5.8/10
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Around the World in 80 Days (2004)

To win a bet, an eccentric British inventor beside his Chinese valet and an aspiring French artist, embarks on a trip full of adventures and dangers around the world in exactly 80 days.

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Writers:

(novel), (screenplay) (as David Titcher) | 2 more credits »
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3,678 ( 1,243)

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Howard Cooper ...
Academy Member #1
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General Fang (as Karen Joy Morris)
Daniel Hinchcliffe ...
British Valet
Wolfram Teufel ...
Belgian Dignitary
Tom Strauss ...
Academy Member #2
Kit West ...
Academy Member #3
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Storyline

Set in 1890, the story focuses on Passepartout, a Chinese thief who steals a valuable jade Buddha and then seeks refuge in the traveling companionship of an eccentric London inventor and adventurer, Phileas Fogg, who has taken on a bet with members of his gentlemen's club that he can make it around the world in a mere 80 days, using a variety of means of transportation, like boats, trains, balloons, elephants, etc. Along the way, Passepartout uses his amazing martial arts abilities to defend Fogg from the many dangers they face.. One major threat to their adventure is a detective that's following them. Why? Just as Fogg and Passeportout left London, a major bank was robbed, with Fogg suspected of using the "around the world" trip as an excuse to escape.. Their path from London and back includes stops in Paris, Turkey, India, China and USA. Written by austin4577@aol.com

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Let your imagination soar. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for action violence, some crude humor and mild language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

16 June 2004 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Around the World in Eighty Days  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$110,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$7,576,132 (USA) (18 June 2004)

Gross:

$24,004,159 (USA) (10 September 2004)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Frank Coraci: as the angry man that Fogg confronts in San Francisco while asking for money. See more »

Goofs

On the paddle-ship on the Atlantic, the paddles are turning and some of the sails are also unfurled. However if the wind was having any effect it would have to be going faster than the ship. In that case the smoke from the smokestack should be blown forward, in the direction of travel. In fact it is shown going sideways or even backwards; this implies that the sails are actually causing a drag on the ship, slowing it down. See more »

Quotes

Prince Hapi: You two men may leave but Miss La Roche stays here.
Phileas Fogg: Why does she stay?
Prince Hapi: She will be my wife. One of seven.
Monique La Roche: Surprised. You have seven wives?
Prince Hapi: One for every day of the week. Do Tuesdays work for you?
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Connections

Referenced in Unikal'noe pozdravlenie (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Sehnaz Pesrev
Ud - Nurk Karademirli
Kanun - Önder Kiran
Kemenge - Aspa Anojati
Ney - Jorgos Psirakis
Bendir - Matthias Bautz
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Three Screenwriters Named Dave
16 June 2004 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

The credits roll, and I sarcastically turn to my friend, and whisper, "Dude, 3 screenwriters, and they're all named Dave."

Oddly enough, that turned out to pretty much sum up the whole movie.

It's not BAD. It leans toward good, except it's not so much a remake as it is a Disney-fication. Like 'Cinderella' and 'The Little Mermaid' before it, Disney takes the title of the story and a few major characters, and just turns it into a theme-park attraction with emotional and dramatic resonance to match.

Frank Coraci is solely responsible for making Adam Sandler's star stick. "Happy Gilmore" was cute, but it didn't have the style of a REAL movie, like his two films with Coraci, "The Wedding Singer," and "The Waterboy." Those films work as FILMS, not just Adam Sandler vehicles.

I had high hopes for this one, and for that reason, it splatted. Amusing lines here and there, and great kung-fu choreography ruined by the same poor photography that screwed up "Rush Hour." This is martial arts. DO NOT shoot your actors from the waist up. Things happen too fast, people are moving in too many directions. So in "80 Days," like in "Rush Hour," I had a sense that there was martial arts taking place, but could barely see it. Coraci does pull the camera back a few times, down to the ankles maybe, so a few scenes are reasonably well-shot. But not as well as they could have been. In fact, the entire movie feels rushed, like they're trying to cram the whole script into the alotted time frame. Some "Indiana Jones"-type pacing would have worked wonders, even if it made the movie 30 minutes longer. We're still talking about the book 100 years later for a reason, you know.

What could have been fun for everyone turns into Disney-video wackiness that will barely appeal to anyone over 13, and not at all to any fan of Jules Verne. And thus the old rule applies once again.... the more screenwriters, the worse the film. Even if they're all named Dave.


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