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IndieWire Stands With Women: 27 TV Shows Created by Women, Starring Women, That We Absolutely Love

  • Indiewire
IndieWire Stands With Women: 27 TV Shows Created by Women, Starring Women, That We Absolutely Love
Today is not only International Women’s Day, but a day when many are choosing to strike for A Day Without Women, an economic protest to remind the nation just how important women’s contributions to society are. And as part of that, IndieWire has assembled a powerful list of shows, all currently streaming online, that would not exist without the brilliant female creators at their center. This is the great TV that happens when women show up. Don’t take it for granted.

“30 Rock” (NBC, Netflix)

Did we fully appreciate the gift we had in Tina Fey’s absurdist take on life behind the scenes of a sketch comedy show, while it was on the air? Maybe not, but here’s what matters: “30 Rock” was one of the most original, bizarre, hilarious and unapologetically female shows of its time, and it holds up damn well.

Broad City” (Comedy Central,
See full article at Indiewire »

IndieWire Stands With Women: 27 TV Shows Created by Women, Starring Women, That We Absolutely Love

IndieWire Stands With Women: 27 TV Shows Created by Women, Starring Women, That We Absolutely Love
Today is not only International Women’s Day, but a day when many are choosing to strike for A Day Without Women, an economic protest to remind the nation just how important women’s contributions to society are. And as part of that, IndieWire has assembled a powerful list of shows, all currently streaming online, that would not exist without the brilliant female creators at their center. This is the great TV that happens when women show up. Don’t take it for granted.

“30 Rock” (NBC, Netflix)

Did we fully appreciate the gift we had in Tina Fey’s absurdist take on life behind the scenes of a sketch comedy show, while it was on the air? Maybe not, but here’s what matters: “30 Rock” was one of the most original, bizarre, hilarious and unapologetically female shows of its time, and it holds up damn well.

Broad City” (Comedy Central,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

18 Star Trek screen projects that never happened

Across film and TV, there have been many Star Trek projects that never got the greenlight. Such as these...

Since 1964 (yep) there have been Star Trek projects that simply didn't make it to the big or small screen. And before Star Trek's second (proper) coming in 1979's Star Trek: The Motion Picture, the franchise had more than its fair share of attempts to come to life, and then be reborn.

This lot in fact...

Star Trek – The (original) Original Series

Here's a thought – the original Star Trek series wasn't supposed to be the original Star Trek series.

The pilot that sold the show to NBC was in fact the second pilot, after the original, entitled The Cage, filmed at the end of 1964, was deemed too cerebral. That's on top of having other multiple issues that TV executives (and test audiences) of the time couldn't cope with – you know, like gender equality in the workplace.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The artists' artist TV drama writers

Five leading TV drama writers choose their favourite peer

Ashley Pharoah on Paul Abbott

I first noticed Paul Abbott's name on the credits of Cracker in 1994. What immediately excited me was that his dark, sharp insights existed so brilliantly within a genre setting. Back then, series writers were on the bottom rungs of the television industry – the kudos tended to go to one-off dramas. Paul changed all that.

Some writers write the same thing all their lives. Paul has moved from the dark thrillers of Touching Evil to the gloomy strangeness of The Secret World of Michael Fry, to Shameless. Watching the News Corp saga unfold, it's been hard not to think of State of Play, perhaps his greatest work to date: a dark and emotional take on our newspapers and the society they feed.

His love of storytelling is ever-present, and he plies his talent in the brutal world of the ratings-obsessed mainstream,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

"Torchwood"'s Russell T Davies Makes No Apologies — For Anything

Killing a beloved character on a television show is always a dicey proposition when it comes to how fans will react to the death. When that character is not only one of the few prominent gay characters on TV, but is also one of the only ones in a positive same-sex relationship, the risk of a backlash is that much greater.

So when Torchwood's Ianto Jones (Gareth David-Lloyd) unexpectedly perished in the fourth episode of the recent Children of Earth miniseries, the reaction among many gay fans was almost instantaneous &#8212 not to mention less than positive. Some felt betrayed that Ianto had died at all, some found his death upsetting because it was seemingly so senseless, while others were simply upset that yet another gay character on television had come to an untimely end.

But Russell T Davies, the man responsible for the death of Jones, felt no remorse
See full article at The Backlot »

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