6.5/10
1,807
46 user 33 critic

Die, Mommie, Die! (2003)

R | | Comedy | 31 October 2003 (USA)
An ex-pop singer kills her much-hated husband to be with her young lover. Her daughter plots Electra-like revenge.

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(play), (screenplay)
4 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Angela Arden / Barbara Arden
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Angela's Fan
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Tony Parker
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Edith Sussman
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Bootsie Carp
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Sol Sussman
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Lance Sussman
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Policeman
Victor Raider-Wexler ...
Sam Fishbein
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Shatzi Van Allen
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Moving Man #1 (as Chris McDaniel)
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Moving Man #2
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Tuchman
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Leather Daddy
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Storyline

Retired singing star, Angela Arden, heads a dysfunctional family. Her husband, filmmaker Sol Sussman, hates her and has a kissy relationship with his nubile daughter, Edith. Angela carries on an affair with Tony Parker, a lounge lizard, who sleeps with both Edith and her brother, Lance, but not before Angela plots to murder Sol when he cuts off her allowance. Bootsie Carp, the family maid loyal to Sol, is on to Angela, but the diva works quickly and poisons Sol. Edith suspects foul play and wants Lance's help in proving mom's guilt. Lance, who loves his mother deeply, is conflicted. Will Edith succeed? Does love lurk somewhere? And what about Angela's long dead sister, Barbara? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Hollywood...It's a dirty town but someone has to do it!

Genres:

Comedy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong sexual content, language and a drug scene
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Details

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Release Date:

31 October 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Piccole bugie travestite  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of the framed photos the camera pans by while Angela (Charles Busch) is administering the deadly suppository to her husband is of Busch in his stage appearance as Gertrude(Gertie) Garnet in his play "The Lady in Question". The photo was used on all the play's promotional materials. See more »

Goofs

Movie is set in 1967 but Angela sings the Blood, Sweat & Tears hit "Spinning Wheel" which was not released until 1969. See more »

Quotes

Sol Sussman: Never forget that you're half Sussman. And the other half, that strange, Canadian goyish of flotsam... that, you can dismiss.
Edith Sussman: It's your blood that I'm proud of.
Sol Sussman: You are my daughter, my immortality. What is our motto?
Edith Sussman: Make it big... give it Class... and leave 'em with a message!
Sol Sussman: Yeah!
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Crazy Credits

After the credits, there is silent black and white footage of Angela christening a ship. See more »

Connections

Featured in Anatomy of a Scene: Die, Mommie, Die! (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

Spinning Wheel
Written by David Clayton-Thomas
Performed by Charles Busch
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User Reviews

High camp genre parody works pretty well
21 January 2003 | by (Budapest) – See all my reviews

Charles Busch is a female impersonator who writes and stars in genre parodies. His last filmed effort was Psycho Beach Party. This latest effort, Die Mommie Die, is a parody of the drama queen melodramas of the 50s and 60s, in which actresses like Susan Hayward schemed and

seduced callously, and encountered crises which were not only larger than their real-life counterparts, but also arrived with far greater frequency.

The genre died out of the film world before most of you were born, but it left behind a legacy of nighttime soap operas like Dynasty, so if you can remember Joan Collins on the small screen, you'll have a good idea of the equivalent big screen target Busch is focusing on.

Busch is a talented guy, whom you may remember from his portrayal of Nat Ginsberg on Oz. I don't know if it's even correct to call him a female impersonator. He is a male who plays certain types of female roles convincingly. His characterization in this film is so convincing that you'll forget he is a male, and his writing shows a real gift for walking the line between lampoon and homage.

Busch and director Mark Rucker got the actors to deliver all their outrageous lines in a consistently theatrical and obviously insincere style to match Busch's own. I thought Jason Priestly was especially funny as a bisexual gigolo. The entire film plays out as if everyone in the cast knows he or she is in a high camp entertainment, and wants the audience to know that they know.

I laughed a lot, to tell you the truth. I suppose drag queen movies may not be what most of you are looking for. Me neither. But the fact of the matter is that Busch can probably evoke the actresses of that era better than any contemporary female I can name. Hell, When I was a kid I always wondered if Bette Davis and Joan Crawford were really middle aged men in wigs, so who better to portray them than a 48 year old man in a wig?

Busch is making fun of the melodrama queens, but he also has a gift for witty dialogue and a genuine regard for the subject matter which makes this an entertaining confection about part of filmdom's barely-remembered past.


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