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The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005) Poster

Trivia

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Took five years to make.
The film required 2.8 tons of Plasticine in 42 colors and 1000 baby-wipes per week to wipe it off animators' fingers.
The pet name "Totty" is also English slang for a desirable woman.
In Wallace"s bookcase there are several titles which refer to cheese. They are "The Hunt For Red Leicester", "Brighton Roquefort", "How Green Was My Cheese", "Brie Encounter", "Swiss Cheese Family Robinson", "East of Edam", "Grated Expectations", "Fromage to Eternity", and "Waiting for Gouda".
The greenhouse in Lady Campanula Tottington's house is made of real glass. Her gardens feature 100 types of trees and plants and 700 varieties of vegetable.
The movie contains a considerable amount of CGI of all kinds, from drifting fog through to the bunny rabbits in the Bun-Vac. In all, there are over 700 shots that contain some kind of digital effects work.
When the film was released in Portland, Dorset, UK, the posters had to be altered to remove the word "rabbit". There is a local superstition that prohibits the use of this word (they use terms such as "underground mutton" or "furry things" instead) because burrowing can cause dangerous landslips in the local stone quarrying industry. The film posters in Portland use the alternative slogan "Something bunny is going on."
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Entries in the Vicar's Monster Book are jokes: 1) "touristis trappus" for the Loch Ness Monster (joke about it being a major tourist attraction) ; 2) "enormious flippis-floppus" for the Bigfoot; 3) "numerous pendulus udderis" for the Were-Cow ; 4) "carrotus appetitus giganticus" for the Were-Rabbit.
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One of two stop-motion animated films in 2005. The other was Corpse Bride (2005), and in a peculiar coincidence, Helena Bonham Carter has a prominent role in both. In a further coincidence, both films have a subplot about a snobby suitor trying to cash in by the act of marriage.
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Nick Park and Steve Box referred to The Curse of the Were-Rabbit as the world's first vegetarian horror film.
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At the end of the movie when Wallace has turned back into himself, Gromit uses a box to cover up the fact that Wallace doesn't have any clothes on. If you look closely at the box, a sticker on it says "May contain nuts".
The Were-Rabbit had an internal mechanism that allowed the animators to move the model with minimal touching of the fur covering, thus avoiding the tell-tale impressions left by their fingers.
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The name of Wallace & Gromit's pest control company is a triple pun. "Anti-pesto", aside from the obvious pest control pun, also refers to "antipasto," which is an assortment of Italian appetizers (including vegetables) and to "pesto," a sauce-base made up mainly of basil, garlic, oil and, of course, cheese.
Even before the release of the film, the only producer of Stinking Bishop cheese in the world had their orders increase over 500%. The producer only makes 22 tons of the cheese annually and has no intention to grow in size.
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The vegetable shop that the were-rabbit attacks is named "Harvey's." Its name is taken from Harvey (1950), the play and movie (starring James Stewart) about a man who befriends a six-foot-tall invisible rabbit named Harvey.
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Gromit rolls his eyes 13 times in the movie, usually because of Wallace.
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During filming, Aardman managed an average of 3 seconds of usable footage per day.
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Nick Park admits that Wallace bears a resemblance to his father.
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Lady Campanula Tottington is named after Nick Park's favorite flowers (campanula).
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During the scene where Victor chases the were-rabbit through the town's back gardens, there is a poster on one of the walls for a show called "Rock around the Crop" featuring Carl Gherkins (Carl Perkins) and Roy Aubergine (Roy Orbison).
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Movie posters on the walls of the town include "Spartichoke" (a take-off on Spartacus (1960)), "Carrot on a Hot Tin Roof," and "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner Bean."
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Lady Tottingham is continually dressed as different vegetables throughout the film. A carrot at the fair, a piece of corn at the end of the movie (of course, when it's at its most "corny").
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The 24-carat trophy joke was a last minute addition. It was originally a silver trophy, since traditionally silver bullets kill a werewolf.
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To prepare the Aardman animators for animating the Wallace and Gromit characters and world, ten short films were made by the various animating teams. They were released online under the title Wallace & Gromit's Cracking Contraptions (2002); the first, "Soccamatic", was a free download, but the other nine were only available by subscribing or by ordering the DVD.
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All the wallpaper created for the sets are entirely hand-painted.
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Sounds of real Austin A35 van were recorded, including the sound of its doors and windscreen wipers.
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Shortly after this film was released, the Aardman warehouse in Bristol, England burned to the ground, destroying hundreds of plasticine characters and sets, virtually the entire history of the company. Nick Park was quoted as saying, "Even though it is a precious and nostalgic collection and valuable to the company, in light of other tragedies, today isn't a big deal."
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The Were-Rabbit model broke three times at the climax.
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At one point, Wallace is reading a magazine called "Ay-Up!", a spoof of celebrity-spotting magazine Hello! Ay-up is regional greeting, mainly in the north of England.
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Hutch only speaks phrases spoken by Wallace previously in the movie and preceding short films.
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Each character needed several versions to cover a range of emotions and poses. There were 43 versions of Gromit, 35 Wallaces, 16 Victor Quartermaines and 15 Lady Tottingtons, as well as 20 differently shaped mouths. A single line of dialog of only a few words could take a whole day to animate.
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There were 30 miniature sets.
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During one shot, where the camera pulls out of the vicar's room where he keeps his occult objects, there are two portraits briefly visible on the wall. The people in the pictures are the two directors, Nick Park and Steve Box.
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Despite being a DreamWorks production, the film was made at Aardman's studio in Bristol, like all of the other Wallace & Gromit films.
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Peter Sallis' voice was speeded-up for the voice of Hutch the Rabbit.
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The license plate of the Anti-Pesto van is "HOP 21T", which can be read "Hop to it".
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The Victor Quartermaine character was once known as Tristrum, and was originally written into the script as Lady Tottington's son.
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The Latin motto of the Tottington family inscribed on the manor house translates roughly as "Manure Liberates Us All". (It was originally meant to be "Free Manure for Everyone").
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Special software had to be created in order to photo-realistically recreate the texture of genuine Aardman plasticine in the computer. The software had to create the possibility for slight imperfections, e.g., fingerprints to appear on the fake plasticine bunnies and ripple effects of the characters moving their plasticine arms and legs.
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The crew used 44 pounds of glue every month to assist in sticking down the sets.
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During the character design phase, the look of Lady Tottington changed as many as 40 times.
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Nick Park wanted the DreamWorks logo to play an epic theme, like something akin to Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (1977). He wanted audiences to think that Aardman had sold out to Hollywood, before the film reverts to the classic Wallace & Gromit theme over the opening credits. The intro was also one of the last scenes filmed.
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Ray Harryhausen, the famous stop-motion director paid a visit to the set.
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Scottish animator Mark Flood revealed that this film was what inspired him to become an animator.
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WILHELM SCREAM: The were-rabbit steps on a villager after picking up Lady Tottingham.
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DreamWorks wanted Aardman to replace Peter Sallis, the voice of Wallace since the first animated short, with a well-known actor that American audiences would recognize. According to Entertainment Weekly, they politely but firmly refused; instead, they got Ralph Fiennes and Helena Bonham Carter to play roles.
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The tax disk on the full size version of the van shows the color of the van as being "Preston Green." This name was decided upon by the Art Director and one of the founders of the International Austin A30/A35 Register in honor of Nick Park's home town of Preston, Lancashire, England. It is also a reference to the ferocious dog in A Close Shave (1995).
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The entire feature production crew consisted of 250 people.
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Aardman collaborated with the UK based International Austin A30/A35 Register (aka Flying-A.net) to produce a road version of the model van for promotional purposes. Based on a 1964 Austin A35 van, the full size vehicle was fully restored then subjected to a painstakingly careful battering, rusting and discolouring to faithfully reproduce the dents and scrapes as seen in the movie. The work was completed in six weeks.
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The code for Gromit's High-Security greenhouse is "8425", which can spell "Halt" on a telephone. Note: later on the "8" is not punched.
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The grass is made from fun fur imported from the USA.
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On average, each character got a new pair of eyes every two months.
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When Lady Tottington wants the Were-Rabbit to escape, she says "Run, rabbit, run!" Which is the title (and lyric) of a ditty written by Noel Gay and Ralph Butler for Noel's show, "The Little Dog Laughed". WWII era comedy duo Bud Flanagan and Chesney Allen made the song popular by adding lyrics referring to Adolf Hitler. PC Mac whistled this song during the original version of the opening sequence (see "Deleted Scenes" on the DVD).
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The line "Run, rabbit, run!" is also a reference to the song "Breathe/In The Air" from Pink Floyd's Dark Side Of The Moon album.
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Next door to Harvey's Vegetable Shop, is a barbershop called, "A Close Shave," which is also the name of an Oscar-winning animated short starring Wallace and Gromit.
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While putting an electric blanket over his prize melon, Gromit plays a record from an album called "The Plant Suite". The music playing is actually "Venus" from "The Planet Suite" by Gustav Holst. (Next to the "Plant Suite" album cover, there is another record visible. It is "Blue Suede Shoes" by "Elvis Parsley" on "P.E.A. Records" - a pun on R.C.A. Records.)
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Referring to the film's obsession with vegetables, the tag-line of the newspaper The Morning Post is "The paper with the finger on the pulses".
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When Gromit is making Wallace's breakfast, there are jars of Mummies (Daddies) Sauce and Middle-Aged Spread on the table.
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The vicar's name is never mentioned throughout the film. We only find out that it is Reverend Clement Hedges on the end credits.
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The Were-Rabbit attacking the vicar was the first scene shot.
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The church scene with all the villagers was meant to homage the meeting scene in Jaws (1975), where the people of Amity Bay are discussing how to deal with the shark.
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The Were-Rabbit required several models. The animators were glad not to have to work with clay because it meant less work when designing it, but working with fur proved just as time-consuming.
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When Gromit is listening to the radio in the van after the fake giant bunny is knocked off the roof, one of the songs heard is "Bright Eyes", from the animated feature Watership Down (1978), also a movie about rabbits in England.
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During closeups of the character's faces it is possible to see tiny holes in the center of the pupils of the eyes. These were used to position the eyes by inserting a small pin and moving the eyes.
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Victor Quartermaine is Wallace and Gromit's first human antagonist.
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The van that Wallace drives in the movie is an Austin A35, made by the Austin Motor company from the late-50's to 1968.
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The author's name on the front of the monster encyclopedia that Reverend Hedges shows to Quartermaine is "Claude Savagely".
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The rune stones shown in the vicar's cupboard when retrieving the golden bullets represent harvest and defense.
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Stage lights were used for filming rather than film lights because they are smaller and easier to control. During the course of the production over 900 lamps were used.
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Torch bulbs and other small lamps were used as "practical" lights on the sets and over 15,000 were used on the fairground.
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Voted number 25 in channel 4's (UK) "Greatest Family Films"
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At the fairground, there's a little notice in front of the Hot Dog stand that says "Hot Dogs, and Cats and Burgers", a reference to DreamWorks Animation CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg.
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The church stained-glass window that the were-rabbit leaps through depicts Saint George, the patron saint of England, fighting a dragon.
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Features more human characters than the previous short films did.
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The sticker on the back window of the Anti-Pesto van reads, "Eat more cheese. Ask me how."
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Lord Victor Quartermaine is named after Allan Quatermain, the fictional big game hunter created by H. Rider Haggard in the novel 'King Solomon's Mines'.
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A closed-down antiques shop in the town is called "Rare Bits," a reference to "rarebit," a Welsh form of melted cheese.
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When Gromit is making the reinforced hutch for Hutch, he uses a rivet-gun with the name Botch (Bosch) on the side.
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When Lady Tottingham brings Wallace to her "inner sanctum" she refers to it as "a place no man has ever seen" that is her "secret garden" - a likely reference to the book "My Secret Garden" by Nancy Friday.
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The four waveband buttons on the radio in the Anti Pesto car, which normally bear the letters L (long wave), M (medium wave), S (short wave) and F (FM), are respectively M, U, T, T - a reference to the main driver of the car being Gromit, a mutt (dog).
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All of the scenes with water were done with CGI.
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Before Gromit flies a coin-operated biplane at the climax, it was originally dodgems he and Philip had a fight in. Gromit also flew a plane in A Close Shave, and the joke where the money runs out while in the middle of a fight was lifted from A Grand Day Out (1989), when a coin operated oven/cooker is about to hit Wallace with a truncheon, before the money runs out mid-swing.
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Mrs Mulch resembles Liz Smith, the actress providing the voice for her.
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PC Mackintosh's first name in the script is Albert.
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The first Wallace & Gromit film with a supernatural theme. All of the others are science-fictional, or are about crime.
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The script originally had Wallace use the Mind-Manipulation-O-Matic to restore Hutch's taste for vegetables, and his taste for cheese.
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

When Gromit operates the female "were-rabbit," he is accidentally thrown into the top of the van. If you look at the impression he leaves in the van's roof, there is also a spring (broken) in a very funny position, making the indent look like a male rabbit.
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Wallace's transformation into the Were-Rabbit was one of Nick Park's favourite sequences, just to see Wallace beat up the villain. Park also liked the way Wallace's personality shines through the Were-Rabbit in some scenes.
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Near the end, after the Were-Rabbit has fallen from the roof onto the table of cream crackers, it turns back into Wallace. Originally Nick Park had intended that Wallace would retain his rabbit ears, and only lose them after another session with the Mind Manipulation-omatic. Consequently he filmed this scene with the rabbit ears attached to Wallace's head. When the ending was changed, he decided that he would use CGI to remove the rabbit ears from the film and replace them with Wallace's own ears, rather than re-filming that whole scene. Similarly, in earlier shots of Hutch sliding down the chute from his bed to the basement after Gromit has raised the alarm, Park used CGI to remove Gromit from the adjacent chute after the story was changed at this point.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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