6.0/10
374
19 user 7 critic

The Rutles 2: Can't Buy Me Lunch (2004)

PG-13 | | Comedy | TV Special 9 November 2004
Twenty-three years after the release of the original Rutles documentary, famous artists, actors and musicians speak out on how the Rutles influenced them.

Director:

Writer:

Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Narrator / Dirk McQuickly / Lady Beth Mouse-Peddler
Neil Innes ...
Ron Nasty (archive footage)
Ricky Fataar ...
Stig O'Hara (archive footage)
John Halsey ...
Barry Wom (archive footage)
...
Leggy Mountintaback (archive footage)
Mariela Comitini ...
Jennifer Lopez
Peter Crabbe ...
Police Officer
...
Melvin's Son
Tasha Goldthwait ...
Rutles Fan (as Tasha Goldthwaite)
...
The Jogger
Lily Idle ...
Rutles Fan
...
Martini (archive footage)
...
Bill Murray the K (archive footage)
...
Kevin Wongle
...
Astro Glide
Edit

Storyline

After sitting on a shelf at Warner Brothers for over a year, Rutles 2: Can't Buy Me Lunch, the much anticipated sequel to Eric Idle and Gerard Corvin's 1978 mockumentary, is finally on release, revealing the final exploits of The Rutles as they do a reunion tour of America. Documentor, Dirk McQuickly, interviews many artists and personalities who were inspired by the legendary band, from David Bowie to Tom Hanks. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

9 November 2004 (Hungary)  »

Also Known As:

Can't Buy Me Lunch: Another Look at the Rutles  »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$5,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Crazy Credits

No Executives were harmed during the making of this film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in What the Pythons Did Next... (2007) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

A Stale, Cheap, "Piggy in the Middle"
16 October 2007 | by See all my reviews

This sequel doesn't hold a candle to the original, in fact, at times the attempts at comedy are painful.

At times, the low-budget of the film, becomes more than just a joke, it is actually annoying. The film features washed out lighting, terrible audio and rough impromptu comedy that never delivers much punch. I think at times Idle doesn't even have a crew he just stands in front of a cheap video camera, recording himself. It's funny, but not funny enough, for the entire film to be carried that way.

It's so bad in spots, that you sometimes think someone could make a parody of how cheap, and fast Eric Idle can punch out product. A parody of the parody perhaps, that's about the only way this film could ever save itself. Monty Python has become so cliché and so formulaic now that it begs for parody the way Star Trek, super heroes and other stale icons of pop culture cry out for it.

That's what this sequel is I'm afraid, old, stale pop-culture that just rubber stamps old tricks and dishes it out in liberal, repetitive doses.

It's too bad. The original is brilliant. It is a quick, sharp, witty send-up of an era and an industry that needed a solid comedic thrashing. It spanked the rampant consumer hysteria and the fan boy worship of pop idols, but did it with a lot of love and affection for the music itself.

George Harrison once referred to the original Rutles film this way: "It was actually the best, funniest and most scathing. But at the same time, it was done with the most love." There's not a lot of love in the sequel, just some cheap, quick cameos, some running gags that never pay off and some really poor sound and video to look at.

While my admiration for Idle and Python remains, these guys have become stale. If this film taught me anything, it is that someone needs to make a "Rutles-like" documentary of Monty Python, to remind us all what made them great in the first place.


6 of 10 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 19 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

'Star Wars' Creatures We Love

"The IMDb Show" breaks down the origins of some iconic Star Wars creatures. Plus, legendary sword choreographer Tim Weske explains the basics of lightsaber combat.

Watch now