During the early 16th Century idealistic German monk Martin Luther, disgusted by the materialism in the church, begins the dialogue that will lead to the Protestant Reformation.

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4 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Girolamo Aleander
Claire Cox ...
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Frederick the Wise (as Sir Peter Ustinov)
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Maria Simon ...
Hanna
Lars Rudolph ...
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Ulrick
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von der Eck
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Storyline

Biography of Martin Luther, the 16th-century priest who led the Christian Reformation and opened up new possibilities in exploration of faith. The film begins with his vow to become a monk, and continues through his struggles to reconcile his desire for sanctification with his increasing abhorrence of the corruption and hypocrisy pervading the Church's hierarchy. He is ultimately charged with heresy and must confront the ruling cardinals and princes, urging them to make the Scriptures available to the common believer and lead the Church toward faith through justice and righteousness. Written by scgary66

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Taglines:

Rebel. Genius. Liberator.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for disturbing images of violence | See all certifications »

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Details

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Language:

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Release Date:

26 September 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Lutero  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

€21,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$908,446 (USA) (26 September 2003)

Gross:

$5,667,046 (USA) (21 November 2003)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Co-produced by 'Thrivent Financial for Lutherans', an American company affiliated with Lutheran church organizations, primarily the two largest national U.S. Lutheran Church organizations (The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and The Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod). Thrivent is a component of the "Fortune 500," the 500 largest companies headquartered in the United States, but it is the only not-for-profit organization/company which is a component of the Fortune 500 because it is a members only company, serving the congregants of Lutheran churches in the U.S., operating much like a members only credit union or mutual (meaning owned by its members) insurance company. See more »

Goofs

The position of Emperor Charles V's right hand changes between shots from his face and to his chair when he is on the throne. See more »

Quotes

Frederick the Wise: It's so irritating. Who are they to deprive my university of such a fine mind?
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Connections

Version of Martin Luther (1983) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Great Emotional Film - One of This Year's Best!
30 October 2003 | by (ST. Louis, MO USA) – See all my reviews

Martin Luther is without a doubt one of the most important figures in Western Civilization. His actions not only reformed Christianity, but also shaped the direction in which Europe developed and opened the door for additional reform and individual freedoms. "Luther" the movie does a fine job at highlighting Luther's actions prior to and during the Reformation.

"Luther" is a very rich movie to say the least. The costumes, scenery, music, acting, and characters all compliment the film nicely. Joseph Fiennes turns in a fine performance portraying Luther and making the audience both admire and feel pity for him throughout the film (the sticklers to realism just have to forgive the fact that Fiennes and Luther do not look very much alike). All the supporting roles were well done as well, especially Peter Ustinov as Prince Friedrich and Uwe Ochsenknecht (say that name three times fast!) as Pope Leo.

Personally as a Lutheran, I was very pleased to see the movie focus mainly on Luther's scriptural interpretations and 95 Theses rather than solely on the secular politics of the time. Thankfully, the creators of "Luther" do not tip-toe around including and expressing Christian messages as to "not offend" non-Christian viewers. If anything, all the direct references to the Bible and doctrine may win people over by showing just how much Martin Luther was a model of Christianity through his love of God and strict belief in only the scriptures (and not unjust rules of men). All that he used to battle the ridiculous man made ordinances and general corruption of the 16th century Catholic Church.

The only things I can really pick apart in "Luther" is the ending - I just wish the ending was slightly more rounded than it is, it seemed that things were sped up in the last 1/4 of the film and then it kind of ended abruptly. Nonetheless, the ending was still very emotional and made me want to stand up and applaud. I highly recommend this film to those wishing to learn more about Luther, the Reformation, or even just basic Christianity. But keep in mind, at times this film is violent. But the violence is used sparingly and only to drive home some important points in the film (such as Luther's despair over feeling responsible for so many gruesome deaths). All in all, this is a very emotional film which works on so many levels and it was a great pleasure to watch.


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