The Mother (2003) - News Poster

(2003)

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'Kaleidoscope': Film Review

'Kaleidoscope': Film Review
There may be no better actor alive to play a socially maladroit misfit than Toby Jones. It's a fact of which his brother Rupert Jones also seems to be aware, since he's written and directed a terrific vehicle for him. A dark psychological thriller clearly influenced by Alfred Hitchcock (who Jones played so memorably in The Girl), Kaleidoscope, also starring veteran British actress Anne Reid (The Mother), provides juicy opportunities for its leads to deliver tour-de-force performances — and they don't disappoint.

The central character, the middle-aged Carl (Jones), lives on an upper floor of the sort of nondescript middle-income,...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Anne Reid: 'Why am I cast as dreadful mothers? I’m adorable!’

She’s played Valerie Tatlock in Coronation Street and Daniel Craig’s lover in The Mother, and now stars in the thriller Kaleidoscope. Anne Reid talks to Rebecca Nicholson about awards, Victoria Wood and why it’s good to show older people falling in love on screen

‘What can I tell you without giving the whole plot away? That’s the problem,” smiles Anne Reid. We’re meeting to talk about Kaleidoscope, a knotty, taut and claustrophobic thriller starring Reid and Toby Jones, directed by his brother, Rupert Jones. It’s the kind of brilliantly insidious film that reveals its secrets slowly and cleverly. It’s far better to see it knowing absolutely nothing at all about it. Which, of course, makes it very difficult to talk about. “Well, let’s not tell people then,” Reid decides, firmly. “I play the mother of Toby Jones. It was a great part.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

IFC Looks Through the ‘Kaleidoscope’ This December

IFC Looks Through the ‘Kaleidoscope’ This December
IFC Midnight has announced a December 8, 2017, VOD release for their UK psychological thriller Kaleidoscope, which stars Toby Jones (Berberian Sound Studio, Red Lights, Tale of Tales, “Wayward Pines”), Anne Reid (The Mother) and Sinead Matthews (Happy-Go-Lucky). Described as a modern-day Psycho, Kaleidoscope explores the destructive relationship between a middle-aged man and his mother and is written and directed by Toby Jones’ brother Rupert […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

IFC Midnight Acquires ‘Psycho’-esque ‘Kaleidoscope’

IFC Midnight Acquires ‘Psycho’-esque ‘Kaleidoscope’
IFC Midnight has acquired the UK psychological thriller Kaleidoscope, which stars Toby Jones (Berberian Sound Studio, Red Lights, Tale of Tales, “Wayward Pines”), Anne Reid (The Mother) and Sinead Matthews (Happy-Go-Lucky). Described as a modern day Psycho, Kaleidoscope explores the destructive relationship between a middle-aged man and his mother and is written and directed by Toby Jones’ brother Rupert Jones, who previously directed his brother […]
See full article at Bloody-Disgusting.com »

Nick Hornby short-form TV series 'State Of The Union' in the works

  • ScreenDaily
Nick Hornby short-form TV series 'State Of The Union' in the works
Exclusive: Relationship dramedy produced by See-Saw Films will be directed by Notting Hill’s Roger Michell.

See-Saw Films and writer Nick Hornby are teaming up on a TV series about marriage counselling.

State Of The Union will be directed by Roger Michell (Notting Hill) and is made up of ten ten-minute episodes.

The series follows a middle-aged couple who meet in the pub before going into marriage counselling each week. Each episode shows the ten minutes before they face the counsellor.

State Of The Union will shoot in London this autumn with the cast and broadcast partner set to be announced soon.

See-Saw told Screen that they expect the show to be aired both online and by a TV broadcaster.

Hakan Kousetta, COO of television at See-Saw, said: “Because it’s a completely different format, it lends itself to something a broadcaster can play with. It’s not just a piece of digital television, it’s a proper
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Nick Hornby, See-Saw Films team for short-form TV series

  • ScreenDaily
Nick Hornby, See-Saw Films team for short-form TV series
Exclusive: Relationship dramedy will be directed by Notting Hill’s Roger Michell.

See-Saw Films and writer Nick Hornby are teamig up on a TV series about marriage counselling.

State Of The Union will be directed by Roger Michell (Notting Hill) and is made up of ten ten-minute episodes.

The series follows a middle-aged couple who meet in the pub before going into marriage counselling each week. Each episode shows the ten minutes before they face the counsellor.

State Of The Union will shoot in London this autumn with the cast and broadcast partner set to be announced soon.

See-Saw told Screen that they expect the show to be aired both online and by a TV broadcaster.

Hakan Kousetta, COO of television at See-Saw, said: “Because it’s a completely different format, it lends itself to something a broadcaster can play with. It’s not just a piece of digital television, it’s a proper
See full article at ScreenDaily »

My Cousin Rachel review – fateful attraction

Rachel Weisz is captivating as the enigmatic heroine in a Daphne du Maurier adaptation that adds modern psychology to the period drama

“Did she? Didn’t she? Who’s to blame?” When 20th Century Fox first brought Daphne du Maurier’s slippery 1951 novel to the screen a mere year after its publication, its overheated publicity promised that Olivia de Havilland was “the only star in the world” who could portray its titular heroine, a mysterious beauty who left bewildered men wondering: “Was she woman or witch, Madonna or murderess?!”

Now, Rachel Weisz gives De Havilland a run for her money in a new screen version of Du Maurier’s twisty tale. It’s written and directed with pastiche-inflected panache by Roger Michell, whose diverse CV ranges from the romcom Notting Hill to the psychodrama Enduring Love via the provocative The Mother. Pitting Weisz’s captivating 19th-century widow against Sam Claflin
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Toby Jones, Anne Reid lead UK thriller 'Kaleidoscope'

  • ScreenDaily
Exclusive: Production underway on feature produced by Matthew James Wilkinson and Maggie Monteith.

Principal photography has begun in London on UK psychological thriller Kaleidoscope, which will star Toby Jones (Dad’s Army), Anne Reid (The Mother) and Sinead Matthews (Happy-Go-Lucky).

Described as a modern day Psycho, Kaleidoscope explores the destructive relationship between a middle-aged man and his mother and is written and directed by Toby Jones’ brother Rupert Jones.

The latter previously directed his brother in 2006 short The Sickie and more recently took the reins on well-received 2013 musical-drama The Answer To Everything, Streetwise Opera’s 10th anniversary production starring a cast of 120 homeless people, which was distributed by the BFI.

Producers are Matthew James Wilkinson (The Call Up) of Stigma Films and Maggie Monteith (Searching For Sugar Man) of Dignity Film Finance under the production banner of Longships Films Ltd.

Executive producers are Chris Reed and Phil Rymer with Roopesh Parekh (Poldark) co-producing.

BAFTA TV and
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Orlando Bloom on board for Indian co-production

Orlando Bloom on board for Indian co-production
Turning to be a truly Indian global studio, Vistaar Entertainment helmed by Sheetal Talwar, following backing films such as 'The Eichmann Show' starring Martin Freeman, 'The Joneses' starring Demi Moore and David Duchovny, will produce 'Romans' starring award winning actor Orlando Bloom (The Lord of the Rings trilogy, Pirates of the Caribbean, The Hobbit) alongside a stellar cast including; Anne Reid (Coronation Street, Hot Fuzz, The Mother); Alex Ferns (EastEnders, Legend) and Rory Nolan (The Dark Knight Rises, Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Irregulars). Directed by The Shamassian Brothers (The Pyramid Texts) with screenplay by BAFTA award winning writer Geoff Thompson, Romans is being produced by Sheetal Vinod Talwar's Vistaar along with James Harris and Mark Lane of The Tea Shop & Film Company and Jasper Graham of Dreamscape Films. Set in present day London, Romans is based on true life events and follows the
See full article at BollywoodHungama »

Le Week-End | Review

Meant to Be Spent Alone: Michell’s Latest a Welcome Return to Quality Filmmaking

After a pair of mainstream Us misfires, South African born director Roger Michell returns to the UK for his latest film, Le Week-End, a portrait of a married heterosexual couple after thirty years of marriage that is as moving as it is engaging and astute. Enhanced by a pair of performances from a melancholy Jim Broadbent and an incredibly prickly yet gloriously acerbic Lindsay Duncan, Michell once again utilizes the strengths of screenwriter Hanif Kureishi and creates a visual journey out of what is, mostly, a sparring of contradictory wills through a series of well written dialogues. Though best known for his 1999 Julia Roberts/Hugh Grant starrer, Notting Hill, his latest ranks with his other top tier titles like The Mother and Venus.

Deciding to celebrate their 30th anniversary in Paris, university professor Nick (Broadbent) and
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

DVD Review: 'Le Week-End'

  • CineVue
★★★☆☆ Upholding the current vogue of films both targeted at an older tier of cinemagoers and depicting the romantic ups and downs of characters in their autumn years, Le Week-End (2013) sees director Roger Michell teaming up once more with screenwriter Hanif Kureishi for another witty and jaggedly charming gander at identity and the processes of maturing somewhat gracefully. Two of their previous collaborations have focused on older characters reaching something of an impasse - from Anne Reid's impassioned grandmother in The Mother (2003) to the late Peter O'Toole's twinkly-eyed pensioner in Venus (2006).
See full article at CineVue »

The top 25 underappreciated films of 2004

Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 9 Jan 2014 - 06:25

We head back a decade to look at a few films that deserve more attention. Here’s our list of 25 underappreciated movies of 2004...

Think back to 2004, and you might dredge up hazy memories of the computer-generated fairytale sequel Shrek 2, Alfonso’s Harry Potter installment, The Prisoner Of Azkaban, or maybe Mel Gibson’s phenomenally successful Passion Of The Christ.

It’s rather less likely that you’ll remember some of the films on this list. You’re probably aware of the drill by now: we’ve gone back into our distant, beer-addled memories to find 25 of the less commonly-lauded movies from the year 2004.

Some of them did reasonably well at the time, but appear to have been forgotten since (especially the one eclipsed by its own internet meme), while others were coolly received by the public or critics (and sometimes
See full article at Den of Geek »

The best albums of 2013: how our writers voted

  • The Guardian - Film News
How did we come up with our chart? By tallying the votes of our pop writers – and here's what they plumped for

Tim Jonze

Albums

John Wizards – John Wizards

Disclosure – Settle

Paramore – Paramore

Hebronix – Unreal

Kanye West – Yeezus

Christopher Owens – Lysandre

Julia Holter – Loud City Song

Daft Punk – Random Access Memories

Sky Ferreira – Night Time, My Time

British Sea PowerFrom The Sea To The Land Beyond

Tracks

Julia Holter – Hello Stranger

Miguel and Mariah Carey – #Beautiful

Drake – Hold On, We're Going Home

Sky Ferreira – You're Not the One

Justin Timberlake – Suit and Tie

Jeffrey Lewis – Wwprd

Paramore – Still Into You

Disclosure feat. AlunaGeorge – White Noise

The 1975 – Chocolate

Stylo G – Soundbwoy

Tom Hughes

Albums

15-60-75 The Numbers Band – Jimmy Bell's Still in Town

Meat Wave – Meat Wave

The Drones – I See Seaweed 4

White Fence – Live in San Francisco

Ooga Boogas – Ooga Boogas

Superchunk – I Hate Music

Bits of
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The top 25 underrated films of 2003

Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 19 Dec 2013 - 06:30

Our journey through the lesser-known films of the 2000s continues. This week, it's 2003...

It was the year that Arnold Schwarzenegger went from Terminator actor to Governor of California, and when The Lord Of The Rings: The Return Of The King dominated the global box office with a gross of more than $1bn. 2003 was also the year the Wachowskis' Matrix trilogy thundered to a close, the year Freddy Krueger clashed with Jason Voorhees in, er, Freddy Vs Jason, and the year Pixar scored another hit with Finding Nemo.

But as you've probably gathered by now, 2003 was also a year of quite brilliant, less lucrative films. The movies we've included in this week's list were chosen for a variety of reasons - some were ignored in cinemas, while others were harshly treated by critics. Some were modestly popular or given awards on release,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Third time lucky for Prisoners, and UK box office has its worst weekend of 2013

No film managed to take in an excess of £1m, but Proclaimers musical Sunshine on Leith moves to second place and Le Week-end had a commendable opening

Sunshine on Leith: watch the trailer for Dexter Fletcher's musical – video

• Read Peter Bradshaw's review of Le Week-end

The slump

From bad to worse: the expression is aptly applied to the currently becalmed UK box office. The weekend delivered the lowest overall grosses of the past year, with no film achieving takings in excess of £1m. The last time no title managed seven figures was back in June 2012, when a staggered release of Ice Age: Continental Drift saw it occupy the top spot with takings just from Scotland, Ireland and Northern Ireland.

The poor result is partly an anomaly relating to the way the UK box office is tracked and accounted. In fact, new DreamWorks animation Turbo was playing previews on Saturday and Sunday,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Le Week-end – review

Lindsay Duncan and Jim Broadbent shine in Roger Michell and Hanif Kureishi's melancholy romantic comedy

Having previously collaborated on The Mother and Venus (the former something of an overlooked gem), writer Hanif Kureishi and director Roger Michell reunite for this tale of a long-married couple attempting to get away from it all in Paris, but instead finding the broiling tensions in their relationship coming to an unexpected head. Mixing its ennui with a vitality and underlying sense of defiance, this very likable melancholy rom-(non?)-com boasts splendid turns from Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan, between whom the sparks (hostile, passionate, dependent) fly with conviction and grace. He is a disillusioned lecturer, out of favour with his college, misanthropic with his students; she is a teacher, still eager to grab life by the throat, wanting more from her future than the acceptance of disappointment or the familiarity of comfortable estrangement.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Hanif Kureishi: in praise of adultery

Nick and Meg go to Paris for their 30th anniversary and confront some tricky questions. In his new film, Le Week-End, Hanif Kureishi meditates on the old problem of marriage and desire

Marriage as a problem, and as a solution, has always been the central subject for drama, the novel and the cinema, just as it has been at the centre of our lives. Most of us have come from a marriage, and, probably, a divorce, of some sort. And the kind of questions that surround lengthy relationships – what is it to live with another person for a long time? What do we expect? What do we need? What do we want? What is the relation between safety and excitement, for each of us? – are the most important of our lives. Marriage brings together the most serious things: sex, love, children, betrayal, boredom, frustration, and property.

Le Week-End is a
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Roger Michell and Hanif Kureishi talk about Le Week-End

Lindsay Duncan and Jim Broadbent as Meg and Nick in Le Week-End - 'Slowly the characters come into focus and it becomes clearer how you should cast them' Listening to Hanif Kureishi and Roger Michell spar at the San Sebastian Film Festival press conference and roundtable interviews for Le Week-End, you can't help feeling that their own enduring relationship must have played, at least a little, into their creation of middle-aged couple Meg and Nick. The writer and director - whose collaboration began back in 1993 with mini-series The Buddha Of Surburbia and has included 2003's The Mother and Venus in 2006 - enjoy a quick-fire, easy repartee. In their film, Meg (Lindsay Duncan) and Nick (Jim Broadbent) have a similar conversational cut and thrust - although they are skating on much thinner ice. We follow them over the course of a weekend as they do runners from restaurants, bump into Nick's
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

British-Asian cinema: the sequel

Twelve years on from the hugely acclaimed East Is East comes its sequel, West Is West. Sarfraz Manzoor examines the new directions British-Asian film-makers are taking

Ayub Khan-Din was in his first year at drama school in Salford when his mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Khan-Din, the mixed-race son of a Pakistani Muslim father and a white Catholic mother, found that each time he came home, another slab of his mother's memory had disappeared. The past, with all its stories, was slipping into the void, and Khan-Din became determined to try to preserve his parents' history and his own experience of growing up.

Although he was studying to be an actor, Khan-Din started writing. At the time, Asians were rarely glimpsed on screen in the UK unless they were being beaten up by racist skinheads, running corner shops or fleeing arranged marriages. Khan-Din wanted to tell a different story
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Roger Michell interview: Morning Glory, directing films and working with Harrison Ford

Roger Michell, the director of films such as Venus, Notting Hill and Changing Lanes, chats to us about making movies, and his latest, Morning Glory...

For the last 20 years, Roger Michell has been directing for both television and cinema, working on both sides of the Atlantic on projects such as Notting Hill, Changing Lanes, The Mother, Enduring Love and Venus.

Out this week is his new film, Morning Glory, the 'rom-job-com' which stars Rachel McAdams as an ambitious young television producer who is tasked with turning around the performance of morning news show, Daybreak, and features strong support from the likes of Harrison Ford, Diane Keaton and Jeff Goldblum.

We had the chance to chat with Michell about the art of directing, the trouble with genres, and the best way to treat Hollywood movie stars...

As a director, you've helmed films in a variety of genres: dramas, thrillers and comedies.
See full article at Den of Geek »
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