7.3/10
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1 user 1 critic

A Death in the Family (1987)

Andy is dying. His friends in Auckland care for him through his last days.

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Cast

Credited cast:
Rosie Baysting ...
Baby
Georgina Beyer ...
Friend
Jon Brazier ...
Simon
Bernadette Doolan ...
Maureen
Ray Edkins ...
Paul
Nancy Flyger ...
Mum
Paul Gittins ...
Cal
Nigel Harbrow ...
Matt
Derek Hardwick ...
Dad
Vivienne Laube ...
Ursula, the Doctor
Murray Lynch ...
Friend
Elizabeth McRae ...
Aunty Pam
Simon Prast ...
Ben
Harold Samu ...
Friend
Patrick Smith ...
Tim
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Andy is dying. His friends in Auckland care for him through his last days.

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Genres:

Drama

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21 October 1987 (USA)  »

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User Reviews

 
understated portrait of shared grief
13 November 2010 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

That such an intimate, near silent drama could be so powerful says something about the very human tragedy of the film's title: this isn't strictly a movie about AIDS, but a story of mortality and survival and the ways in which people draw strength from each other during moments of crisis. While Andrew Boyd (only the fourth person in New Zealand to contract the disease) lies helpless and dying, a small circle of his gay friends care for him and await the arrival of Andrew's relatives: stern, conservative Christians from the suburbs. Andrew has been given only five days to live, but the deathwatch stretches to seven, then nine, then thirteen days, while the sharing of pain and compassion enables both 'families' to overcome their respective prejudices and slowly come to terms with each other. The co-directors should be commended for tackling a sensitive issue in such a subdued but eloquent style, avoiding mawkish sentiment by understating the obvious emotional impact of the story and letting the ordeal speak for itself.


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