Mission: Impossible III
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A Note Regarding Spoilers

The following FAQ entries may contain spoilers. Only the biggest ones (if any) will be covered with spoiler tags. Spoiler tags have been used sparingly in order to make the page more readable.

For detailed information about the amounts and types of (a) sex and nudity, (b) violence and gore, (c) profanity, (d) alcohol, drugs, and smoking, and (e) frightening and intense scenes in this movie, consult the IMDb Parents Guide for this movie. The Parents Guide for Mission Impossible III can be found here.

Impossible Missions Force (IMF) agent Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise), retired from field work and currently training new recruits, learns that one of his trainees, Lindsey Farris (Keri Russell), who was following elusive black market arms dealer Owen Davian (Philip Seymour Hoffman), has disappeared, Ethan comes out of retirement to find her. When he and his team -- munitions expert Luther Strickell (Ving Rhames), aviation expert Declan Gormley (Jonathan Rhys Meyers), and communication operative Zhen Lei (Maggie Q) -- track down Davian and the mysterious 'rabbit's foot', Davian retaliates by kidnapping Ethan's new wife Julia (Michelle Monaghan).

No. Mission Impossible III is a sequel to Mission: Impossible (1996) and Mission: Impossible II (2000), which was based on a TV series also titled 'Mission: Impossible' that ran from 1966 to 1973 and was created and initially produced by American screenwriter Bruce Geller. Writing credits for MI-3 are credited to Alex Kurtzman, Roberto Orci, and J.J. Abrams (who also directed). MI-3 was followed by Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol (2011). Mission: Impossible 5 is scheduled for release in 2015.

The dialog didn't really have any meaning in the traditional sense, i.e., it was telling a ridiculous story. The purpose was to force Davian to pronounce commonly used syllables of speech to obtain a sample of his voice. When the sample was run through a computer program that Luther had, it created a base of Davian's voice pattern that Ethan could use with the voice modifying device on his throat to imitate Davian.

How does the movie end?

Using Musgrave's (Billy Crudup) cellphone and with the help of IMF technician Benji Dunn (Simon Pegg), Ethan tracks down the location of his last phone call. There, he finds Julia handcuffed and gagged with duct tape. Before he can set her free, however, Davian activates the bomb in Ethan's head, sending him reeling on the floor in pain. Davian then beats Ethan mercilessly, promising to kill Julia in front of him. Just as Davian reaches for his gun, Ethan manages to tackle him, and they both crash through a window to the street below, where Davian is hit by a truck and killed. With just minutes before the bomb in his head goes off, Ethan releases Julia, loosens power cables, and instructs her to electrocute him in order to deactivate the bomb. Julia does as told and, while Ethan lies dead on the floor, is forced to shoot Musgrave when he breaks into the room. Julia then performs CPR on Ethan, successfully resuscitating him. Taking the Rabbit's Foot with him, the two walk away as Ethan tells Julia about his job with the IMF. In the final scene, Ethan is back at headquarters. Brassel (Laurence Fishburne) congratulates him and alerts him to the fact that the White House has a possible mission for him. Before he leaves to go on his honeymoon with Julia, Ethan asks what is in the Rabbit's Foot, and Brassel promises to tell him if he will return to the IMF. Ethan promises to send a postcard, and then he and Julia walk off hand-in-hand.

The Rabbit's Foot was basically a MacGuffin - a device used to move the plot along. A MacGuffin usually doesn't require much of an explanation, because it has little bearing on the story. All the audience needs to know is that it's something very important or valuable and that all the players in the story are trying desperately to get their hands on it.

According to Carnahan in an interview on joblo.com:


"Danny Gilroy... and I wrote a script about private military and going into Africa and assassinating this West African premier and throwing this country into chaos. Ken Branagh was gonna play this guy based on Timothy Spicer, who was an SAS colonel, British army. And he retires and hes a billionaire two years later, because he puts his private military together and they go into Sierra Leone and they go, You got a problem with this rebel uprising? Will crush em. 15% of the copper mines, 10% of the diamond trade, etc. We were so far ahead of the curve, with private military... But we had it where it was geopolitical and really sharp. It would have been something else, dude." Source

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