great things about being a Donnie Yen fan is the fact that he makes so many films, punching and kicking his way through several productions a year. “Legend of The Fist – The Return of Chen Zhen” is his latest, with him taking on the role of the Chinese folk hero, famously portrayed back in 1972 by Bruce Lee in “Fist of Fury”, and in 1994 by Jet li in Gordon Chan’s remake “Fist of Legend”. Having already starred in a TV version himself back in 1995, this time around Yen aims for something different, as he and writer producer Chan and director Andrew Lau (“Infernal Affairs”) take up Chen Zhen’s continuing story as a secret agent fighting the Japanese in the 1920s. The film is an all star blockbuster affair, with lavish production values and an impressive supporting cast headed by Shu Qi, Anthony Wong and Huang Bo. »

- James Mudge

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World Cinema: Franchises

8 December 2010 10:25 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Hollywood may love creating franchises, but other countries are partial to making them, too. This week, Nick takes a look at some of world cinema’s most enduring examples...

I decided to re-watch The Departed the other night (having not seen it since the cinema), and then for good measure put on Infernal Affairs afterwards. And it got me thinking, not that the former is the most successful (critically, at least) Hollywood remake ever, but that it came from a bona fide hit franchise (yes, I'm calling it a franchise and not a trilogy!) from Hong Kong.

Franchise films may be all the rage in Hollywood, and, in fact, the golden goose that studio heads are desperately seeking, but by no means are they the exclusive property of American filmmaking.

Franchises are a worldwide phenomenon, and have been for many years. To me, this is either proof that the idea »

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Legend Of The Fist: The Return Of Chen Zhen review

3 December 2010 1:31 AM, PST | 24framespersecond.net | See recent 24FramesPerSecond news »

Director: Wai-keung Lau. Review: Dan King. The hardest working “retired” martial arts superstar Donnie Yen returns as fictional superhero Chen Zhen! Chen Zhen has been played by Bruce Lee in ‘Fist of Fury’, and Jet Li in ‘Fist of Legend’, both actors and films being tough acts to follow. The combination of Donnie and Andrew Lau (Infernal Affairs) is a promising one, but the result is an entertaining yet rather average thriller. The martial arts element seems shoe-horned in as homage to the late Mr Lee, and lacks the power of Yen’s outings as Bruce’s teacher Ip Man. The film feels strangely dated, which one assumes is a stylistic choice but does not work favourably when the intrigue outweighs the action. The opening scene is explosive and fun and it’s a shame that half way through the film it was a distant memory. There is a resurgence »

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Legend Of The Fist: The Return Of Chen Zhen review

3 December 2010 1:31 AM, PST | 24framespersecond.net | See recent 24FramesPerSecond news »

Director: Wai-keung Lau. Review: Dan King. The hardest working “retired” martial arts superstar Donnie Yen returns as fictional superhero Chen Zhen! Chen Zhen has been played by Bruce Lee in ‘Fist of Fury’, and Jet Li in ‘Fist of Legend’, both actors and films being tough acts to follow. The combination of Donnie and Andrew Lau (Infernal Affairs) is a promising one, but the result is an entertaining yet rather average thriller. The martial arts element seems shoe-horned in as homage to the late Mr Lee, and lacks the power of Yen’s outings as Bruce’s teacher Ip Man. The film feels strangely dated, which one assumes is a stylistic choice but does not work favourably when the intrigue outweighs the action. The opening scene is explosive and fun and it’s a shame that half way through the film it was a distant memory. There is a resurgence »

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Legend Of The Fist: The Return Of Chen Zhen review

3 December 2010 1:31 AM, PST | 24framespersecond.net | See recent 24FramesPerSecond news »

Director: Wai-keung Lau. Review: Dan King. The hardest working “retired” martial arts superstar Donnie Yen returns as fictional superhero Chen Zhen! Chen Zhen has been played by Bruce Lee in ‘Fist of Fury’, and Jet Li in ‘Fist of Legend’, both actors and films being tough acts to follow. The combination of Donnie and Andrew Lau (Infernal Affairs) is a promising one, but the result is an entertaining yet rather average thriller. The martial arts element seems shoe-horned in as homage to the late Mr Lee, and lacks the power of Yen’s outings as Bruce’s teacher Ip Man. The film feels strangely dated, which one assumes is a stylistic choice but does not work favourably when the intrigue outweighs the action. The opening scene is explosive and fun and it’s a shame that half way through the film it was a distant memory. There is a resurgence »

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Srk to reprise DiCaprio 'Departed' role?

25 November 2010 11:51 PM, PST | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Shah Rukh Khan will reportedly play a policeman in a Bollywood remake of Martin Scorsese's The Departed. According to the Hindustan Times, Khan will play a role similar to that of Leonardo DiCaprio in the Hollywood film, which itself was a remake of Hong Kong thriller Infernal Affairs. Discussions allegedly started when Khan met with Scorsese and DiCaprio earlier this year (more) »

- By Anna Krahn

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Martin Scorsese: '3D is liberating. Every shot is rethinking cinema' | Interview

22 November 2010 1:31 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Oscar-winning director of The Departed, Raging Bull and Goodfellas, talks about his new 3D film Hugo Cabret, his movie-mad childhood in New York – and how directing HBO's acclaimed drama Boardwalk Empire opened his mind to the epic freedoms of TV

"I've always liked 3D," declares Martin Scorsese breezily, his brown eyes twinkling from behind the trademark black-rimmed glasses which seem larger (and more impressively varifocal) in real life. "I mean, we're sitting here in 3D. We are in 3D. We see in 3D. So why not?" He smiles at me like it's the most obvious thing on earth, his face alive with boyish enthusiasm (even though he turned 68 last week), his well-groomed silver-grey hair lending an air of statesmanlike authority. I smile back, my heart full of anxiety about the "future of cinema" in the post-Avatar stereoscopic 21st century, wondering whether my hero would look quite so imposing wearing »

- Mark Kermode

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Naughty is Nice: Sex Education and Cheerleaders Top 2010 Brit List

9 November 2010 2:15 PM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

The annual ranking of the best unproduced UK film scripts, this year’s list was just revealed this week. Eighty industry insiders were polled on their favorites; films such as Nowhere Boy followed by Jane Eyre were tops was tops in 2008, while 2009's List saw Good Luck Anthony Belcher grab the top spot which has yet to go into production, but films #3 (Now Is Good), #4 (Salmon Fishing In The Yemen) and #6 (Best Exotic Marigold Hotel) are currently in different stages of prod. Top of this year’s poll was Sex Education, written by Jamie Minoprio and Jonathan M Stern, who contributed to the writing of I Want Candy and both St Trinian’s films, which may be a clue to the tone of the film. Said to concern a schoolboy’s plot to take revenge on one of his teachers by seducing his wife, the script is being developed by BBC Films and Ruby Films. »

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Legend Of Chen Zhen Review

2 November 2010 6:10 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

It's been a while since Wai-Keung Lau released a crowd-pleaser with Western potential. His Infernal Affairs trilogy made a big impact, yet after these films he somehow slipped back into Hk anonymity. Those of you expecting a new gangster epic should take notice, Wai-Keung Lau is a diverse little devil who handles many different genres. His latest is a true Donnie Yen (14 Blades) action fest set in mid-20th century Shanghai. Talk about a change of scenery.

I've been seeing quite some Wai-Keung Lau films these last couple of weeks and while most of them are not good enough to warrant a review on this blog, his full body of work is proof of his diversity and ability to learn from mistakes. Earlier - often failed - experiments usually pay off in later films, The Legend of Chen Zhen isn't any different. Compare the martial arts in this film to »

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Chuck Hogan To Bring Whitey Bulger To The Silver Screen

18 October 2010 8:05 PM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

When adapting the Hong Kong film Infernal Affairs for American audiences, William Monahan looked to Boston kingpin James "Whitey" Bulger. Renamed "Frank Costello" and played by Jack Nicholson in Martin Scorsese's Oscar winning film The Departed, the figure was merely an inspiration for what ended up being a remarkable film. Now Chuck Hogan is digging in for the real story. Deadline reports that Hogan, who wrote the book that Ben Affleck's The Town is based on, has been hired by Gk Films to script a crime drama about the notorious Winter Hill Gang. Founded in 1950 by James "Buddy" McLean, the gang was was an influential force during the 1960s and 70s until 1979 when 21 members were tried and indited. The film will chronicle the rise of the gang and explore the relationship between them and the FBI Boston office. Gk Films purchased the rights to the story after chief »

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Joe Queenan's guide to crime cliches

17 October 2010 4:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Most of the essential, indispensable cliches in films about crime – the police are as bad as the gangsters, just try to find an La cop who's not on the take – were established many, many years ago, and films that ignore them rarely succeed at the box office. It's perfectly all right to add new cliches – feet seen descending from a car in a dark alley, protracted barfing when a mutilated corpse is found, wiseacre female assassins – but the old cliches must be honoured.

For starters, gangster films almost always showcase tough guys off the hardscrabble streets of blighted metropolises who turn to a life of crime because a) it is the only way to get ahead; b) they were wronged by the authorities at a young age; c) they realise that Credit Suisse and Bank of America almost never hire people from their ethnic background, so they might as well become leg-breakers. »

- Joe Queenan

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Warner wants Ray for “Secret” remake

7 October 2010 5:11 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

By Sean O’Connell

Hollywoodnews.com: Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: a major Hollywood studio is moving ahead on an American remake of a critically acclaimed, recently released foreign-language drama in hopes of expanding an excellent story to a wider audience.

No, I’m not talking about “Let Me In,” Matt Reeves’ remake of the Swedish vampire thriller “Let the Right One In,” though the box office failure of that miscalculation apparently hasn’t taught Hollywood a thing.

Instead, Warner Bros. is negotiating for the rights to Juan Jose Campanella’s Argentinean murder mystery “The Secret in Their Eyes,” which won the Best Foreign Language Feature Oscar months ago. “Secret” tells the story of an attorney haunted for decades by an unsolved case. According to the Hollywood Reporter, Warner wants “Shattered Glass” helmer Billy Ray to write and direct, shifting the story from Buenos Aires to the Unites States. »

- Sean O'Connell

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World Cinema: The other A-list

6 October 2010 9:22 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Hollywood A-listers may dominate newspapers and celebrity gossip magazines, but other countries have popular stars of their own, as our latest World Cinema column points out…

The Hollywood A-list actors are the undisputed royalty of celebrity culture in our society. Their star power exudes class and a better life all over the world. I still remember being in Kuala Lumpur and seeing the biggest advertisement hoarding ever on a busy street, displaying Brad Pitt's smiling face. It was terrifying, breathtaking and beautiful all at the same time. He loomed over the busy traffic on a main street like a beatific Buddha, blessing the populace below.

Anyway, I digress. The point is that, when you think of film star power, many people associate it with Hollywood and its stable of talent. And that would be wrong, as there are many movie stars globally who, in fact, can claim equal star wattage or even greater, »

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Billy Ray to write, direct 'Secret in Their Eyes'

6 October 2010 3:00 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Billy Ray will write and direct a new version of the Argentinian thriller "The Secret in Their Eyes" for Warner Bros., which is in negotiations to acquire the rights.

Juan Jose Campanella's 2009 murder mystery, which Campanella adapted from the novel by Eduardo Sacheri, won the foreign language Oscar in March. The film follows a retired criminal investigator in 2000 Buenos Aires who is writing a novel to try and deal with an unresolved rape and murder from 1974 that still haunts him. In the process, he re-encounters a female judge with whom he has a long, equally unresolved, history.

"The Secret in Their Eyes"   The original film has grossed $5.3 million Stateside since its April release.

Mark Johnson ("Donnie Brasco") is producing the new version, which Ray will re-set in the United States in present day.

"I want to try to make the movie that Anthony Minghella would have made from this material. »

- By Jay A. Fernandez and Borys Kit

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Twitch Top Kills: Sha Po Lang (Spl)

6 October 2010 10:00 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

At the time of release "Sha Po Lang (Spl)" was the most hyped film here at Twitch, and for a good reason. It marked the return of serious kick-ass action to Hong Kong cinema and proved to be a major come-back for its star Donnie Yen.

By the time I finally saw the film I was puzzled by all the accolades as I thought the story left something to be desired while the characters often devolved into caricature stereotypes. Frankly I enjoyed "Infernal Affairs" a lot more.

But, and that's a Major but, just when I started to fear "Sha Po Lang" wouldn't offer more than some decent craftsmanship and only some moments of brilliance, Donnie Yen gets truly unleashed. This leads to some of the most brutal and epic fights ever filmed, and the scene below is a good example.

Setting the scene: Donnie's character is hurrying somewhere to save someone, »

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Fantastic Fest 2010: Legend of the Fist review

5 October 2010 5:59 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

If the Chinese army had the skills that Donnie Yen shows at kicking ass as a lowly workman for the English in WW2, they would have ruled the world by now. Fortunately for us they don't seem to possess the superhuman abilities that he has in this film.

Taking place after the events in portrayed originally in "Fist of Fury", "Fist of Legend" and the TV series this film is based on we follow the character of Chen Zhen after coming home from the war torn battle fields of Europe to a city that has been sectioned down to territories ruled over by the allies and the Japanese. Posing as a suave playboy he fronts a revolutionary group that is determent to push back the Japanese army and get authority back in to the hands of the Chinese people. But things are not that simple because local gangsters see no »

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Fantastic Fest Review: 'Legend of the Fist: The Return of Chen Zhen'

3 October 2010 2:03 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Filed under: Reviews, New Releases, Cinematical, Festivals

At this point in cinema's history, I feel like a lot of the complaints both critics and audiences make about a lack of originality are kind of missing the point. To begin with (and depending on who you ask), there are only so many kinds of stories that can be told, regardless of the details that distinguish similar ones from one another. But more importantly, what people are typically focusing on is what happens in these stories, rather than how they are told, meaning how creatively, with how much technical competence, or even who's telling them, all of which are the real measures that distinguish remakes from originals, sequels from set-ups, and generally speaking, bad movies of almost any genre from good ones. And this is especially true in dedicated genre films, where quite literally the difference between a triumph and a piece »

- Todd Gilchrist

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Fantastic Fest Review: 'Legend of the Fist: The Return of Chen Zhen'

3 October 2010 2:03 AM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Filed under: Reviews, New Releases, Cinematical, Festivals

At this point in cinema's history, I feel like a lot of the complaints both critics and audiences make about a lack of originality are kind of missing the point. To begin with (and depending on who you ask), there are only so many kinds of stories that can be told, regardless of the details that distinguish similar ones from one another. But more importantly, what people are typically focusing on is what happens in these stories, rather than how they are told, meaning how creatively, with how much technical competence, or even who's telling them, all of which are the real measures that distinguish remakes from originals, sequels from set-ups, and generally speaking, bad movies of almost any genre from good ones. And this is especially true in dedicated genre films, where quite literally the difference between a triumph and a piece »

- Todd Gilchrist

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Aftershock review

2 October 2010 2:31 PM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

It's frustrating following Feng Xiaogang's transformation into the Chinese Steven Spielberg. This isn't innately a bad thing. He's still a talented director capable of doing astonishing things with moving images. It's just a huge disappointment seeing Aftershock come so close to being something extraordinary only to waste far too much of its potential on saccharine melodrama and nationalist chest-beating, with a climax which feels completely unearned.

Based on the Chinese-language novel of the same name, Aftershock was released to tie in with the relief efforts following the Sichuan earthquake in 2008. The film tells the story of a family in Tangshan, beginning more than three decades earlier, when the great earthquake of 1976 devastated that city, killing nearly a quarter of a million people.

The family become separated in the chaos following the quake, when a dreadful misunderstanding sees the mother, Li Yuan Ni (Xu Fan, One Foot Off the Ground, A »

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