6.1/10
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3 user 1 critic

Gaijin - Ama-me Como Sou (2005)

In 1908, Titoe leaves her country, Japan, to try her luck in Brazil. Her intention is just to get rich and return in five years. But life has other plans for her.

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4 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Maria Yamashita Salinas
Jorge Perugorría ...
Gabriel Salinas
Aya Ono ...
Titoe (old)
Louise Cardoso ...
Sofia Salinas
Zezé Polessa ...
Gina Salinas
Luís Melo ...
Ramon Salinas
Mariana Ximenes ...
Weronika Muller
...
Kunihiro
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Kassia Lumi Abe ...
Young Shinobu
...
Young Pedro
Aparecido ...
Xetá
Apollo ...
Priest
Isadora Barion ...
Gina Salinas (child)
Paulo Castro ...
Guará
Lissa Diniz ...
Yoko Salinas
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Storyline

In 1908, Titoe leaves her country, Japan, to try her luck in Brazil. Her intention is just to get rich and return in five years. But life has other plans for her.

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2 September 2005 (Brazil)  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

'Gaijin' is the derogatory Japanese word for foreigner. See more »

Connections

Follows Gaijin, a Brazilian Odyssey (1980) See more »

Soundtracks

Ama-me como sou
Written by Pablo Milanés
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User Reviews

 
An unforgettable story
26 March 2006 | by (San Francisco) – See all my reviews

I didn't see the first Brazilian film "Gaijin, a Brazilian Odyssey," nor did I know what Gaijin means before I went to this screening. I was pleasantly surprised by this Brazilian sequel "Gaijin 2: Love Me As I Am" (Gaijin - Ama-me Como Sou).

"Gaijin" means foreigners in Japanese. "Gaijin 2: Love Me As I Am" tells an unforgettable story about Japanese immigrants in Brazil, covering several decades and four generations.

In 1908, Titoe came to Brazil from Japan, but she never thought that she would not return to Japan until she already has her great grand children. Over the years, they struggled to survive the war and the environment, to gain acceptance, to hold on to the community and Japanese heritage, to cope with the culture clash, and to overcome the prejudice toward "Gaijin." By the third generation, Titoe 's granddaughter Maria crossed the racial line and married to a Brazilian man Gabriel. The landscape begins to change because now Gabriel becomes the one who is trying to gain acceptance by the Japanese family and becomes a "gaijin." What makes this film's theme is so universal is that the story is not just about Japanese immigrants in Brazil, every ethnic group of immigrants can relate to those character's experiences with their own journey in a foreign land. I really enjoy Titoe's character and the performance of that 83 years old actress who is incredibly funny and moving.


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