6.3/10
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158 user 38 critic

Party Monster (2003)

Based on the true story of Michael Alig, a Club Kid party organizer whose life was sent spiraling down when he bragged on television about killing his drug dealer and roommate.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Dillon Woolley ...
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Elliot Kriss ...
Cabbie
Janis Dardaris ...
TV Reporter
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Johnny
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Freez
Brendan O'Malley ...
Phillip Knasiak ...
Young Wrestler
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Storyline

Set in the New York club scene of the late 1980's thru the 1990's, a tale which is based on the rise and fall of club-kid promoter Michael Alig, a party organizer, whose extravagant life was sent spiralling downward when he boasted on television that he had killed his friend, roommate, and drug dealer, Angel Melendez. Originally from Indiana, Alig moved to New York, and came to be an underground legend, known for his excessive drug use and outrageous behavior in the club world. At his peak, he had his own record label, and magazine, and hosted Disco 2000, one of the biggest club nights in New York in the '90s. He was doing a lot of drugs, and as his addiction got worse, his party themes became darker and more twisted. Alig's saga reached its tragic crescendo when he viciously murdered his drug dealer, Angel, by injecting him with Drano and throwing him in the East River. The power he wielded on the club scene made him feel untouchable, so he didn't hesitate to boast of the murder. The... Written by Sujit R. Varma

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

good. evil. fun. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for pervasive drug use, language and some violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

17 October 2003 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Party szörnyek  »

Box Office

Budget:

$5,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$68,719 (USA) (12 September 2003)

Gross:

$296,665 (USA) (12 September 2003)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The "Club Kids" were a real group of people in the 1980s, young people (usually twenty five was considered too old) who would go to clubs and make themselves into celebrities with bizarre antics and self-styled images. The Club Kids made their entire livings based on the fact that they were Club Kids - party organizers, club owners, and talk show hosts paid them obscene amounts of money simply to show up and party. See more »

Goofs

Some props had styling cues of 1990s products, such as the boombox used to play a cassette tape with Stacey Q's "Two Of Hearts", alongside a 1990s Chevy Caprice being portrayed as the fed's car. See more »

Quotes

The Rat: Remember me? Clara the Chicken... and Terisius the Rat!
James: [in exasperated voice] No!
The Rat: [pats James' head] You really should stay off the K
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Connections

References It's a Wonderful Life (1946) See more »

Soundtracks

Supermodel
Written and Performed by Larry Tee
Courtesy of Mogul Electro
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User Reviews

 
So bad, it's good - a guilty pleasure, if not quite as hedonistic as the lives of the club kids themselves
2 January 2005 | by (Melbourne, Australia) – See all my reviews

Party Monster is based on the true story of 80s club kid and promoter, Michael Alig, infamous for his bizarre New York parties and, later, for the brutal murder of a drug dealer.

It's adapted from Alig's friend James St James' book Disco Bloodbath by filmmakers Fenton Bailey and Randy Barbato, whose earlier documentary about Alig actually inspired St James to write the book. After a nine-year absence, Macauley Culkin returns to film as cherubic bisexual Alig, who persuades James St James (a camp Seth Green) to teach him the art of infamy.

Famous for doing nothing long before reality TV, Alig becomes a manufacturer of celebrity and a promoter, serving up some wild parties, including a Halloween bloodbath, truck rave and kinky hospital party. The costumes, by Richie Rich and Michael Wilkinson, are spectacular and capture the excesses of the era. These kids affix fake spiders and cobwebs to their faces, wrap themselves in blood-soaked bandages,wear full body costumes and never look less than fabulous.

Considering the low budget and appalling production values, the high profile supporting cast is a surprise. Dylan McDermot plays Galien, club owner and Alig's mentor, with Mia Kirshner as his wife, Chloe Sevigny as Alig's girlfriend, plus Natasha Lyonne, Marilyn Manson and John Stamos. Wilson Cruz is enigmatic as wannabe and drug dealer Angel, and Wilmer Valderra is suitably objectified as Alig's beloved beefcake, DJ Keoki.

Party Monster suffers from uneven performances and poor direction but despite this, it's fascinating. It captures the disposability of party drug culture convincingly and will most likely become a cult classic. ***/***** stars.


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