Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
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A Note Regarding Spoilers

The following FAQ entries may contain spoilers. Only the biggest ones (if any) will be covered with spoiler tags. Spoiler tags have been used sparingly in order to make the page more readable.

For detailed information about the amounts and types of (a) sex and nudity, (b) violence and gore, (c) profanity, (d) alcohol, drugs, and smoking, and (e) frightening and intense scenes in this movie, consult the IMDb Parents Guide for this movie. The Parents Guide for Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire can be found here.

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2000) is the fourth book of the Harry Potter series, written by British author J.K. Rowling. The other books in the series include: (1) Harry Potter and the Philosopher's (aka Sorcerer's) Stone (1997), (2) Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (1998), (3) Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (1999), (5) Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (2003), (6) Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2005), and (7) Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2007). Rowling's Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was adapted for the screen by American screenwriter Steve Kloves.

This is Harry (Daniel Radcliffe)'s fourth year at Hogwarts. He began attending Hogwarts when he was 11, so he is now 14 years old. Harry affirms this when he tells reporter Rita Skeeter (Miranda Richardson) that he is 14.

Returning are Professor Albus Dumbledore (Michael Gambon), headmaster of Hogwarts, Professor Minerva McGonagall (Maggie Smith), deputy headmistress of Hogwarts, head of Gryffindor House, and teacher of Transfigurations, Professor Severus Snape (Alan Rickman, head of Slytherin House and Potions Master, and Professor Filius Flitwick (Warwick Davis), head of Ravenclaw House and teacher of Charms. In addition, we are introduced to Professor Alastor "MadEye" Moody (Brendan Gleeson), newly-appointed teacher of the class in Defence Against the Dark Arts. Gamekeeper Rubeus Hagrid (Robbie Coltrane) is back as the teacher of a class in the Care of Magical Creatures, as is Argus Filch (David Bradley), Hogwarts caretaker. We are also introduced to the headmistress of the Beauxbatons Academy of Magic, the extremely tall Madame Olympe Maxime (Frances de la Tour), and to Highmaster Igor Karkaroff (Predrag Bjelac) from Durmstrang Academy.

Muggle gardener Frank Bryce (Eric Sykes) sees a light in a country house at the Riddle house and sees three people discussing something in secrecy. Two of the discussants are revealed as Peter Pettigrew (Timothy Spall) and Bartemius Crouch Jr (David Tennant). The third discussant is not revealed; he is Voldemort in an artificial body..

Those were the Death Eaters, wizards and witches who are loyal to Lord Voldemort.

How is Quidditch played?

Quick recap of the rules of Quidditch: Each team has seven players: three Chasers, two Beaters, one Keeper and one Seeker, all riding broomsticks. The Chasers try to put the big red Quaffle ball through one of the opposing team's three hoops. If a Chaser is successful, his/her team gets 10 points. The Keeper defends his/her team's hoops. Beaters use small bats to hit iron Bludger balls at the other team's players. Beaters protect their teammates by making sure that the Bludgers are always heading toward the other team. The Seeker tries to catch the tiny and elusive Golden Snitch ball. When a Seeker catches the Snitch, his/her team gets 150 points and the game ends. Usually the team whose Seeker catches the Snitch will win, but they could also lose if the team is trailing by 160 points or more. What happens when a Seeker catches the Snitch with his/her team trailing by exactly 150 points (thus requiring a tie-breaker scenario) is unknown.

Ireland, as evidenced by one of the Weasley twins in the scene following the game. "It looks like the Irish have got their pride on," he says. In the book, Krum (Bulgaria's Seeker), decides to catch the Snitch and end the game, even though Bulgaria would not win. The final score is Bulgaria 160; Ireland 170. Krum knew that the Bulgarians would never be able to catch up to Ireland's excellent Chasers, and so decides to end the match on his own terms. In the movie, Krum is still praised by Ron for his excellent flying skills. All of this was probably seen as of little importance in comparison to other more important details that had to be put in the film, and so these Quidditch details were cut.

The Goblet of Fire is an old magical cup that spews fire for twenty-four hours before a Triwizard Tournament. Into the Goblet go the names of those students wishing to be contestants in the tournament. The Goblet throws out those which it believes to be the best candidates for school champions.

The Triwizard Tournament is a competition between three schools of magic -- Hogwarts, Beauxbatons, and Durmstrang -- in which the selected student from each school must compete in three dangerous tasks. In this year of the tournament the first task is to retrieve a golden egg from a dragon. The second task is to find and save someone close to the contestant who is chained underwater. The third task is to find and touch a cup placed inside a maze where the hedges are capable of attacking as the contestants attempt to reach it.

Viktor Krum (Stanislav Ianevski) is picked from Durmstrang Institute for Magical Learning. Fleur Delacour (Clémence Poésy) becomes the candidate from Beauxbatons Academy of Magic. Cedric Diggory (Robert Pattinson) is chosen as the delegate from Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Suddenly, the Goblet announces that Harry Potter will be a fourth contestant, even though he is underage.

There are four dragons: 1) the Welsh Green faced by Fleur Delacour, 2) the Chinese Fireball faced by Viktor Krum, 3) the Swedish Short-Snout faced by Cedric Diggory, and 4) the Hungarian Horntail faced by Harry Potter. And in case you're interested, the dragon in the first movie (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) was a Norwegian Ridgeback.

An Unforgiveable Curse is one that carries a mandatory life sentence to Azkaban Prison. There are three Unforgiveable Curses: 1) the Imperius Curse (incantation "Imperio"), which allows the user to totally control the victim; 2) the Cruciatus Curse ("Crucio") or Torture Curse, which inflicts horrific pain; 3) the Killing Curse ("Avada Kedavra"). In Goblet of Fire, the Imperius curse is used on Barty Crouch senior, Victor Krum and Harry, the Cruciatus curse on Harry and Cedric, and the Killing Curse on Cedric.

The Floo network that we saw Harry and the Weasleys use to travel in Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets can also be used for communication, if one simply uses floo powder and sticks his face into a fireplace.

No. At that point, Hermione (Emma Watson) and Ron (Rupert Grint) had not realized that they might have feelings for each other. Hermione went with Krum because he seemed like a nice guy who might show her a fun night. Also, it was clearly very flattering for her to be asked to the ball by a very famous and popular Quidditch player. She is just an unpopular bookworm who in hanging out with Harry and Ron never really felt like a "girl". This was a big "Cinderella moment" for her. She clearly did not expect Ron's jealous reaction. Furthermore, possibly in this book or a later one, it is revealed that Hermione turned Krum down twice because she wanted Ron to ask her, but after time passed she didn't want to wait any longer and accepted Krum's invitation.

In the making of the movie, the stylist said that a blue dress just didn't look good on Emma Watson, so they changed it to pink. Although some viewers claim that Hermione dislikes pink, this is not mentioned the book. In fact, at one point she is described as wearing a pink dressing gown. It has also been speculated that a blue dress would not have stood out against the blue background, hence the change in color.

Near the end of the movie, it is revealed that Barty Crouch Jr., impersonating Professor Mad-Eye Moody, put Harry's name in the Goblet. A Confundus Charm was then cast on the Goblet of Fire to make it produce Harry's name after the first three champions had been named. This was done to rig the contest so that Harry could touch the Cup in the maze and be Portkey-transported to Voldemort. In the movie, we also see Igor Karkarov suspiciously approach the Goblet, suggesting he had something to do with Harry ending up a contestant. However, this is simply a 'red herring', a deliberate suggestion meant to put the audience on the wrong foot.

In the movie: Come seek us where our voices sound / We cannot sing above the ground / An hour long you'll have to look / To recover what we took. The book's version differs slightly: Come seek us where our voices sound / We cannot sing above the ground / And while you're searching, ponder this: / We've taken what you'll sorely miss, / An hour long you'll have to look, / And to recover what we took, / But past an hour - the prospect's black, / Too late, it's gone, it won't come back.

That was Gillyweed. It caused Harry to grow gills, and to temporarily turn his hands and feet into flippers.

"Moody" was drinking Polyjuice Potion, a potion that allows him to take the shape of someone else. This did not attract suspicion because the real Moody was known to drink from a hipflask and only eat food he had prepared himself, because he was afraid of being poisoned.

This wasn't explained clearly. While Harry is looking for a way to breathe underwater, Hermione and Ron are summoned to the office. When Harry goes underwater to retrieve his most prized possession (Ron) he truly believes the words in the clue. He genuinely thinks that if he doesn't save them, the merpeople will keep him. He is so convinced that he stays there to make sure none of the other captives are taken. In doing so, he doesn't return to the surface within the allotted time and, thus, he fails the task. Because he stayed to make sure everyone was saved, however, he was given bonus points. Later, It was explained to him that Ron and Hermione had been told they would be safe; they were put in a trance to protect them underwater, and, when the task was over, they would have been returned. They made fun of him for thinking Dumbledore would let anything happen to them.

This is explained better in the novel. As his mother was dying, she wished to see her son freed. She and Barty Crouch Sr. went to visit their son in his cell, and by using Polyjuice Potion, they were able to reverse their appearances. Barty Jr. was smuggled out of Azkaban disguised as his mother while his mother stayed behind in a cell disguised as her son. They were able to pass the dementors, who have no sight, because they were both close to death (Barty Jr. because he had been Azkaban for so long), and the dementors couldn't sense a difference between the two. She died soon after and was buried under her son's name. The elder Crouch controlled his son by way of the Imperius Curse. A woman named Bertha Jorkins learned of this and also that Hogwarts was to host the revival of the Triwizard Tournament. She revealed this information under torture to Voldemort and Wormtail. No mention of this is made in the film, so perhaps the audience is to assume that the younger Crouch learned about the tournament from his father and relayed the information to Voldemort.

This is the most common criticism of the plot of both novel and film. It is never explained in either why one of Harry's books couldn't have been turned, for example, into a Portkey and sent him to Voldemort in that way, rather than entering him in the Triwizard Tournament and helping him in the tasks so that he would touch the Triwizard Cup-Portkey first. The most likely explanation is that Voldemort does not want it to be known - or even suspected - that he has returned to his corporeal form (i.e, his body). The unexplained disappearance of Harry Potter would place the wizarding world on high alert. The Order of the Phoenix would reform, suspected Death Eaters would likely be interned, and Voldemort would face an uphill struggle to power. But, as stated in the graveyard, he wants to kill Harry Potter in a fair fight in front of his Death Eaters to prove conclusively that he is the superior one. So, he must engineer a way for Harry to vanish, his body never to be found, with no one made to be suspicious. The Triwizard Tournament supplied this chance. The first task took place in full view of hundreds of people, so he had to wait. The second task would give him a chance, but he knew of Dumbledore's friendship with the merpeople; if Harry was kidnapped underwater, they would know of it and tell Dumbledore. The third task took place in a maze with no one present but the champions, so he could sabotage the other three's chances and be confident that Harry would reach the cup first. He hopes that when Harry does not return, it will be assumed that one of the various monsters in the maze killed and ate him. In addition, making the cup a portkey and cheating to ensure Harry was the first to touch it gave a higher probability of Harry touching it first and no one knowing who created the portkey than turning a random object into it. If this were to happen, then it would be difficult to ensure no one else touched it while at the same time preventing anyone from realizing Mad Eye created it.

Not surprisingly, the book offered more time to explain this than the movie. It probably stems from a combination of jealousy and disappointment. Ron may start to feel Harry's superior in every way: Ron is from a relatively poor family, Harry is quite rich; Harry is known and famous throughout the wizarding world, while Ron is merely notorious for being a Weasley; and lastly, Harry has become a much more accomplished wizard than Ron in the previous years. The thought that Harry is showing off by entering the Triwizard Tournament, and might even attain the greatest honour by winning, may be too much for him. But what is probably worse is the fact that Harry keeps denying that he entered his name in the tournament; no one seems to benefit from entering Harry into this tournament, so it seems logical that Harry did it himself. Since Harry is Ron's best friend, Ron would have trusted Harry to share this intention to enter the tournament with him, or at least admit it afterwards. Harry, on his part, is drawn into a dangerous tournament against his will, and now his best friend does not believe him. This drives them apart, although Ron remains secretly loyal to Harry when he indirectly warns about the first task. When Ron realizes that the tournament is really very dangerous, he believes that Harry would never voluntarily participate, and they make amends.

Who dies in this film?

There are several deaths in this film. It begins with the death of Frank Bryce, a Muggle groundskeeper who used to work for the Riddle family. A tailless whip scorpion is killed by Barty Crouch Jr., and Barty Crouch Sr. (Roger Lloyd Pack) is later killed by his son, Barty Crouch Jr. Finally, Cedric Diggory is killed by Peter Pettigrew on Voldemort's order (and using Voldemort's wand).

Voldemort and his followers rigged the Triwizard Tournament in order to get access to Harry Potter's blood so that Voldemort could manifest in a corporeal body. Bone of the father unwillingly given / Flesh of the servant willingly sacrificed / And blood of the enemy forcibly taken. In the novel, Voldemort acknowledges that the blood of any enemy would do, but Harry Potter's blood would confer upon Voldemort the powerful protection granted by Harry's mother. Voldemort shows this by touching Harry on the forehead without suffering; in Philosopher's Stone, touching Harry caused Voldemort great pain.

Harry asks Dumbledore about the spirits that emerged from Voldemort's wand during their duel. Dumbledore calls it simply 'Priori Incantatem' and adds that no spell can really bring back the dead. The book is more detailed about this. Dumbledore explains that, in the rare occasion when the spells of two wands collide, the wands can spill out some sort of 'recording' of the previous spells performed by that wand, in reverse order, a Priori Incantatem. In the case of Voldemort's wand, they are the images of the people he killed with the Avada Kedavra curse. Dumbledore also adds that the interlocking of two wands is an extremely rare event, which will only happen when the two wands involved are akin to each other; in this case, both Harry's wand and Voldemort's each contain a feather from the same Phoenix (Fawkes) as their core, making them "brother wands." In the movie, this last explanation is not given anywhere, leading the viewer to believe that this "locking" of wands could occur each time when the spells of two wands meet in mid-air. This does indeed seem the case within the movies, as the next movie (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix) and the final film (Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2) show unrelated wands interlocking.

How does the movie end?

With the help of those that Voldemort has killed, Harry escapes from the graveyard through the Portkey, bringing back with him Cedric Diggory's body. Moody confesses to Harry that it was he who put Harry's name in the goblet of fire for the express purpose of delivering Harry to Voldemort. Dumbledore exposes Moody as really being Barty Crouch Jr, escaped from Azkaban Prison. In the final scenes, Ron, Harry, and Hermoine prepare to leave Hogwarts for the summer, promising to write each other (except for Ron).

As was the case in the previous adaptations, subplots have been removed, separate events compressed and combined, and certain scenes drastically simplified to accomodate the movie's running time. The most important deviations from the book are listed below:

The book opens with a long history of Tom Riddle Sr. (Voldemort's father), and his parents, who were found murdered fifty years before in their stately manor. The Muggle villagers and the police suspected Frank Bryce, the Muggle caretaker of the house, to be the killer. As there was no clear evidence against him, he was released, but over the years, he was shunned by the villagers who did not believe his innocence. The scene where Frank, who still took care of the declining house all those years, discovers that there are intruders, is in the movie. The main differences is that in the book, Barty Crouch Jr. is not present; Voldemort only mentions an unnamed faithful servant, and that he killed someone called Bertha Jorkins. Upon detection, Frank demands that Voldemort face him like a man; Voldemort replies he is no man, but complies anyway. The 'thing' that Frank sees is not described, but it causes him to scream in fear before he is killed by the green flash of the Killing Curse.

The movie then cuts to Harry waking up at the Weasleys' residence. In the book, however, he wakes up at home with the Dursleys. He gets a letter from Ron who tells him they will come and pick him up for the Quidditch World Cup. However, they use the Floo Network and enter through the fireplace, which terribly upsets the Dursleys, especially since their fireplace is an electric-powered fireplace and was boarded up. Harry goes with the Weasleys to their home, meeting the older brothers Bill and Charlie, and learning that Fred and George have plans for opening a Joke Shop (despite their mother's objections).

In the Quidditch stadium, Harry meets Winky, a House Elf, who says she is saving a seat for Mr. Barty Crouch, her master. The entire Quidditch game was omitted from the movie for time reasons. In the book, Victor Krum grabs the Snitch, but this cannot prevent Ireland from winning with a 10-point difference.

While the Death Eaters are causing a stir, Harry is not knocked unconcious as in the movie, but he notices that his wand is missing. He also has a run-in with Draco Malfoy who warns him that the Death Eaters are coming for the Mudbloods. Harry does not see the person who conjures up the Dark Mark (as later revealed, this person was hidden under an Invisibility Cloak), he merely hears the incantation 'Morsmordre' being spoken. Unfortunately, Aurors locate Harry's wand at the place and confirm that it was used to create the Mark, so they have an even more legitimate reason for suspecting Harry of conjuring the Mark than in the movie. Then Winky is also found there, unconscious, unable to explain her presence. Crouch is furious and fires Winky from the family's service because of her disobedience. In the movie the Death Eaters chase the entire population out while destroying the camp site, but in the book they quickly Disapparate as Aurors arrive at the scene.

Harry and Sirius also correspond regularly in the book by owl post and Floo network, rather than just once. Sirius resides with Buckbeak in caves around Hogsmeade, and he meets Harry personally in Hogsmeade shortly before the second task. It is revealed later that he also remained in close contact with Dumbledore. Sirius appears in Dumbledore's office at the end as well, when Dumbledore orders both him and Snape to begin recruiting and spying activities on behalf of the Order of the Phoenix.

The personality of Barty Crouch Sr. is also changed in the film: he appears more friendly and compassionate compared to the book, where he is described as uptight, relentless and quite brutal in his methods for fighting the Dark Arts; he even sent Sirius to Azkaban without a formal trial. Crouch Sr. seems to care only about the success of his career in the Ministry and was at one time a candidate for becoming the Minister of Magic; however, his ruthless attitude towards his own son (a Death Eater) prevented him from ever attaining the post. After the first task, Crouch gets ill and isn't seen again until just before the third task, his place being taken by his aide, Ron's older brother Percy. In the movie, Crouch attends all activities that Percy attended himself.

Several classes are given in the book that were omitted from the movie, such as Care for Magical Creatures classes from Hagrid (where the students learn how to raise quite dangerous Blast-Ended Skrewts) and Divination classes (as always filled with grim predictions from Professor Trelawney that never come true). During further Defense against the Dark Arts classes, Moody teaches students how to resist the Imperius Curse.

There is an extended subplot involving Rita Skeeter, who publishes articles in the newspaper. However, she has the tendency to twist stories, put quotes out of context, and present gossip as fact, causing many wizards to be slandered and embarrassed, and Harry to become increasingly unpopular among the students. For instance, she discredits the Ministry of Magic with a story about the disappearance of one of their workers, Bertha Jorkins (no one had made a point of this previously, as Jorkins is known for her extreme forgetfullness). Hagrid is accused of being a Giant, creatures generally considered hostile by the wizarding world, causing him to hide in shame and him being substituted by Professor Grubbly-Plank, until Harry, Ron and Hermione convince him there is nothing to be ashamed about. Hermione becomes a target of hexed hate mail after an article accuses her of dating both Harry and Victor Krum. It is long unknown where Skeeter gets her information from, as listening devices don't work within Hogwarts. At the end of the book, Hermione finds out that Skeeter is an unregistered Animagus; she often listens in on others while disguised as a beetle (Harry did indeed notice the presence of a beetle during one of his overheard conversations). Hermione blackmails Skeeter by threatening to report her to the Ministry of Magic, if she keeps publishing unsubstantiated gossip. The final chapter of the book reveals her interviews from Slytherin students such as Draco Malfoy and Pansy Parkinson which helped with these slandered facts was due to them knowing her secret and that they fed her these facts while in her beetle form due to Dumbledore having banned Skeeter from entering Hogwarts after the First Task. Skeeter's role in the book also set up the plot for the following book through a article that cast Harry in a bad light, that caused Harry to be deemed as a unreliable witness to Voldemort's return.

While at Hogwarts, Hermione makes numerous issues about how the House Elves are treated at Hogwarts and in general. To improve their lives, she creates the S.P.E.W. - the Society for the Promotion of Elvish Welfare, in spite of the fact that everyone attempts (to no avail) to convince her that House Elves are actually very happy to serve wizards and witches. This subplot was never used in the films.

The Goblet of Fire is a wooden cup in the book. The Beauxbatons' girls all seem to be Veela, meaning they have the ability to seduce nearly every male at school, and their Headmistress Maxime is thought to be at least half-Giant like Hagrid (which she denies heavily).

In order to taunt Harry, Draco starts a hate campaign directed toward him while declaring Cedric the legitimate Hogwarts champion. Tensions rise, leading to a duel between Harry and Draco, during which both Goyle and Hermione are hit by stray curses. Snape intervenes, sending Goyle to the hospital wing, but, in typical Snape fashion, trivializing Hermione's injuries. Ron and Harry loudly object, receiving points deduction and detention. Mr Ollivander, the wand maker, makes a short appearance in a Wand Weighing ceremony where the champions' wands are given a check.

Harry and Hermione make a trip to Hogsmeade, with Harry under his Invisibility Cloak in order to avoid more snide remarks. They meet Hagrid and Moody in The Three Broomsticks, and find out that Moody's magical eye can penetrate his cloak. Hagrid invites Harry over in order to show him what the First task is about. In the forest, Harry notices that both Madame Maxime and Igor Karkaroff are there, so they can warn their respective champions. Since there is no one for Cedric, Harry decides to warn Cedric himself.

While figuring out the clue to the second task, Harry notices on his Marauder's Map that Barty Crouch is inside professor Snape's office. Which is most curious, as Barty Crouch Sr. was said to be ill. Harry hides under his Cloak as Filch and Snape come dangerously close to discovering him, but he is saved by Mad-Eye Moody, who can see him and distracts the others. Noticing Harry's map afterwards, Moody asks if he can borrow it. Harry agrees, and asks why Crouch was inside Snape's office. Moody suggests that Crouch was seeking evidence that Snape still practices dark wizardry (we learn at the end that this Mad-Eye Moody was, in fact, Barty Crouch Jr. posing as Moody with the help of Polyjuice Potion; so the Barty Crouch that Harry saw walking inside Snape's office was in fact Crouch Jr. in disguise, stealing ingredients for his Polyjuice Potion).

Dobby the House Elf returns in the book but was omitted from the movie. He gives Harry Christmas presents and is the one providing Harry with the Gillyweed. At the end of the book, Mad-Eye Moody (Barty Crouch Jr. in disguise) admits that he tried to learn Neville Longbottom about Gillyweed, hoping that he would pass the information to Harry. But when Neville did not act as expected, Moody/Crouch 'leaked' this information to Dobby instead. In the movie, the book's first suggestion is followed, and Neville provides Harry with the Gillyweed.

Another character that was omitted from the film is Ludo Bagman, an ex-Quidditch player working for the Ministery of Magic. He is introduced during the Quidditch World Cup chapters as a gentle and good-natured man who is very partial to gambling. Throughout the book he tries to give Harry some advice about the tasks to come, not in the least because he is betting heavily on Harry and hopes this information will help Harry winning. Later on, he becomes one of the suspects who could have put Harry's name into the Goblet of Fire, as Harry witnesses one of Dumbledore's memories in the Pensieve: this reveals that Bagman was brought to trial as a suspected Death Eater. However, due to his naive nature, he had merely passed information to an acquaintance, not knowing that the man was a Death Eater, so he is quickly acquitted. Bagman is also involved in a lengthy subplot with Fred and George, who bet all their savings on the outcome of the Quidditch World Cup and won, but were paid in leprechaun gold (which vanishes eventually). It is eventually revealed he had his gold taken by a group of goblins to whom he was in debt, and so bet on Harry to win the Triwizard Tournament, offering him illegal advice wherever possible.

In the movie, Crouch Sr. is found dead just prior to the Third Task, but in the book, Harry and Victor Krum find him walking the grounds, deliriously asking to see Dumbledore. Harry goes to get Dumbledore, but as they return, Crouch is gone and Krum claims that Crouch Sr. stunned him before escaping.

Before Harry's look in the Pensieve, he has a dream during Divination class of Voldemort torturing Wormtail for 'almost ruining everything'. He then proceeds to Dumbledore's office to tell about the dream. Dumbledore's Pensieve also shows the first appearance of Bellatrix Lestrange (although not identified by name), a character mentioned in the previous book (her first appearance on film is in the next movie). She and her husband are extremely devoted Death Eaters who, unlike most others, proudly boast their allegiance and loyalty to Voldemort and make no effort to hide their crimes, which earns them a life sentence in Azkaban prison (where the husband eventually died).

Barty Crouch Jr.'s presence is not revealed until the final part of the book. He is merely mentioned as having died at Azkaban, and not seen until Harry's peek in Dumbledore's Pensieve. In that memory, he has already been caught as a Death Eater and is brought to trial together with Bellatrix and her husband. In the book he largely maintains his innocence (contrary to the film), even begging his father for leniency. Dumbledore comments that Crouch Jr was given a life sentence, even though his guilt was never unquestionably proven (in the movie, there was plenty of evidence for his guilt). He is eventually discovered to be impersonating Mad-Eye Moody, just as in the movie. In the book, he explains under influence of Veritaserum how it was his mother's dying wish to see her son released from prison. So the two switched places in Azkaban using Polyjuice Potion, with Crouch Jr., leaving prison with his father, disguised as his mother. The mother soon died, disguised and buried as her son. Crouch Sr. kept his son hidden and controlled him by means of the Imperius curse, together with Winky, his house elf. Winky was supposed to keep an eye on the invisible Crouch Jr. during the Quidditch Cup, but in the chaos, she lost him out of her sight; he stole Harry's wand and created the Dark Mark. Prior to the Quidditch Cup, Bertha Jorkins, the disappeared witch, had find out about Crouch Jr. being alive, but she was captured and tortured for information by Voldemort and Wormtail, who learnt of the Triwizard Tournament and Crouch Jr.'s situation. They broke the curse, kidnapped Moody and replaced him with Crouch Jr. When Sr. found out about his son's escape, Wormtail kept him under the Imperius curse, stating he was ill. However, Crouch Sr. eventually broke the curse, escaped and tried to warn Dumbledore at Hogwarts, but his son saw him on the recently procured Marauder's Map, stunned Krum and killed his own father, transfiguring the body into a bone (Harry witnessed Wormtail receiving punishment for this in his dream). The movie drastically simplifies this backstory: Crouch Sr. wasn't even aware that his son had escaped Azkaban; he was found dead after he discovered his son was impersonating Moody (due to the flickering of his tongue which Crouch Sr. recognized that only his son could do). The movie does not offer any explanation for his escape from Azkaban, only implying that he got out unnoticed.

The maze in the Third Task contains a lot more dangers, such as Blast-Ended Skrewts, magical illusions, Boggarts and a Sphinx; Harry saves Cedric from a giant spider which injures his leg, prompting Cedric to share the victory by simultaneously grasping the Triwizard Cup.

Voldemort appears as something of a horrible cross between an infant and a snake before his resurrection to a full body. He seems even more disappointed in the book with his Death Eaters than in the movie, using the Cruciatus Curse on one of them for his lack of loyalty following Voldemort's downfall. He mentions all those who have died for him, specifically stressing the absence of the Lestranges in the graveyard, calling them his only true followers for not denouncing him when they were caught. He explains how he became a ghost after trying to kill Harry, forced to survive by possessing animals, until he was finally able to possess Professor Quirrell prior to Harry's first year. During the duel, the beams from the wands merge into one golden beam, and Harry and Voldemort are lifted up and placed elsewhere in the graveyard before the dome forms. Harry hears a Phoenix singing that he must maintain the wand connection; also, the Priori Incantatem effect causes the ghost of Bertha Jorkins to emerge prior to Harry's mother.

In his office, Dumbledore explains that when the spells of two 'brother wands' meet, one of them will be forced to recall the last couple of spells produced, the Priori Incantatem effect. This happened since Harry and Voldemort's wand both contain a feather from the same Phoenix. The Minister of Magic comes to Hogwarts together with a Dementor to interrogate Barty Crouch Jr. further, but the Dementor immediately performs a Dementor's Kiss on Crouch Jr., leaving him for dead and unable to attest to Voldemort's return. This is followed by a discussion between Dumbledore and Cornelius Fudge, the latter not believing Harry's claim that Voldemort has returned in corporeal form due to Rita Skeeter's article. This leads to a schism between Dumbledore and the Ministry of Magic, which features prominently in the next book and film.

Harry has a difficult meeting with Cedric's parents, who show him their gratitude for bringing back Cedric's body. Dumbledore urges Harry to go back to the Dursleys despite an invitation to stay with the Weasley family (the reason being explained in the next book). Draco, Crabbe and Goyle confront Harry, confirming Voldemort's return and making threats, but Harry responds by hexing them, together with Ron, Hermione, Fred and George. Harry gives the price money from winning the Tournament to Fred and George, so they can finally open their Joke Shop.

A Defence Against the Dark Arts class is shown in which Moody teaches the students about the Unforgiveable Curses. A dancing class is shown where McGonagall teaches the students how to waltz.

Those are the same obstacles which the champions face in The Maze as it's presented in the book. The whole concept of The Maze was drastically altered for the film, including what sort of obstacles it would present.

The Weird Sisters, a play on the name of the 3 witches (Wyrd Sisters) from Shakespeare's MacBeth.

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