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Searching for Debra Winger (2002)

Rosanna Arquette talks to various actresses about the pressures they face as women working in the entertainment industry.

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Storyline

Rosanna Arquette informally interviews several contrasting actresses about how they cope with being a woman in the entertainment industry. The chauvenism of male crew is discussed, the pretentiousness / stereotyping of female characters in American film now. Interviews include those with Alley Sheedy, Martha Plimpton, Debra Winger, Emmanual Beart, and Rosanna's sister, Patricia Arquette -among others. Although a documentary this film seems affected, Arquette never has an argument, never says anything bad about another actress, in fact, complimenting just about everyone of them as being her favourite actress. Written by kerryn wedgwood

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Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

13 July 2002 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Buscando a Debra Winger  »

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Budget:

$600,000 (estimated)
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Screened as one of "out-of-competition" films at the Cannes Film Festival, May 2002. Director Rosanna Arquette says she made the documentary when she was struck by the fact that Debra Winger, who earned three Oscar nominations, had left the profession in her 30s. See more »

Quotes

Debra Winger: For me, when it started to be these schedules, like you get the script and you had to go to work in 4 weeks, 3 weeks, I got lost. It's like, what happened to my 3 months of preparation?
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Crazy Credits

Instead of saying a Rosanna Arquette film, it says a Rosanna Arquette Experience and instead of saying Directed by, it says Experienced by Rosanna Arquette. See more »

Connections

References An Officer and a Gentleman (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

Je T'adore
(Jaime Perkins)
Courtesy of Promusic, Inc.
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User Reviews

 
Surprisingly insightful
18 August 2003 | by (Milwaukee, WI) – See all my reviews

I actually just read about this documentary in Entertainment Weekly, so was surprised to see it on Showtime tonight. I was ready to slam it for being shallow, but was pleasantly surprised at its refreshing insights.

Rosanna Arquette directs this documentary about the role of women in Hollywood when they are no longer a starlet; the effects of age on the actress' career. What was most impressive about the documentary was the incredible number of actresses interviewed. From Sharon Stone to Martha Plimpton, Holly Hunter to Charlotte Rampling the many actresses (both fairly obscure and mainstream) express some interesting views without sounding like they are complaining about the `lack of strong roles for women' – a phrase that has become cliché. While I am not a fan of Salma Hayek in the least, she came across as very strong, voicing the need for female writers, directors, etc. (and backed up her word by doing that with Frida.)

Arquette's earthy style made the documentary flow very smoothly, and it was refreshing to see no pretensions. On many occasions, she very humbly expressed her adoration and respect for her subjects. She also put many of her interviewees together in groups which not only opened up the dialogue, but showed genuine camaraderie. Even Roger Ebert makes an appearance discussing how the movie going men tastes in movies have changed.

The one complaint I have is that I never really followed Arquette's vision. After listening to the amazing insights provided by actresses, I didn't see a clear correlation with the thesis.

Definitely worth a look, but definitely estrogen-laden so it may not be for all. But for someone who generally leans towards the `anti-Meg Ryan' films this was indeed interesting and thought provoking.

--Shelly


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