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1-20 of 40 items from 2004   « Prev | Next »


Berlin fest verdict is Emmerich

26 December 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

COLOGNE, Germany -- German director Roland Emmerich will be president of the international jury for the 2005 Berlin International Film Festival, organizers have announced. Berlin also unveiled several films that will run in competition for the 2005 Golden Bear, including Wes Anderson's The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou, Terry George's Hotel Rwanda and Marc Rothemund's Sophie Scholl -- Hope and Resistance. Emmerich's career started at the 1984 Berlin festival when his debut, The Noah's Ark Principle, screened in competition. The sci-fi drama impressed with its epic look achieved on a virtually nonexistent budget. Emmerich soon made the jump to Hollywood, where he directed such popcorn blockbusters as Independence Day, Godzilla and The Day After Tomorrow. »

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Berlin fest verdict is Emmerich

26 December 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

COLOGNE, Germany -- German director Roland Emmerich will be president of the international jury for the 2005 Berlin International Film Festival, organizers have announced. Berlin also unveiled several films that will run in competition for the 2005 Golden Bear, including Wes Anderson's The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou, Terry George's Hotel Rwanda and Marc Rothemund's Sophie Scholl -- Hope and Resistance. Emmerich's career started at the 1984 Berlin festival when his debut, The Noah's Ark Principle, screened in competition. The sci-fi drama impressed with its epic look achieved on a virtually nonexistent budget. Emmerich soon made the jump to Hollywood, where he directed such popcorn blockbusters as Independence Day, Godzilla and The Day After Tomorrow. »

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Berlin fest verdict is Emmerich

26 December 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

COLOGNE, Germany -- German director Roland Emmerich will be president of the international jury for the 2005 Berlin International Film Festival, organizers have announced. Berlin also unveiled several films that will run in competition for the 2005 Golden Bear, including Wes Anderson's The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou, Terry George's Hotel Rwanda and Marc Rothemund's Sophie Scholl -- Hope and Resistance. Emmerich's career started at the 1984 Berlin festival when his debut, The Noah's Ark Principle, screened in competition. The sci-fi drama impressed with its epic look achieved on a virtually nonexistent budget. Emmerich soon made the jump to Hollywood, where he directed such popcorn blockbusters as Independence Day, Godzilla and The Day After Tomorrow. »

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Seven films selected for VFX bake-off

22 December 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The shortlist for the 2004 visual effects Academy Award pits Martin Scorsese's reality-based The Aviator against six films that offer various degrees of VFX-assisted fantasy: Spider-Man 2, Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, The Day After Tomorrow, I, Robot and Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow. The seven bake-off contenders for the 77th Annual Academy Awards, which were announced Friday, were culled from an intermediary list of 18 films drawn from an initial qualifying list of 250 films, according to Richard Edlund, chairman of the visual effects branch executive committee. "Our list gets longer every year," Edlund said. "Visual effects are more and more part of the glamour of filmmaking." Industrial Light + Magic garnered the most attention, having contributed to four of the seven films. The Marin County, Calif., shop was the lead house on Potter and Lemony and contributed last-minute shots to both Day After Tomorrow and Sky Captain. »

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7 studio pics up for visual effects Oscar

17 December 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Seven major studio releases are in the running for the achievement in visual effects Oscar, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Friday. They are The Aviator, The Day After Tomorrow, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, I, Robot, Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow and Spider-Man 2. Fifteen-minute clip reels from each of the seven films will be screened for the Visual Effects Award Nominating Committee on Jan. 19, the Academy said. The members will pick three of these seven films for the Oscar consideration. Finalists will be announced along with nominations in 23 other categories on Jan. 25. »

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VIP gets first look at Emmerich pics

26 October 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

COLOGNE, Germany -- Director Roland Emmerich has signed a first-look production deal with leading independent German film fund VIP that will give VIP first crack at financing and co-producing Emmerich's nonstudio fare, the parties said Monday. VIP and Emmerich said they are discussing possible projects to co-produce. The company is interested in big-budget event features in the $40 million-$100 million range for which Emmerich could take on directing duties, VIP chairman Andreas Schmid said. A U.S. release would be a prerequisite for any production that VIP boards, Schmid said. The German-born Emmerich -- whose latest work, the disaster epic The Day After Tomorrow, earned $542 million worldwide -- will set up a production entity with VIP in Munich this year to handle joint projects. Oswald Von Richthofen, assistant director on Emmerich's low-budget debut The Noah's Ark Principle, will head up the company, as yet unnamed. »

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Sella, Levine steer Fox through tricky summer

8 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The summer's boxoffice market share leader, 20th Century Fox, boasted an unprecedented six straight $20 million-plus openings. The Hollywood Reporter spoke with Fox co-presidents of marketing Tony Sella and Pam Levine about successfully navigating the challenges of the tricky summer release. The Hollywood Reporter: How difficult was it for you to cut through all of the marketing clutter of the summer to launch your films? Pam Levine: I think it is getting more difficult because it's not just clutter in the marketplace, but it's clutter in all the places we try and reach our customers -- the theater, on television, even online, outdoor -- everything is cluttered. We used online this summer in a more aggressive way than we had in the past because it's a place you can be creative in a different way than you can be in the theaters or on television. On Dodgeball, we had a clip of a guy just getting pummeled by dodge balls. It was an outtake from the movie. It was hysterical, and it became something that people were sending around to each other because it was just so funny. That communicated a particularly unique element of the movie and its comedy. With The Day After Tomorrow, our Internet advertising campaign launched seven months out. We went up with an advertising blitz on movie-ticketing sites the same day our teaser trailer went out with Matrix, figuring we were getting the audience that was going to the movies. That strategically made sense, and it allowed us to plant our flag early and have double the impact of just having the teaser go up in the theaters. On Day After Tomorrow, we knew we were going to be shouting in the faces of all these other movies -- Van Helsing and Troy and Shrek -- so rather than water down our weight, we had a really concentrated buy in the final four weeks of the campaign. It allowed us to have much more of an impact. Tony Sella: Because of the clutter, part of the strategy is taking in the competition. If it's a comedy, what other comedies are around it, how can you position yourself differently? Can you be more of an event picture than that event picture? You have to take advantage not only of the concept of your film but also the window in which you have to be different and unusual. »

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Sella, Levine steer Fox through tricky summer

8 September 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The summer's boxoffice market share leader, 20th Century Fox, boasted an unprecedented six straight $20 million-plus openings. The Hollywood Reporter spoke with Fox co-presidents of marketing Tony Sella and Pam Levine about successfully navigating the challenges of the tricky summer release. The Hollywood Reporter: How difficult was it for you to cut through all of the marketing clutter of the summer to launch your films? Pam Levine: I think it is getting more difficult because it's not just clutter in the marketplace, but it's clutter in all the places we try and reach our customers -- the theater, on television, even online, outdoor -- everything is cluttered. We used online this summer in a more aggressive way than we had in the past because it's a place you can be creative in a different way than you can be in the theaters or on television. On Dodgeball, we had a clip of a guy just getting pummeled by dodge balls. It was an outtake from the movie. It was hysterical, and it became something that people were sending around to each other because it was just so funny. That communicated a particularly unique element of the movie and its comedy. With The Day After Tomorrow, our Internet advertising campaign launched seven months out. We went up with an advertising blitz on movie-ticketing sites the same day our teaser trailer went out with Matrix, figuring we were getting the audience that was going to the movies. That strategically made sense, and it allowed us to plant our flag early and have double the impact of just having the teaser go up in the theaters. On Day After Tomorrow, we knew we were going to be shouting in the faces of all these other movies -- Van Helsing and Troy and Shrek -- so rather than water down our weight, we had a really concentrated buy in the final four weeks of the campaign. It allowed us to have much more of an impact. Tony Sella: Because of the clutter, part of the strategy is taking in the competition. If it's a comedy, what other comedies are around it, how can you position yourself differently? Can you be more of an event picture than that event picture? You have to take advantage not only of the concept of your film but also the window in which you have to be different and unusual. »

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Germany boxoffice bounces back

19 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

COLOGNE, Germany -- Germany's boxoffice regained some of its momentum in the first half of this year, with ticket revenue inching up 1.4% to €420 million ($517.7 million), according to official figures released Wednesday by the German Film Board. The official tally confirmed earlier estimates that more than 1 million more tickets were sold in the first six months of the year compared with the same period last year, representing a total of 72.3 million admissions. Leading the pack were The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban as well as two Hollywood films by German directors: Wolfgang Petersen's Troy and Roland Emmerich's The Day After Tomorrow. There were no German films released in the first half of 2004 to match the success of last year's Good bye, Lenin! and the market share for German films slipped to 13.9% from a year-earlier 17.1%. But those figures don't take into account the astronomical business generated by Constantin Film's (T)Raumschiff Surprise -- Periode 1 (Spaceship Surprise -- Period 1). The sci-fi spoof by Michael Bully Herbig regained the No. 1 spot in its fourth session last weekend, bringing its total earnings to €40.8 million ($50.3 million). Spaceship is already the year's No. 1 release, and if it continues its record-breaking pace, it could single-handedly push the market share for German films this year to something approaching 20%, industry observers said. »

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Gordon, Touchstone link in two-year deal

16 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Producer Mark Gordon has set up shop at Touchstone Television. Gordon, a veteran feature producer whose recent credits include The Day After Tomorrow and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, has cut a two-year overall deal with Touchstone with an emphasis on developing drama projects for the studio. Touchstone is already in business with Gordon on the ABC midseason drama Grey's Anatomy, revolving around a group of medical interns trying to make it through a grueling surgical training program. Gordon is executive producing the series along with creator Shonda Rhimes, Betsy Beers and Jim Parriott. »

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'Robot' dominating int'l circuit<BR clear="none"/>

8 August 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

SYDNEY -- I, Robot performed solidly this weekend, taking the No. 1 spot internationally. The film took in a whopping $30.9 million on 6,034 screens in 29 territories, according to estimates from distributor 20th Century Fox. That was the best day-and-date figure for the company since The Day After Tomorrow, a brought in a cumulative total to date of $70.8 million after its (mostly) second week. The film opened No. 1 in the United Kingdom with about $8.4 million on 710 screens, streets ahead of the second player, 13 Going on 30, with half a million dollars, and on par with Minority Report. But this was nowhere near top performers like The Matrix (£8.7 million to I, Robot's £3.8 million). Fox put the lower-than-expected figures down to tropical storms in Europe. The futuristic thriller also took top honors opening in Germany ($5.1 million on 910 screens); Austria ($757,000 from 102 screens); Sweden ($689,000 on 82 screens); Belgium ($675,000 on 87); Holland ($642,000 on 108); Indonesia ($171,000 on 54); Norway ($343,000 on 63); Bolivia $31,000 on eight); and Brazil ($979,000 on 396). Fox predicted they would secure the No. 1 position in Russia, where I, Robot took $2.4 million from 292 screens; and Central America ($178,000). »

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Luke will join Bruckheimer, Disney team

28 July 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

After portraying a football player in Friday Night Lights, Derek Luke is switching to basketball. The actor has signed on for the 1960s hoops drama Glory Road for producer Jerry Bruckheimer and the Walt Disney Co. Also joining the cast is The Day After Tomorrow's Austin Nichols. To be directed by James Gartner, Glory Road follows the true story of college basketball coach Don Haskins, whose all-black Texas Western team won the NCAA Men's Basketball Championship in 1966, beating an undefeated all-white Kentucky team. »

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French Fling for Dunst?

27 July 2004 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Hollywood starlet Kirsten Dunst reportedly had a fling with an unknown French actor shortly after her split with The Day After Tomorrow heart- throb Jake Gyllenhaal. Friends of the actress claim Dunst's Parisian romance occurred during the European press tour for Spider-Man 2 earlier this month. The brief affair was uneventful, as Dunst, 22, is now single again and is back in America filming Cameron Crowe's Elizabethtown in Kentucky alongside Orlando Bloom and Susan Sarandon, reports the Daily Dish website. »

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'Potter' helps U.K. summer b.o. sizzle

26 July 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

LONDON -- A boy wizard helped U.K. box office admissions rocket in June this year -- hitting 14.7 million, up from May's tally of 13.1 million -- according to figures released Monday by the Cinema Advertising Assn. Harry Potter & the Prisoner of Azkaban and The Day After Tomorrow hit the top two spots. Warner Bros' latest Potter outing, Prisoner of Azkaban snagged £36.9million ($67.9 million) by the end of June this year. Twentieth Century Fox's The Day After Tomorrow harnessed £14.6million ($26.9 million) over the month and beat out competition from Warner's Troy, which fought its way to £6 million ($11 million) and third spot in June. »

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Dunst Dumps Gyllenhaal

21 July 2004 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Hollywood beauty Kirsten Dunst has dumped her movie hunk boyfriend Jake Gyllenhaal, blaming "filming commitments". Spider-Man 2 actress Dunst and The Day After Tomorrow actor Gyllenhaal had been an item for two years before the surprise split two weeks ago. Since they began dating both Dunst and Gyllenhaal have become internationally famous, and Dunst's role in the Spider-Man movies has made her one of the most recognizable actresses in the world. An insider says, "Kirsten and Jake had been spending a lot of time apart because they both had filming commitments. But Jake was totally besotted with her and is devastated that she has broken up with him. Kirsten's career has sky rocketed. She's one of the hottest young actresses in Hollywood right now. She felt her relationship with Jake was emotionally draining and she couldn't cope with it on top of her work. It's very sad for Jake. He is really heartbroken." »

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Nachmanoff to join Col 'Nation'

20 July 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Screenwriter Jeffrey Nachmanoff is reteaming with director Roland Emmerich on One Nation for Columbia Pictures. The Day After Tomorrow scribe is in negotiations to pen the political thriller, which Emmerich is now attached to direct as well as produce through his Centropolis Entertainment banner. Dean Devlin, Emmerich's former producing partner, will co-produce through his Electric Entertainment shingle. Columbia Pictures' Matt Tolmach, Amy Baer and Shannon Gaulding will oversee for the studio. The project's plot line involves an impeached president who refuses to leave the White House. Meanwhile, an FBI agent is rushing to discover the truth behind a top-level conspiracy that threatens to undermine the Constitution. Nachmanoff's other writing credits include The Big Gig. Emmerich, Devlin and Centropolis are repped by CAA. Nachmanoff is repped by the Gersh Agency. »

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Spidey's overseas cume hits $200 million

20 July 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Despite a heat wave in Europe that sent many potential moviegoers to the beaches, Spider-Man 2 kept up a steady pace as it unleashed its third round of offshore openings, bringing in a hefty $62.2 million from 9,300 screens in 57 markets for a cume to date of $200.1 million. Earlier tentpole entries continued to maintain a strong presence overseas, with Shrek 2 accounting for a weekend gross of $24.9 million to lift its cume to $286.7 million and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban climbing to $434 million after a $19 million weekend. Fahrenheit 9/11 substantiated that the controversial documentary has a slew of foreign fans waiting, while 20th Century Fox appears to have another boxoffice hit in the making as I, Robot showed promise in a single Southeast Asia date, following the success of The Day After Tomorrow, which moved up to $341.2 million after being in the market for eight weeks. And King Arthur may outshine its domestic showing based on its first overseas steps. »

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The Vine: Moses back on Par's mountain?

13 July 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Cecil B. DeMille liked it so much he made it twice. Now, almost half a century later, Paramount Pictures is contemplating remounting The Ten Commandments yet again. It would be the third time around for the studio, which had a hand in the tale's previous incarnations. Mark Gordon is already on board to produce, and screenwriter Charles Randolph is about to meet with the studio about writing the biblical epic. While a new Moses movie could tap into some of the same religious fervor that blessed Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ at the boxoffice, Gordon and Randolph are believed to be interested in fashioning a serious, research-based treatment of the subject. Released in 1923, the first Commandments was a silent, mixed black-and-white footage with early Technicolor film and featured Theodore Roberts and Charles de Rochefort. DeMille revisited the epic as a 1956 feature starring Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner and Anne Baxter. That film was nominated for seven Academy Awards including best picture. Repped by CAA, Randolph's credits include Alan Parker's The Life of David Gale and The Interpreter, the Sydney Pollack-helmed feature starring Nicole Kidman and Sean Penn, which Randolph co-wrote with Scott Frank. Gordon's current projects include King Tut, Casanova, The Guide, The First Olympics and Killing Pablo. He also produced the recent hit The Day After Tomorrow. »

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Int'l boxoffice: 'Spidey 2,' 'Shrek 2' again main forces

13 July 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The tentpoles of summer once again lorded over the overseas boxoffice, with Spider-Man 2 and Shrek 2 in a head-to-head contest in attracting the most business over the weekend. In its first offshore appearances, which included the United Kingdom and France, Michael Moore's controversial Fahrenheit 9/11 displayed considerable boxoffice power as it started its international journey. And the holdover blockbusters Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, The Day After Tomorrow and Troy continued to swell their substantial international cumes. With 10 new territories coming on board over the weekend in the second wave of foreign dates, Spider-Man 2 spun a hefty web of $50.8 million from 6,720 screens in 46 markets, less than the Sunday estimate of $53 million. The overseas cume moved up to a weighty $113.9 million after two weekends of overseas release. »

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The Vine: Moses back on Par's mountain?

13 July 2004 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Cecil B. DeMille liked it so much he made it twice. Now, almost half a century later, Paramount Pictures is contemplating remounting The Ten Commandments yet again. It would be the third time around for the studio, which had a hand in the tale's previous incarnations. Mark Gordon is already on board to produce, and screenwriter Charles Randolph is about to meet with the studio about writing the biblical epic. While a new Moses movie could tap into some of the same religious fervor that blessed Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ at the boxoffice, Gordon and Randolph are believed to be interested in fashioning a serious, research-based treatment of the subject. Released in 1923, the first Commandments was a silent, mixed black-and-white footage with early Technicolor film and featured Theodore Roberts and Charles de Rochefort. DeMille revisited the epic as a 1956 feature starring Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner and Anne Baxter. That film was nominated for seven Academy Awards including best picture. Repped by CAA, Randolph's credits include Alan Parker's The Life of David Gale and The Interpreter, the Sydney Pollack-helmed feature starring Nicole Kidman and Sean Penn, which Randolph co-wrote with Scott Frank. Gordon's current projects include King Tut, Casanova, The Guide, The First Olympics and Killing Pablo. He also produced the recent hit The Day After Tomorrow. »

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