Playwright Tony Kushner adapts his political epic about the AIDS crisis during the mid-eighties, around a group of separate but connected individuals.
Reviews
Popularity
1,391 ( 68)

Watch Now

With Prime Video

WATCH NOW
ON DISC

Episodes

Seasons


Years



1   Unknown  
2003   Unknown  
Won 5 Golden Globes. Another 57 wins & 42 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 Roy Cohn (5 episodes, 2003)
...
 Harper Pitt (5 episodes, 2003)
...
 Belize / ... (5 episodes, 2003)
...
 Prior Walter / ... (5 episodes, 2003)
...
 Louis Ironson (5 episodes, 2003)
...
 Joe Pitt (5 episodes, 2003)
...
 Roy's Doctor (5 episodes, 2003)
...
 Ethel Rosenberg / ... (5 episodes, 2003)
...
 Nurse Emily / ... (5 episodes, 2003)
...
 Martin Heller (4 episodes, 2003)
...
 Mormon Mother (4 episodes, 2003)
Melissa Wilder ...
 Louis's Sister (4 episodes, 2003)
...
 Super (4 episodes, 2003)
Fatima Da Silva ...
 Cousin Doris (4 episodes, 2003)
Kevin 'Flotilla DeBarge' Joseph ...
 Singer in Church (4 episodes, 2003)
Sterling Brown ...
 Orderly (4 episodes, 2003)
...
 Louis' Mother (4 episodes, 2003)
Lisa LeGuillou ...
 Nurse (4 episodes, 2003)
...
 Louis' Father (4 episodes, 2003)
Shawn Bartels ...
 Mennonite Choir Members (4 episodes, 2003)
Brian Dougherty ...
 Mennonite Choir Members (4 episodes, 2003)
Mary Esbjornson ...
 Mennonite Choir Members (4 episodes, 2003)
Barbara Fusco ...
 Mennonite Choir Members (4 episodes, 2003)
Serafina Martino ...
 Mennonite Choir Members (4 episodes, 2003)
Steven Edward Moore ...
 Mennonite Choir Members (4 episodes, 2003)
Christopher Schuman ...
 Mennonite Choir Members (4 episodes, 2003)
Reldalee Wagner ...
 Mennonite Choir Members (4 episodes, 2003)
Matthew Yohn ...
 Mennonite Choir Members (4 episodes, 2003)
Edit

Storyline

God has abandoned Heaven. It's 1985: the Reagans are in the White House and Death swings the scythe of AIDS. In Manhattan, Prior Walter tells Lou, his lover of four years, he's ill; Lou bolts. As disease and loneliness ravage Prior, guilt invades Lou. Joe Pitt, an attorney who is Mormon and Republican, is pushed by right-wing fixer Roy Cohn toward a job at the Justice Department. Both Pitt and Cohn are in the closet: Pitt out of shame and religious turmoil, Cohn to preserve his power and access. Pitt's wife Harper is strung out on Valium, aching to escape a sexless marriage. An angel invites Prior to be a prophet in death. Pitt's mother and Belize, a close friend, help Prior choose. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The messenger has arrived.

Genres:

Drama | Fantasy | Romance

Certificate:

TV-MA | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

|

Language:

| | | |

Release Date:

7 December 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ameerika inglid  »

Box Office

Budget:

$60,000,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(6 parts)

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Kevin 'Flotilla DeBarge' Joseph, the drag queen who performs at the funeral that Belize and Prior attend, lip-syncs in that scene to Zella Jackson Price singing the song "I'm His Child" from the gospel music documentary Say Amen, Somebody (1982). See more »

Goofs

When Lou is saying kaddish for the dead Roy Cohn, Roy's mouth goes from open to closed to open again. See more »

Quotes

Prior: Are you a ghost, Lou?
Louis Ironson: No. Just spectral. Lost to myself. Sitting all day on cold park benches wishing I could be with you.
[Extends his arm]
Louis Ironson: Dance with me, babe.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Person Generally in Charge of Everything Aaron Geller See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Simpsons: Elementary School Musical (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Shall We Gather At The River?
(hymn written in 1864)
Music and Lyrics by Robert Lowry (1826-1899)
Performed by Meryl Streep and choir
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A Triumph In Every Way
29 March 2005 | by (Biloxi, Mississippi) – See all my reviews

Set in 1980s New York and subtitled "A Gay Fantasia on National Themes," the six-hour ANGELS IN America concerns a group of largely gay men who find themselves caught up in series of disasters that range from love to religion and from politics to philosophy--and most specifically caught between the rising tide of AIDS and a generally unsympathetic society.

In the midst of this, AIDS patient Prior Walter begins to have a series of visions, which may be fever dreams, medicine-induced hallucinations... or, most unnerving of all, real. His long dead ancestors rise to speak to him, the floor cracks open to reveal a burning book--and at the conclusion of the play's first half a beautiful woman with majestic wings crashes through his roof. She is the Angel of America. He is, she tells him, a prophet, and she has come to bring him a message for mankind.

Intertwined with Prior's other-earthly experiences are oddly parallel lives. Joe and Harper Pitt are a deeply dysfunctional couple doubting their faith in the Mormon Church, Joe a closeted homosexual, Harper a Valium-addicted and mildly psychotic woman given to visions as strange as those of Prior Walter's. And as further counterpoint historical figure Roy Cohn (1927-1986), among the most sinister figures of 20th Century America, finds himself taunted by the ghost of Ethel Rosenberg as he drifts toward his own AIDS-induced death. The characters swirl in and out of each other's lives and dreams, playing to stereotypes and yet defying them, arguing politics and philosophy and love and death--and it is fascinating stuff.

Although the play stunned 1990s audiences, most considered it utterly unfilmable due to both length and content. But this HBO-produced, Mike Nichols-directed version not only captures the power of the original, in some ways it improves upon it. Playwright Tony Kushner has adapted his work to the screen, rearranging certain problematic scenes and bits of dialogue to better effect, and certainly no one could argue with the cast, which is absolutely stunning in a series of multiple roles.

With a mad swirl of irony, intense drama, outrageous humor, and unexpected twists and turns, ANGELS IN America is almost sure to hold your attention--particularly if you recall the Ronald Reagan years well enough to recognize the truly bitter allegory the film offers on what many consider his largely absentee second term. Truly a must have, multi-layered, bearing repeated viewings, beautifully directed, performed, and filmed.

Gary F. Taylor, aka GFT, Amazon Reviewer


112 of 127 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?