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Depuis qu'Otar est parti...
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Since Otar Left (2003) More at IMDbPro »Depuis qu'Otar est parti... (original title)


Overview

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Director:
Writers:
Julie Bertuccelli (written by) &
Bernard Renucci (written by) ...
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Contact:
View company contact information for Since Otar Left on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 September 2003 (France) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
For a mother, a sister and a niece, nothing is the same . . . Since Otar Left [UK Quad Poster] See more »
Plot:
The one joy in the lives of a mother and daughter comes from the regular letters sent to them from Paris from the family's adored son... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
12 wins & 5 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Some kind of masterpiece: viewers of all ages and genders will be swept off their feet See more (28 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)
Esther Gorintin ... Eka
Nino Khomasuridze ... Marina
Dinara Drukarova ... Ada
Temur Kalandadze ... Tengiz (as Temour Kalandadze)
Rusudan Bolkvadze ... Rusiko (as Roussoudan Bolkvadze)
Sasha Sarishvili ... Alexi (as Sacha Sarichvili)
Duta Skhirtladze ... Niko (as Douta Skhirtladze)
Abdellah Moundy ... Le berbère (as Abdallah Moundy)
Mzia Eristavi ... Dora
Misha Eristavi ... Fils Dora
Zoura Natrochvili ... Voisin (Mika)
Alexandre Makhorablichvili ... Fonctionnaire
Micha Moudjiri ... Directeur usine
Jacques Fleury ... Homme d'affaire 1
Frédéric Payen ... Homme d'affaire 2
Manon Abacjodze ... Postière 1
Manana Taralachvili ... Postière 2
Irina Toukhoulova ... Professuer fac
Médéa Roinichvili ... Voisine
Iago Demetrachvili ... Père Alexi
Gotcha Darbaidze ... Otar en photo
Vaja Jalagania ... Photographe
Malamine Sissokho ... Chauffeur taxi
Sarah Chaumette ... Hôtesse de l'air

Directed by
Julie Bertuccelli 
 
Writing credits
Julie Bertuccelli (written by) &
Bernard Renucci (written by)

Roger Bohbot (adaptation)

Alda Engoian (translation) and
Gotcha Djavakhichvili (translation) and
Miguel Machalski (translation)

Produced by
Sébastien Delloye .... co-producer: Entre Chien et loup
Diana Elbaum .... co-producer: Entre Chien et loup
Yael Fogiel .... producer
Laetitia Gonzalez .... associate producer
Jana Sardlishvili .... executive producer: Studio 99 (as Jana Sardlichvili)
 
Cinematography by
Christophe Pollock 
 
Film Editing by
Emmanuelle Castro 
 
Casting by
Stéphane Batut 
 
Production Design by
Emmanuel de Chauvigny 
 
Costume Design by
Nathalie Raoul 
 
Makeup Department
Msia Kentshiashvili .... hair stylist (as Mzia Kentchiachvili)
Msia Kentshiashvili .... makeup artist (as Mzia Kentchiachvili)
Françoise Ben Soussan .... hair stylist: Paris
Françoise Ben Soussan .... makeup artist: Paris
 
Production Management
Reza Boirahmady .... assistant unit manager
Sylvie Caillabet .... post-production manager
Mat Troi Day .... production manager
Adam Marchand .... assistant unit manager
Jean-Philippe Moreteau .... assistant unit manager
Regis Saillard .... unit manager (as Régis Saillard)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Elsa Amiel .... second assistant director: Paris
Marine Kulumbegashvili .... first assistant director (as Marina Kouloumbegachvili)
Gabriele Roux .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Bruno Albanti .... assistant set decorator: Paris
Besarion Gelashvili .... assistant art director (as Bessarion Guelachvili)
Gia Laperadze .... assistant art director (as Guia Laperadze)
Virginie Noël .... set decorator: Paris
Mamuka Tkeshelashvili .... set designer (as Mamouka Tkechelachvili)
 
Sound Department
Thomas Gauder .... sound mixer
Aline Gavroy .... foley recording mixer
Olivier Goinard .... sound editor
Olivier Goinard .... supervising sound editor
Alex Hudd .... sound consultant: dolby
Xavier Marsais .... foley artist & post-synchronization recording
Henri Morelle .... sound
Stéphane Morelle .... sound assistant
Arnaud Rolland .... assistant sound editor
Arnaud Rolland .... sound editor
Philippe van Leer .... foley artist (as Philippe Van Leer)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Arnand Cousin .... electrician: Paris
Lucilio Da Costa Pais .... electrician
Eric Lesage .... electrician
Cyril Liberman .... camera operator (as Cyrille Liberman)
Olivier Regent .... chief electrician (as Olivier Régent)
 
Casting Department
Marion Touitou .... casting: children
Isabelle Ungaro .... extras casting
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Dolores Gonzalez .... wardrobe (as Dolorès Gonzalez)
Keti Palavandishvili .... wardrobe (as Ketty Palavandichvili)
Filippa Russo .... chief costumer
 
Editorial Department
Serge Anthony .... grader
Julie Delord .... assistant editor
Thomas Glaser .... assistant editor
Bruno Patin .... color timer
 
Music Department
Dato Evgenidze .... composer: song "Poissons"
Vladimir Spivakov .... musician: piano for Pärt's "Spiegel im Spiegel"
 
Other crew
Samantha Mialet .... production assistant
Maria Moutot-Tolomio .... location manager
Sandrine Pillon .... production assistant
Els Rastelli .... script supervisor
Rémi Roy .... administrator
Martine Vidalenc .... production assistant
 
Thanks
Jean-Louis Bertuccelli .... thanks
Emmanuel Finkiel .... thanks
Otar Iosseliani .... thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Depuis qu'Otar est parti..." - France (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
103 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Filming Locations:

FAQ

Is this film based on Argentine writer Julio Cortazar's short story "The Health of the Sick"? Plot too close!
See more »
21 out of 22 people found the following review useful.
Some kind of masterpiece: viewers of all ages and genders will be swept off their feet, 15 October 2003
Author: Mengedegna from Brooklyn, NY

Three women -- a grandmother, a middle-aged daughter, and a university-student granddaughter, live together, male-less, in Tblisi amid post-Soviet economic collapse. An occasional hard-currency bill shows up in letters from a beloved son/brother/uncle, who has qualified as a physician but is working as a clandestine laborer in Paris. The women snap at each other, manipulate one another, and confront life as best they can, each from her own perspective and unique experience. There is a large apartment filled with treasured bibelots and French books, and the suggestion of a more respectable, Tchekovianly Francophile pre-revolutionary past.

An image, among many arresting ones in the film: during a thunderstorm the power has gone out, as it frequently does in crumbling Georgia along with the water and the gas, and the apartment is lighted by candles, allowing the granddaughter to study and to be bathed in a kind of De La Tour luminescence. Then the storm ends, the power comes on, and the magic effect yields to harsh electric whiteness. The three generations peel off electronically: mother tunes in local radio to Georgian pop, grandmother turns on the black-and-white TV to watch a comfortingly boring Soviet-style newscast on a new dam (for her, order has gone and all is lost), granddaughter pops a rock cassette into her player and continues to study in a room suddenly flooded with a light in which everything seems more banal, including herself. Great stuff.

The dramatic anchor of the film is an extraordinary performance from the ninety-year-old Esther Gorontin. This is anything but a sweet old lady: she is misanthropic, querulous, petulant and willful, and when she and her daughter are not spitting and spatting, she immures herself in self-satisfied nostalgia, muttering in Russian (never Georgian) that things were better under Stalin. The beloved son is yearned for, spoken of and asked about compulsively, something that is ostensibly treated by her daughter as a tolerable quirk of age, to be humored -- but you can tell it hurts. Stalin and Soviet order are long gone, and son Otar's absence (which is far greater than she is supposed to realize) has left the other huge void in her life. The family's Francophilia allows Otar's experiences in Paris (which are shown to have in reality been quite miserable) to be lived via a romanticized vicariousness that is fed by each letter, always in stiff, old-fashioned French.

Language is an issue, both for Georgia and for the cast, since only the striking, Jeanne-Moreauesque Nino Khomasuridze, who plays the mother, is a native Georgian and speaks the language. Gorontin is Polish, but speaks French and Russian, as does the granddaughter Dinara Drukarova, who is faultless as a bright young woman who keeps much inside and, as the absent Otar puts it in a letter, "rounds out the angles" in the family until, as young people do, she suddenly explodes at her mother with all her long-repressed, Hamletian resentment and spite (and, as young people do, does this at the worst possible emotional moment). Drukarova learned some Georgian for the occasion, but Gorontin understandably refused to do so. Writing and managing the script must have been nightmarish, but the way in which the characters switch from Russian to Georgian and back depending on context and interlocutor seems entirely realistic for post-Soviet Georgia, and the use of French as a language of refuge and a bastion of dignity is in this context completely plausible.

The film will no doubt hold special resonance for woman viewers -- the depiction of a universe from which men are kept at a distance, and of the bitter joys of aging and of inter-generational love and tension is all done with heartbreaking accuracy. But Julie Bertucelli's first film is, with a lot of help from the tremendous Gorontin, some kind of masterpiece and should sweep viewers of all genders and generations off their feet.

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