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Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star (2003)

PG-13 | | Comedy | 5 September 2003 (USA)
A thirty-something former child star hires a foster family to re-create the childhood he never had.

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Referee
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Commentator
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Dickie's Corner Man
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Himself
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Emmanuel's Entourage (as Joey 'Coco' Diaz)
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Emmanuel's Entourage
Brian Clark ...
Guy in Car
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Storyline

Once, he was on top of the world as a popular child actor on TV. Now, he's Hollywood's punchline about everything wrong with people who were famous as children. All Dickie Roberts wants to do is find that one gig that will restore his honor and everyone's love of him, so after learning that Rob Reiner's making an ambitious new movie destined to sweep the Oscars, Dickie's first in line to audition. He walks out having learned he certainly looks the part but can't act it... yet, owing to his very unusual childhood. To research the role, Dickie embarks on a bizarre scheme to live with a suburban family to see how the average American child lives, having them put him up as their "son". But once his gloves are off, Dickie discovers how great it is to be part of a true family, and whether he gets the part or not, his attempt at method acting will certainly change his life forever. Written by ApprehensiveSpaghetti

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

50 million people used to watch him on TV. Now he washes their cars.

Genres:

Comedy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for crude and sex-related humor, language and drug references | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Release Date:

5 September 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dickie Roberts: (Former) Child Star  »

Box Office

Budget:

$17,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$6,660,540 (USA) (5 September 2003)

Gross:

$22,734,486 (USA) (21 November 2003)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Sally's "Brick wall, waterfall" routine was something Jenna Boyd was doing on the set between takes. The filmmakers liked it and worked it into the script - twice. See more »

Goofs

When Grace puts the cereal box in front of Dickie, she puts it where he would get it with his left hand. When he gets the cereal box, it's placed where he picks it up with his right hand. See more »

Quotes

Bully: Hey!
Dickie Roberts: Hey? Don't you mean "Oink"?
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Crazy Credits

At the very end of the credits, David Spade can be heard in voice-over, talking directly to the audience. Among other things, he encourages moviegoers to abandon their trash in their seats, and accuses someone in the audience of farting (then admits it was he). See more »

Connections

References Sunset Blvd. (1950) See more »

Soundtracks

Nights Are Forever without You
Written by Parker McGee
Performed by Dan Seals and John Ford Coley
Courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp.
By Arrangement with Warner Strategic Marketing
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User Reviews

 
This is knucking futs!
26 June 2004 | by (The Penumbra) – See all my reviews

David Spade is one of my fave SNL stars and he's made better movies than the rest of his old pals (It's Pat, Coneheads and Master of Disguise are among the worst films ever made). I especially liked him as the voice of Kuzko in the Emperor's New Groove. Here he plays Dickie Roberts: (former) Child Star, a kid at the top, but a man at the bottom and absolutely desperate for a comeback.

His agent (John Lovitz) cannot find him any work outside of celebrity boxing, his girlfriend has dumped him and Dickie's main source of income is parking cars. You get the picture, he's a completely fallen star.

Rob Reiner has a role that Dickie would love to get his hands on but Rob wont touch him because it requires an actor who knows 'normal', someone who knows how to be an adult, someone who had a proper childhood. Desperate to get the part, Dickie hires an ordinary middle-class family (dedicated mum, workaholic dad, bullied son, wishful daughter) to look after him like proper parents.

Trouble naturally follows. But Dickie's hijinks lessen and his new family's tolerance increases. Yes, they do learn from each other and become better people (yadda yadda) but there is just so much fun and craziness along the way and some genuine character moments.

There are loads of celebrity cameos (Tom Arnold, Corey Feldman, Brendan Fraser, Dustin Diamond) and lots of biting satire and the movie industry but the bulk of the film relies upon Dickie learning family values and having fun with the kids, being a kid. Proof positive that he's still the best (former) SNL star.

The only bad thing I can mention is Adam Sandler's involvement as executive producer, something that seriously tarnishes the film and prevents it from having any real class.

The DVD is in great looking 2.35:1 anamorphic widescreen with Dolby 5.1 sound and quite a few extras.


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