The Stepford Wives
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 33 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Blade Runner 2049 Has a Woman Problem

8 October 2017 2:42 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

After a 35 year wait filled with seemingly endless new edits and versions of the original cinema classic, movie audiences were finally able to return to the futuristic noir dystopia of Blade Runner. Film critics have rightly marveled at the visual achievement of the two hour and 43 minute long Blade Runner 2049, which pairs Ryan Gosling with original star Harrison Ford in a new tale about human replicants.

But even with the elegant and immersive score, cinematography, solid casting, and direction from Denis Villeneuve and executive producer Ridley Scott, Blade Runner 2049 has a huge issue. As one writer put it on opening weekend: A Woman Problem. Here we'll take a look at why Blade Runner 2049 has a woman problem.

First and foremost, Blade Runner 2049 flunks the Bechdel Test.

We aren't taking anything away from the immense talents of gifted performers Robin Wright, Ana de Armas, Sylvia Hoeks, or Mackenzie Davis. »

- MovieWeb

Permalink | Report a problem


San Sebastián: Glenn Close Discusses ‘The Wife,’ Finding Inspiration, How to Celebrate Award Wins

30 September 2017 6:10 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

San Sebastian — There are few careers that boast the diversity and longevity of that of Glenn Close. There is neither medium nor genre that the actress has not worked in on some level. Typically recognized for her dramatic roles, think “Fatal Attraction,” Close has appeared in comedies: “The Stepford Wives,” “Louie,” animation: “Family Guy,” and “Tarza,” and big budget action films like Marvel’s “Guardians of the Galaxy,” series.

The actress was in town this week to promote her latest feature “The Wife,” in which Variety described her performance as “a marvel of twisty understatement.” Along with co-star Annie Starke, director Björn Runge and producer Claudia Bluemhuber, the four addressed the press Saturday morning.

The Wife,” is a story told from two perspectives, as described by Runge. “The young couple is creating a life together and the older is reflecting on that life. It’s the same characters, but they are on opposite sides.”

In »

- Jamie Lang

Permalink | Report a problem


Tiff Review: ‘Gutland’ is an Atmospheric Thriller Set in a Nefarious Community

13 September 2017 4:42 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

When a German drifter walks into the quaint Luxembourg village of Schandelsmillen with a scruffy beard, bag full of money, and stoically gruff attitude, we wonder what secrets his past holds. Jens Fauser (Frederick Lau) arrives with a single question: “Do you need help with the harvest?” That specific query unfortunately can’t help but make him stick out like a sore thumb further than he already does considering the harvest is half over. The townspeople therefore prove cold and cryptic, forcing him to accept work would be better found elsewhere. But as soon as that realization to move on arrives, the atmosphere abruptly shifts. Young Lucy (Vicky Krieps) invites him to her bed and old man Jos Gierens (Marco Lorenzini) takes him under wing. Suddenly he’s found home.

Writer/director Govinda Van Maele’s debut narrative feature Gutland shows this in rapid fashion so we never quite acknowledge everything’s inherent strangeness. »

- Jared Mobarak

Permalink | Report a problem


Toronto Film Review: ‘Mom & Dad’

11 September 2017 2:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“We love you but sometimes we just want to kill you” is a thought that crosses nearly every frazzled parents’ mind sooner or later. That figurative sentiment is taken all too literally in “Mom & Dad,” which finds the gonzo sensibility that writer-director Brian Taylor applied most usefully to the “Crank” action movies working at least as well in comedic horror. Though sure to be distasteful for some viewers even to ponder, this giddy exercise transcends mere bad-taste humor to become one of the great jet-black comedies about suburbia, destined for the same cult-classic status accorded “The Stepford Wives,” “Parents” and “Heathers.”

After a particularly good example of the 1970s genre pic homage that has infiltrated so many movies’ opening credits of late, we settle into discordant ordinary life on a seemingly ordinary day on a generic middle-class cul-de-sac in Whateversburg, USA (the movie was shot in Kentucky). Our protagonists are likewise very ordinary, if »

- Dennis Harvey

Permalink | Report a problem


Making Canaries: bringing an alien invasion to the Welsh valleys

24 August 2017 10:47 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Nikki Baughan Aug 25, 2017

Canaries is a British feature getting a Horror Channel FrightFest screening this weekend. We've been taking a look...

Think of big screen science fiction, and it’s likely to bring to mind glossy images of alien spacecrafts obliterating the White House, monsters running amuck in New York or Tokyo, or a post-apocalyptic Los Angelean wasteland. It’s perhaps unsurprising that these are the moments which linger in our collective consciousness; on screen at least, such cataclysmic events are usually clustered around the world’s big cities, with filmmakers giving little thought to how they might play out elsewhere.

There have been exceptions of course, such as classics like Village Of The Damned (1960) and The Stepford Wives (1975) and, in more recent years, UK filmmakers have also been looking to redress the balance. Marc Price set his 2008 zombie movie Colin on a suburban British estate, for example, while Stephen Fingleton »

Permalink | Report a problem


[Podcasts] Test Pattern – Episode 39: Who Goes There? – The Stepford Wives (1975) & Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

17 August 2017 9:03 AM, PDT | bloody-disgusting.com | See recent Bloody-Disgusting.com news »

Jacob and Tab get paranoid with two dread-inducing films from the 1970s – The Stepford Wives (1975) and Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978). What if everyone around you was being systematically replaced by inhuman facsimiles? Subscribe and Listen to Past Episodes: iTunes | Google Play | Stitcher | Web Player “Test Pattern” is made […] »

- Sean Miller

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: ‘Awaken the Shadowman’

21 July 2017 1:07 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A slow burn of a horror drama that doesn’t build toward quite enough of a blaze to be truly memorable, “Awaken the Shadowman” nonetheless ranks a cut above the genre norm for its atmospheric and confident setup. This debut feature for director “J.S. Wilson” (actually a pseudonym for the three scenarist-producers, two of whom are also the male leads) finds estranged brothers reunited over their mother’s disappearance, but increasingly troubled even more by weird goings-on in the town where they grew up. Some horror fans will decry the lack of gore — or even much violence — here. More discerning ones, however, may just lament that a film with such a strong first two-thirds grows rushed and underwhelming in the last lap.

After a brief prologue depicting an imperiled young woman and baby in 1964 Connecticut, we meet present-day protagonist Adam (James Zimbardi), a Redding, Calif. construction worker struggling to meet the needs of his small family — to »

- Dennis Harvey

Permalink | Report a problem


Blu-ray Review Round-Up: Invasion Of The Bee Girls, I Bury The Living, Virus, What’S The Matter With Helen?

19 May 2017 1:48 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

As Scream Factory continues to release pared-down catalogue titles on their now five-year-old label, the brand keeps expanding to include all different kinds of movies. Once known for releasing deluxe special editions of horror fan favorites, the company has diversified over the last half decade and begun releasing new films (as part of their deal with IFC midnight), unknown (and sometimes previously unavailable) cult films, a handful of classics, and even their own in-house productions. This last batch of catalogue titles, the majority of which have been released with only minimum bonus features but new HD scans, continues to broaden the reach of the Scream Factory brand to include a range of titles from secretly successful ’70s sexploitation sci-fi to well-intentioned failures of the 1990s.

First up is the 1958 cult classic I Bury the Living, directed by Albert Band (father of low-budget horror legend Charles Band, who would go on »

- Patrick Bromley

Permalink | Report a problem


Awards Race Disruption: Why ‘Get Out’ and Netflix Can Afford to Rewrite the Rules

11 May 2017 12:35 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Isn’t May a little early to launch an Oscar campaign? Not anymore. These days, it seems old rules don’t apply. On Tuesday evening, Universal marketing turned its “Get Out” DVD launch party into an ad-hoc awards event, inviting awards journalists to its Wisteria Lane backlot to celebrate Jordan Peele’s horror comedy about suburbia gone very wrong.

At $174 million to date (and an expected $50 million bonus rolling out overseas), “Get Out” is Blumhouse horror producer Jason Blum’s highest-grossing film (and his second Oscar contender, after “Whiplash”). And no one is more surprised to be in the awards conversation than breakout writer-director Peele, who is developing seven more original ideas for his new Universal first-look deal. Chances are, he’ll get more than $4.5 million to make them.

Being in any awards race is “a little surreal to me,” Peele told me. “I have a hard time accepting that’s part of the conversation. »

- Anne Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


Awards Race Disruption: Why ‘Get Out’ and Netflix Can Afford to Rewrite the Rules

11 May 2017 12:35 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Isn’t May a little early to launch an Oscar campaign? Not anymore. These days, it seems old rules don’t apply. On Tuesday evening, Universal marketing turned its “Get Out” DVD launch party into an ad-hoc awards event, inviting awards journalists to its Wisteria Lane backlot to celebrate Jordan Peele’s horror comedy about suburbia gone very wrong.

At $174 million to date (and an expected $50 million bonus rolling out overseas), “Get Out” is Blumhouse horror producer Jason Blum’s highest-grossing film (and his second Oscar contender, after “Whiplash”). And no one is more surprised to be in the awards conversation than breakout writer-director Peele, who is developing seven more original ideas for his new Universal first-look deal. Chances are, he’ll get more than $4.5 million to make them.

Being in any awards race is “a little surreal to me,” Peele told me. “I have a hard time accepting that’s part of the conversation. »

- Anne Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


'Get Out' is a strikingly scary thriller

25 April 2017 7:40 PM, PDT | MoreHorror | See recent MoreHorror news »

By: D.S.

MoreHorror.com

A young black man visits his white girlfriend's family estate where he learns that many of its residents, who are black, have gone missing, and he soon learns the horrible truth when a fellow black man on the estate warns him to Get Out! And this line was appealing enough for me to wait for this movie to Get Out!

Let me clear you, this film not what many would consider "true genre horror", it's definitely a scary thriller.

Black photographer Chris Washington (Daniel Kaluuya) and his white girlfriend Rose Armitage (Allison Williams) visit Rose's parents for the weekend, where they meet Chris for the very first time. Staggered by their behavior from the very off, Chris begins to think all is not right in the home of Dean (Bradley Whitford) and Missy Armitage (Catherine Keener).

The characters are fleshed out immaculately, with Bradley Whitford »

- admin

Permalink | Report a problem


Movie Review – Get Out (2017)

23 March 2017 9:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Get Out, 2017.

Directed by Jordan Peele.

Starring Daniel Kaluyya, Allison Williams, Bradley Whitford, Catherine Keener, LilRel Howery, Betty Gabriel, and Caleb Landry Jones.

Synopsis:

When a young African-American man visits his white girlfriend’s family estate, he becomes ensnared in a more sinister real reason for the invitation.Now that Chris (Daniel Kaluuya, Sicario) and his girlfriend, Rose (Allison Williams, Girls), have reached the meet-the-parents milestone of dating, she invites him for a weekend getaway upstate with Missy (Catherine Keener, Captain Phillips) and Dean (Bradley Whitford, The Cabin in the Woods).At first, Chris reads the family’s overly accommodating behavior as nervous attempts to deal with their daughter’s interracial relationship, but as the weekend progresses, a series of increasingly disturbing discoveries lead him to a truth that he could have never imagined.

Forget ghosts, vampires, zombies or other supernatural shenanigans. The terror presented in Jordan Peele’s terrific »

- Sean Wilson

Permalink | Report a problem


Rushes. Asian Film Awards, James Gray, Anatomy of a Gag, Agnès Varda

22 March 2017 10:04 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWSLam SuetThis year's Asian Film Awards are most notable for giving beloved Hong Kong character actor (and Johnnie To axiom) Lam Suet the award for Best Supporting Actor (for Trivisa). We were also happy to see that Tsui Hark (still madly inventive with this year's Journey to the West: The Demons Strike Back) was given the Lifetime Achievement Award.Chinese actress Li Li-hua has died at the age of 92. While not very well known in the West—except perhaps in the obscure Frank Borzage film China Doll (1958)—Li's work for the Shaw Brothers studio and, later, Golden Harvest, minted many classics, including Li Han-hsiang's The Magnificent Concubine (1962), and Storm Over the Yangtse River (1969), as well as King Hu's The Fate of Lee Khan (1975).For those who aren't able to travel to the Locarno Film Festival but are able to »

Permalink | Report a problem


Get Out review – tea, bingo… and racial terror

19 March 2017 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A young black man meets his white girlfriend’s parents in Jordan Peele’s chilling satire of liberal racism in the Us

Ira Levin, author of Rosemary’s Baby and The Stepford Wives, would have cracked a wry smile at the cackling satire of this chilling “social thriller”, the directorial debut from MadTV alumnus Jordan Peele. When a preppy rich girl takes her African American boyfriend home for the first time, loving harmony turns to creeping discord. Diving deep into the broiling undercurrents of “post-racial” America, Peele’s hybrid creation starts out like a modern reworking of Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, before drifting towards the more brutal territories of Kevin Smith’s Red State or Jeremy Saulnier’s Green Room, via the eerie mysteries of Charles Burnett’s To Sleep With Anger. Beneath the beatific smile of 21st-century liberalism, Get Out finds the still grinning ghoulish skull of »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

Permalink | Report a problem


The 2 Iconic Films That Inspired Jordan Peele's Horror Masterpiece, Get Out

3 March 2017 7:00 AM, PST | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

Jordan Peele's new film, Get Out, currently holds a rare 99 percent approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and for good reason. The subversive horror flick uses race as the primary motivator for the brilliant, bloody horror that transpires when a young black man (Daniel Kaluuya) accompanies his white girlfriend (Allison Williams) home for a weekend to meet her "liberal" parents. His descent into a terrifying "are they trying to kill me, or are they just weird?" back and forth results in an unsettling, funny, and overwhelmingly spooky movie. Given our current political climate, which makes Get Out more resonant than ever, it's easy to assume Peele's primary inspiration for the film was pulled from news headlines about black men continuously suffering grave and blatant injustice at the hands of white people. It turns out a lot of different things influenced the final product, which Peele began working on before »

- Quinn Keaney

Permalink | Report a problem


Jordan Peele on Get Out, the No. 1 Movie in the Country: ‘Horror Doesn’t Have to Be Disgusting’

2 March 2017 11:48 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

While Jordan Peele is a lifelong fan of horror movies, he knows that not everyone shares his enthusiasm for the genre which more often than not contain blood and guts and death and calculated scare tactics. With his directorial debut Get Out, however, which is a hit with critics and at the box office, he set out to make a horror movie that would be accessible to everyone — even those who don’t typically enjoy the genre.

“One thing I love about the reactions, I’ve got a lot of people saying, ‘I don’t like scary movies but I’m into this, »

- Kara Warner

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Get Out’ Is the First of Many ‘Social Thrillers’ Jordan Peele Has Planned

2 March 2017 8:34 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Just can’t get enough “Get Out”? Never fear, Jordan Peele has plenty more where that came from. The writer/director recently told Business Insider: “I have four other social thrillers that I want to unveil in the next decade.”

Get Out” brilliantly uses classic horror and thriller tropes to exorcise the demons of racism. It stars Daniel Kaluuya as a young black man who takes a weekend trip to his white girlfriend’s (Allison Williams) family home, where casual racism is merely a front for far more sinister aims. The film is a brilliant use of genre to explore social issues while also being equal parts wildly entertaining and deeply provocative.

Read More: ‘Get Out’ Review: Jordan Peele’s Directorial Debut Is A Horror Movie Unafraid To Call Out Racist Bullshit — Sundance 2017

Previously known as one half of the comedy duo “Key and Peele,” Peele took a running leap »

- Jude Dry

Permalink | Report a problem


Get Out – Review

23 February 2017 10:36 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

The first few months of the year seem to be prime territory for the studios to unleash new horror flicks. Perhaps the thinking is to get out of the way of most of the action blockbusters of the Spring/Summer and steer clear of those serious “message” prestige films near the end of the year. Well, maybe this “chiller” could be close to the later category. It’s got lotsa’ scares and some not-so-subtle bits of social commentary, a message horror flick. But it’s really not something new to ‘sinister cinema”. Many interpret the vampire legend as a commentary on female sexuality while others see zombie stories as metaphors for the struggle in the class system (the walking dead as the lower classes rising up to consume…). Perhaps the most famous example of this “mixing” is 1956’s iconic Invasion Of The Body Snatchers (and its three remakes), which some »

- Jim Batts

Permalink | Report a problem


Comedy Horror Movie Get Out Is Funny, Scary, Bloody — and Dead Serious About Racism

23 February 2017 6:17 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

When Chris Washington and Rose Armitage, his white girlfriend, arrive for a weekend visit with her family in a remote, leafy suburb, Dad tries hard (too hard) to allay any discomfort his guest may be experiencing.

Or to look at it from the other end, Dr. Armitage — he’s a neurosurgeon — is trying to disguise any hint that he and Rose’s mother might themselves be experiencing any discomfort: Chris is their daughter’s first African-American significant other, and Rose hasn’t told them in advance.

Dr. Armitage addresses Chris as “my man” and tells him how much he loved Barack Obama – wished, »

- Tom Gliatto

Permalink | Report a problem


Playback: Jordan Peele on ‘Get Out’ and Art’s Role Under a Trump Regime

23 February 2017 11:27 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast.

On this week’s episode, Jenelle Riley and I welcome back Variety Senior VP Tim Gray for one last round of Oscar predictions before Hollywood’s big night on Sunday. What are the tightest races? Is there a runaway sweep on the horizon or something more varied? Lots of questions. We’ll have answers in a few days.

Later in the show (27:58) I’m talking to “Key & Peele’s” Jordan Peele, whose directorial debut, “Get Out,” bowed at the Sundance Film Festival last month. A horror film with a definitive point of view, it feels like the beginning of a promising career for the comedian behind the camera. Going to Park City was beyond his wildest dreams, however.

Jordan Peele photographed exclusively for the Variety Playback podcast

Dan Doperalski for Variety

For more, listen to the latest episode of “Playback” below. Check back »

- Kristopher Tapley

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 33 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners