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17 items from 2006


Dis profit doubles from 'Pirates'

10 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The Walt Disney Co. on Thursday reported a quarterly profit that more than doubled year-over-year as plunder from Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest kept sailing in.

The worldwide blockbuster helped Disney's studio entertainment division dominate in terms of revenue growth, followed by media networks, consumer products and parks and resorts.

The company earned $782 million in its fiscal fourth quarter, compared with $379 million a year ago. Revenue grew 14% to $8.8 billion.

Although the company beat Wall Street estimates on both metrics, encouraging one analyst to call the results "stellar," shares of Disney fell 2.1% in after-hours trading.

During the regular session, before results were released, Disney shares rose to a 52-week high of $33.58, which flirts with the stock's five-year high.

"Our positive view of Disney is reinforced by these results and trends," Goldman Sachs analyst Anthony Noto said.

Disney's studio, which four months ago slashed jobs, costs and movie output, posted a 33% rise in revenue to $2 billion. The unit showed operating income of $214 million, reversing last year's negative $313 million.

For the fiscal year, studio revenue fell 1% to $7.53 billion, but operating income soared 252% to $729 million, in part because of fewer domestic releases from Miramax.

Home entertainment results improved through lower marketing and distribution costs, even as the company sold fewer units. Standouts this year included The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the Cinderella Platinum Edition and Chicken Little. Last year's crop included The Incredibles, National Treasure and the Aladdin Platinum Edition.

Media Networks turned in a 10% revenue improvement to $3.7 billion and an 18% rise in operating income to $883 million. Cable, driven by ESPN, turned in a 16% revenue rise, while broadcasting clocked in with a 1% gain.

Disney singled out strong Touchstone sales because of higher international syndication revenue and DVD unit sales of Lost, Grey's Anatomy and Desperate Housewives as well as higher license fees for Scrubs.

During a conference call with analysts, Disney executives guided for continued double-digit growth for ESPN and touted the company's opportunities in digital media, video games and even music.

"We think we have created a very interesting formula to be successful in music. It's Disney-branded," Disney president and CEO Robert Iger said.

Currently, less than 10% of the growth of the studio is represented by the growth in music, leaving lots of room for improvement, chief financial officer Tom Staggs said.

"There's also a great synergy when it comes to music between the Disney Channel, Disney.com, Radio Disney and the Disney phone," Iger said. "And there will be very, very robust music offerings that, in effect, tie into one another across all those platforms."

While discussing music, Iger named Hannah Montana, That's So Raven, High School Musical and "The Suite Life of Zack and Cody."

The CEO also said Disney might be on the lookout for more low-cost acquisitions in the video game arena, but it would not be interested in buying anything too big.

"Our goal is to ultimately end up with a significant games business," he said.

He raved about Disney's efforts at selling movies and TV shows on the Internet and seemed especially bullish on the advertising model.

"We're expecting growth to come from multiple directions: from downloads and streams, from advertiser-supported experiences to purchases," he said.

Iger said ABC has seen 19 million requests for streams since May, and advertisers are paying up to reach the demographic, which skews younger and wealthier compared with the audience that watches the same shows on TV.

Recall rates "are tremendous," he said, citing a May experiment that showed that more than 85% of those who watched the streams remembered the advertiser.

He acknowledged that large DVD retailers had a problem with Disney offering movies through digital download, but said he intends to participate with the retailers' own initiatives in that regard when they launch their services.

"Clearly, the digital download initiatives, particularly movies, created some tension over issues like pricing and windowing," he said. "But we ultimately believe the tension is going to dissipate over time as we learn more about how the business is impacting the consumer."

Staggs also said the sale of Disney's ABC radio assets to Citadel Broadcasting Corp. will close in the first half of next year, though he also said that modifications might be in store to assist Citadel with financing. »

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Plunder from 'Pirates' propels Disney profit

10 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The Walt Disney Co. on Thursday reported a quarterly profit that more than doubled year-over-year as plunder from Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest kept sailing in.

The worldwide blockbuster helped Disney's studio entertainment division dominate in terms of revenue growth, followed by media networks, consumer products and parks and resorts.

The company earned $782 million in its fiscal fourth quarter, compared with $379 million a year ago. Revenue grew 14% to $8.8 billion.

Although the company beat Wall Street estimates on both metrics, encouraging one analyst to call the results "stellar," shares of Disney fell 2.1% in after-hours trading.

During the regular session, before results were released, Disney shares rose to a 52-week high of $33.58, which flirts with the stock's five-year high.

"Our positive view of Disney is reinforced by these results and trends," Goldman Sachs analyst Anthony Noto said.

Disney's studio, which four months ago slashed jobs, costs and movie output, posted a 33% rise in revenue to $2 billion. The unit showed operating income of $214 million, reversing last year's negative $313 million.

For the fiscal year, studio revenue fell 1% to $7.53 billion, but operating income soared 252% to $729 million, in part because of fewer domestic releases from Miramax.

Home entertainment results improved through lower marketing and distribution costs, even as the company sold fewer units. Standouts this year included The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the Cinderella Platinum Edition and Chicken Run. Last year's crop included The Incredibles, National Treasure and the Aladdin Platinum Edition.

Media Networks turned in a 10% revenue improvement to $3.7 billion and an 18% rise in operating income to $883 million. Cable, driven by ESPN, turned in a 16% revenue rise, while broadcasting clocked in with a 1% gain.

Disney singled out strong Touchstone sales because of higher international syndication revenue and DVD unit sales of Lost, Grey's Anatomy and Desperate Housewives as well as higher license fees for Scrubs.

During a conference call with analysts, Disney executives guided for continued double-digit growth for ESPN and touted the company's opportunities in digital media, video games and even music.

"We think we have created a very interesting formula to be successful in music. It's Disney-branded," Disney president and CEO Robert Iger said.

Currently, less than 10% of the growth of the studio is represented by the growth in music, leaving lots of room for improvement, chief financial officer Tom Staggs said.

"There's also a great synergy when it comes to music between the Disney Channel, Disney.com, Radio Disney and the Disney phone," Iger said. "And there will be very, very robust music offerings that, in effect, tie into one another across all those platforms."

While discussing music, Iger named Hannah Montana, That's So Raven, High School Musical and "The Suite Life of Zack and Cody."

The CEO also said Disney might be on the lookout for more low-cost acquisitions in the video game arena, but it would not be interested in buying anything too big.

"Our goal is to ultimately end up with a significant games business," he said.

He raved about Disney's efforts at selling movies and TV shows on the Internet and seemed especially bullish on the advertising model.

"We're expecting growth to come from multiple directions: from downloads and streams, from advertiser-supported experiences to purchases," he said.

Iger said ABC has seen 19 million requests for streams since May, and advertisers are paying up to reach the demographic, which skews younger and wealthier compared with the audience that watches the same shows on TV.

Recall rates "are tremendous," he said, citing a May experiment that showed that more than 85% of those who watched the streams remembered the advertiser.

He acknowledged that large DVD retailers had a problem with Disney offering movies through digital download, but said he intends to participate with the retailers' own initiatives in that regard when they launch their services.

"Clearly, the digital download initiatives, particularly movies, created some tension over issues like pricing and windowing," he said. "But we ultimately believe the tension is going to dissipate over time as we learn more about how the business is impacting the consumer."

Staggs also said the sale of Disney's ABC radio assets to Citadel Broadcasting Corp. will close in the first half of next year, though he also said that modifications might be in store to assist Citadel with financing. »

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Plunder from 'Pirates' propels Disney profit

10 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The Walt Disney Co. on Thursday reported a quarterly profit that more than doubled year-over-year as plunder from Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest kept sailing in. The worldwide blockbuster helped Disney's studio entertainment division dominate in terms of revenue growth, followed by media networks, consumer products and parks and resorts.

The company earned $782 million in its fiscal fourth quarter, compared with $379 million a year ago. Revenue grew 14% to $8.8 billion.

Although the company beat Wall Street estimates on both metrics, encouraging one analyst to call the results "stellar," shares of Disney fell 2.1% in after-hours trading.

During the regular session, before results were released, Disney shares rose to a 52-week high of $33.58, which flirts with the stock's five-year high.

"Our positive view of Disney is reinforced by these results and trends," Goldman Sachs analyst Anthony Noto said.

Disney's studio, which four months ago slashed jobs, costs and movie output, posted a 33% rise in revenue to $2 billion. The unit showed operating income of $214 million, reversing last year's negative $313 million.

For the fiscal year, studio revenue fell 1% to $7.53 billion, but operating income soared 252% to $729 million, in part because of fewer domestic releases from Miramax.

Home entertainment results improved through lower marketing and distribution costs, even as the company sold fewer units. Standouts this year included The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the Cinderella Platinum Edition and Chicken Little. Last year's crop included The Incredibles, National Treasure and the Aladdin Platinum Edition.

Media Networks turned in a 10% revenue improvement to $3.7 billion and an 18% rise in operating income to $883 million. Cable, driven by ESPN, turned in a 16% revenue rise, while broadcasting clocked in with a 1% gain.

Disney singled out strong Touchstone sales because of higher international syndication revenue and DVD unit sales of Lost, Grey's Anatomy and Desperate Housewives as well as higher license fees for Scrubs.

During a conference call with analysts, Disney executives guided for continued double-digit growth for ESPN and touted the company's opportunities in digital media, video games and even music.

"We think we have created a very interesting formula to be successful in music. It's Disney-branded," Disney president and CEO Robert Iger said.

Currently, less than 10% of the growth of the studio is represented by the growth in music, leaving lots of room for improvement, chief financial officer Tom Staggs said.

"There's also a great synergy when it comes to music between the Disney Channel, Disney.com, Radio Disney and the Disney phone," Iger said. "And there will be very, very robust music offerings that, in effect, tie into one another across all those platforms."

While discussing music, Iger named Hannah Montana, That's So Raven, High School Musical and "The Suite Life of Zack and Cody."

The CEO also said Disney might be on the lookout for more low-cost acquisitions in the video game arena, but it would not be interested in buying anything too big.

"Our goal is to ultimately end up with a significant games business," he said.

He raved about Disney's efforts at selling movies and TV shows on the Internet and seemed especially bullish on the advertising model.

"We're expecting growth to come from multiple directions: from downloads and streams, from advertiser-supported experiences to purchases," he said.

Iger said ABC has seen 19 million requests for streams since May, and advertisers are paying up to reach the demographic, which skews younger and wealthier compared with the audience that watches the same shows on TV.

Recall rates "are tremendous," he said, citing a May experiment that showed that more than 85% of those who watched the streams remembered the advertiser.

He acknowledged that large DVD retailers had a problem with Disney offering movies through digital download, but said he intends to participate with the retailers' own initiatives in that regard when they launch their services.

"Clearly, the digital download initiatives, particularly movies, created some tension over issues like pricing and windowing," he said. "But we ultimately believe the tension is going to dissipate over time as we learn more about how the business is impacting the consumer."

Staggs also said the sale of Disney's ABC radio assets to Citadel Broadcasting Corp. will close in the first half of next year, though he also said that modifications might be in store to assist Citadel with financing. »

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Iger 'bullish' on e-delivery of Dis media

20 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Less than a week after announcing its newest initiative with Apple Computer, the Walt Disney Co. has sold more than 125,000 feature film downloads via iTunes. "This is just the beginning," Disney CEO Robert Iger told Wall Street analysts at a conference Tuesday, predicting $50 million in revenue from the sale of movies through iTunes during the first year of the new partnership. Disney was the first to offer TV shows on iTunes a year ago, and last week it became the only studio to offer full-length movies, including such hits as The Incredibles and National Treasure. »

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Sony, Sandler 'Click' at top as 'Cars' cruises to 2nd

26 June 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Sony's Click controlled the boxoffice in North America this past weekend with a $40 million debut and the top spot. While the Adam Sandler starrer easily topped the charts at the boxoffice, the opening proved to be the fourth best for the comedian. On the flip side, the debut was Sandler's fifth film to open to $40 million or more. Columbia Pictures and Revolution Studios produced the PG-13-rated film, helmed by Frank Coraci, about a man who finds a television Remote Control that controls his life. Buena Vista's animated Cars found some traction at the boxoffice on its third lap in theaters, pulling into the pit in the second spot with $23.3 million -- some $800,000 better than early estimates. The G-rated Pixar film dropped a mild 31% from a week earlier, advancing the total cume to date to $156.7 million. Cars still lags The Incredibles and Finding Nemo at this same point of release, but just edged out Monsters, Inc., which had grossed $156.3 million by the end of its third weekend. »

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Disney/Pixar's 'Cars' laps field with $60 mil opening

13 June 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

While Buena Vista's Cars took its first lap at the boxoffice in the top spot this weekend, the seventh film from Pixar had less horsepower on opening weekend than the previous three releases from the highly esteemed animation company. Cars pulled into first place this weekend with $60.1 million, slightly less than the $62.8 million that was projected early Sunday morning. It's a well-known fact that the vast majority of films open woefully short of $60 million, but even so, Pixar has carved out an enviable track record through the years. But the company's last three films, The Incredibles ($70.5 million), Finding Nemo ($70.3 million), and Monsters, Inc. ($62.6 million), each opened better than Cars. Among all animated films, it was the seventh-biggest opening weekend of all time, and it was the fourth-best debut of the seven Pixar pictures. »

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'Cars' laps the competition

13 June 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

On its first lap in North American theaters, Buena Vista's Cars from Pixar put the pedal to the metal and as expected easily crossed the finish line in first place, cruising into the winners circle with an estimated $62.8 million -- the fifth-biggest opening of all-time for an animated film and third best for Pixar. But while the bow of the seventh picture from team Disney/Pixar proved a company best for the distributor in June, and a personal best for director John Lasseter and voice-over stars Owen Wilson and Paul Newman, it fell short of the debuts of the previous two Pixar releases. The Incredibles opened with $70.5 million and Finding Nemo swam off with $70.3 million -- the second- and third-biggest animated openings ever, respectively. DreamWorks' Shrek 2 owns the title for the largest animated opening in history with a staggering $108 million. Universal's surprise summer hit, The Break-Up, moved into the second spot with an estimated $20.5 million. The Vince Vaughn-Jennifer Aniston starrer, from director Peyton Reed, slipped a middling 48% on its sophomore frame, carrying the 10-day cume to an estimated $74.1 million. »

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'Cars' has Disney on side of road

12 June 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Shares of the Walt Disney Co. took an early swoon in trading Monday before partially recovering as Wall Street decided that the $62.8 million weekend opening of Cars amounted to an underperformance and investors digested an analyst downgrade. Many analysts had been expecting Cars to match the boxoffice of previous Disney-Pixar collaborations The Incredibles and Finding Nemo in its opening-weekend bow, though in both cases Cars fell more than $7 million short. That Cars is the first release of a Disney-Pixar film since the former acquired the latter means the film is under even more scrutiny than it would have been, some observers said. Disney acquired Pixar for $7.4 billion last month. Before its opening, many on Wall Street had anticipated a $270 million domestic run for Cars, though some Monday were predicting a bit less. »

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Disney/Pixar's 'Cars' laps field with $60 mil opening

12 June 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

While Buena Vista's Cars took its first lap at the boxoffice in the top spot this weekend, the seventh film from Pixar had less horsepower on opening weekend than the previous three releases from the highly esteemed animation company. Cars pulled into first place this weekend with $60.1 million, slightly less than the $62.8 million that was projected early Sunday morning. It's a well-known fact that the vast majority of films open woefully short of $60 million, but even so, Pixar has carved out an enviable track record through the years. But the company's last three films, The Incredibles ($70.5 million), Finding Nemo ($70.3 million), and Monsters, Inc. ($62.6 million), each opened better than Cars. Among all animated films, it was the seventh-biggest opening weekend of all time, and it was the fourth-best debut of the seven Pixar pictures. »

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'Cars' laps the competition

11 June 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

On its first lap in North American theaters, Buena Vista's Cars from Pixar put the pedal to the metal and as expected easily crossed the finish line in first place, cruising into the winners circle with an estimated $62.8 million -- the fifth-biggest opening of all-time for an animated film and third best for Pixar. But while the bow of the seventh picture from team Disney/Pixar proved a company best for the distributor in June, and a personal best for director John Lasseter and voice-over stars Owen Wilson and Paul Newman, it fell short of the debuts of the previous two Pixar releases. The Incredibles opened with $70.5 million and Finding Nemo swam off with $70.3 million -- the second- and third-biggest animated openings ever, respectively. DreamWorks' Shrek 2 owns the title for the largest animated opening in history with a staggering $108 million. »

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'Cars' laps the competition

11 June 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

On its first lap in North American theaters, Buena Vista's Cars from Pixar put the pedal to the metal and as expected easily crossed the finish line in first place, cruising into the winners circle with an estimated $62.8 million -- the fifth-biggest opening of all-time for an animated film and third best for Pixar. But while the bow of the seventh picture from team Disney/Pixar proved a company best for the distributor in June, and a personal best for director John Lasseter and voice-over stars Owen Wilson and Paul Newman, it fell short of the debuts of the previous two Pixar releases. The Incredibles opened with $70.5 million and Finding Nemo swam off with $70.3 million -- the second- and third-biggest animated openings ever, respectively. DreamWorks' Shrek 2 owns the title for the largest animated opening in history with a staggering $108 million. Universal's surprise summer hit, The Break-Up, moved into the second spot with an estimated $20.5 million. The Vince Vaughn-Jennifer Aniston starrer, from director Peyton Reed, slipped a middling 48% on its sophomore frame, carrying the 10-day cume to an estimated $74.1 million. »

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'Cars' to also-rans: Eat my dust

9 June 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, dudes and dudettes, start your engines. That introduction can only mean that Buena Vista Pictures' Cars, from Pixar Animation Studios, is racing into theaters today. The highly anticipated seventh film from the Walt Disney Co./Pixar team is in 3,985 venues -- including a record 210 digital screens -- and is expected to easily take the checkered flag in the top spot. John Lasseter directed Cars, a G-rated tale that features talking cars and trucks and a race car named Lightning McQueen. Lending their voices to the colorful cast of CG-animated vehicles are Owen Wilson, Paul Newman, Bonnie Hunt, Larry the Cable Guy, Cheech Marin and racing great Richard Petty. The debut of Cars marks the first release from Disney and Pixar in more than a year and a half, so there is some pent-up demand for the film. Disney/ Pixar's The Incredibles opened in November 2004 with $70 million and finished with $261 million. »

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'Cars' to also-rans: Eat my dust

8 June 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, dudes and dudettes, start your engines. That introduction can only mean that Buena Vista Pictures' Cars, from Pixar Animation Studios, is racing into theaters today. The highly anticipated seventh film from the Walt Disney Co./Pixar team is in 3,985 venues -- including a record 210 digital screens -- and is expected to easily take the checkered flag in the top spot. John Lasseter directed Cars, a G-rated tale that features talking cars and trucks and a race car named Lightning McQueen. Lending their voices to the colorful cast of CG-animated vehicles are Owen Wilson, Paul Newman, Bonnie Hunt, Larry the Cable Guy, Cheech Marin and racing great Richard Petty. The debut of Cars marks the first release from Disney and Pixar in more than a year and a half, so there is some pent-up demand for the film. Disney/ Pixar's The Incredibles opened in November 2004 with $70 million and finished with $261 million. »

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Bird catches 'Ratatouille' for Pixar pic

13 March 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Pixar Animation Studios' Brad Bird will direct Ratatouille, the computer-animated mouse tale that was developed in-house by the studio's Oscar-winning short-film director Jan Pinkava (Geri's Game). The deal was confirmed Friday at the Disney shareholders meeting in Anaheim. The story centers on a skinny rodent who fancies himself a gourmand and lives in a Parisian restaurant. A sneak peek of the film, with fully rendered CG characters, was introduced by John Lasseter and shown to attendees at Friday's meeting. It was expected that Pinkava would direct the project, and Bird was said to be developing a sequel to his 2004 Oscar-winning film The Incredibles. Execs also confirmed at the meeting that Glen Keane's directorial debut, Rapunzel, remains in the early stages of production utilizing a combination of 2-D and 3-D processes. Ratatouille is the eighth animated feature film produced by Pixar. It is scheduled for release June 29, 2007. »

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Pixar Q4 down but tops Street

8 March 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Pixar Animation Studios, which Tuesday reported its quarterly earnings probably for the last time before becoming part of the Walt Disney Co., beat its own guidance and the expectations of Wall Street analysts. Leaning heavily on home video and worldwide TV rights to Finding Nemo as well as on consumer products and global DVD sales of The Incredibles, Pixar posted a fourth-quarter profit of $30.9 million on $55.6 million revenue. While down from year-ago results of $55.2 million earned on $108.9 million revenue, analysts had expected Pixar to post earnings of only $20.8 million on $44.7 million in revenue. »

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Hunter Gives Birth to Twins

19 January 2006 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Academy Award-winning actress Holly Hunter has given birth to twins, her first children with actor partner Gordon MacDonald. Hunter's arrivals were confirmed by her publicist who told People magazine, "She had the babies. They are happy and healthy." Further details about the twins have yet to be revealed. The 47-year-old star of The Piano and The Incredibles met MacDonald in November 2004 when they co-starred in a play on London's West End. Hunter was previously married for six years to cinematographer Janusz Kaminski. »

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'D' top score in Hong Kong

2 January 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

HONG KONG -- A Christmas push from a boy wizard and a giant ape failed to push Media Asia's Initial D off the top rung of Hong Kong's 2005 boxoffice chart, according to figures released by the Hong Kong, Kowloon and New Territories Motion Picture Industry Assn. Harry Potter knocked Pixar's The Incredibles off its second spot with $4.48 million after 10 days of release, while King Kong lumbered into fourth place with $3.92 million. Both Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and King Kong are still in release. Tom Cruise's War of the Worlds managed fifth place with $3.02 million, just slightly ahead of Mr & Mrs Smith which took $2.98 million. These were followed by Howl's Moving Castle, Madagascar and Constantine. »

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004

17 items from 2006


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