Around the World in 80 Days
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No. For the most part this is a film that draws loose inspiration from the Verne novel. A more faithful adaptation was made in 1956.

To name a few specific and obvious changes from the novel:

-In the film, Phileas Fog is an eccentric inventer who takes a bet for a position of auhority. In the book he was a recluse who spent most of his time playing cards and the bet was simply a sum of money.

-Passpartout in the book was much more open with Fog. He was being honest when he said he was French, and there was no sub-plot about him taking advantage of Fog to achieve a hidden agenda. Also in the film he is responsible for the bank robbery, despite having nothing to do with it in the book.

-While the bank robbery did happen in the book, it is given a larger role and serves as motivation for the characters. Lord Kelvin also pins it on Fog as an excuse to keep him from winning the bet. In the book, the robbery happened of-screen and had nothing to do the main characters. Inspector Fix only mistook Fog for the robber because his appearance matched the description he had been given of the actual criminal.

-In the film, Inspector Fix is depicted as a dim-witted officer who is manipulated by Kelvin. In the book, he was much more reasonable, having mistaken Fog for the robber based on his appearance matching the description. He also eventually helps Fog and releases him when he realizes his mistake.

-The love interest in the book was an Indian princess, not a French artist.

Page last updated by john-hitchcock, 1 year ago
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