7.0/10
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10 user 2 critic

Deacons for Defense (2003)

The words "Black Power" bring back memories of names like Stokely Carmichael, H. Rap Brown, and Eldridge Cleaver, but in Bogalusa, LA a group of harassed Afro-Americans had decided they'd ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(story), (teleplay) | 1 more credit »
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4 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Marcus Clay
...
William Chase
...
Michael Deane
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Reverend 'Rev' Gregory
Gene Mack ...
T.J.
...
Archie
Paul Benjamin ...
Otis
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Baily
...
Rose Clay
Serena Lee ...
Lucille Clay
Khafre Armatrading ...
Brooks Clay
...
Charles Hillibrand
Beau Starr ...
Neely
...
Lawson
Aaron Walpole ...
Jimmy
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Storyline

The words "Black Power" bring back memories of names like Stokely Carmichael, H. Rap Brown, and Eldridge Cleaver, but in Bogalusa, LA a group of harassed Afro-Americans had decided they'd had enough and took up arms to defend themselves and force the white power structure to listen to them. This took place during "Freedom Summer", 1964, right after the Civil Rights Act had become law. Fact based movie stars Forest Whitaker and Ossie Davis, the former as the founder of the Deacons of Defense and Justice (DDJ) and the latter as a peaceful minister trying to prevent the unavoidable violence that will follow. The story revolves around the white-controlled factory which provides 70% of the town's income and employees 40% of its people. Segregation is still clinging on within the factory, with blacks denied the supervisory positions and forced into separate lunchrooms, bathrooms, and drinking fountains. The Ku Klux Klan (KKK) has its strongest power in this area and, as the DDJ gets armed ... Written by AzRanger <Ranger273@azrangers.org>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some violent images and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

16 February 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A védelem diakónusai  »

Filming Locations:

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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

(2.0)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

[Some members want Marcus removed as leader of the Deacons]
Rev. Gregory: I have been living in fear of the Klan all my life. Was bred in me as a child, and it made me less than a man. But all of that has changed because of you. You freed me, son. You woke up something in me, so don't you stop. Don't you dare stop. And tomorrow, I'm gonna be marching with you, and I'm gonna march every day to change what's happening down here. And there ain't gonna be no change in leadership. Ain't gonna be no steppin' down. ...
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Connections

Featured in 10th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards (2004) See more »

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User Reviews

 
an important film that needed to be made
19 February 2005 | by (austin, tx) – See all my reviews

while we like to think of a world where violence is not necessary, there are times when one needs to defend oneself. this film mentions an important example: how is it that a man is allowed to fight against strangers in a war on another continent, and yet not allowed to defend his own family at home? we are still not where we need to be. i can think of too many examples of racism that i, as a white man have witnessed against people of color. we should not tolerate hate. one day i hope that understanding will conquer the ignorance that is the source of all hatred. this movie is a powerful reminder that we should not tolerate injustice. we all need to defend against those who allow violence to oppress.

we cannot allow the characterization of those different from us in the simplistic terms of being "less than" us. it is one thing to be proud of yourself, but as a race, as the human race, we cannot be proud of ourselves until we truly establish that one of us has no need to defend himself against another.

and this message could be just as easily translated into the way we deal with the difference in culture and religion between the west and the middle east. this film shows the true price of civil rights and reminds us that we cannot tolerate ignorance wherever it rears its proud, lazy, and ugly head.


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