6.3/10
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301 user 141 critic

Down with Love (2003)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Romance | 16 May 2003 (USA)
In 1962 New York City, love blossoms between a playboy journalist and a feminist advice author.

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4 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Gladys
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Maurice
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E.G.
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C.B.
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J.B.
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J.R.
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R.J.
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Yvette
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Elkie
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Storyline

An homage to the early 1960s sex comedies that starred Rock Hudson and Doris Day. The story follows a best-selling female advice author who has all the answers until a sly journalist playboy starts asking the questions. Written by Natalie Knowles <NatSplat007@hotmail.com>

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Plot Keywords:

book | author | sex | playboy | maine | See All (116) »

Taglines:

The ultimate catch has met his match.

Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sexual humor and dialogue | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Release Date:

16 May 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Abajo el amor  »

Box Office

Budget:

$35,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$45,029 (USA) (9 May 2003)

Gross:

$20,298,207 (USA) (25 July 2003)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

During the dating montage, one of the scenes in the background is of a man playing bongo drums. This footage is taken from the scene in Pillow Talk (1959) when Doris Day's and Rock Hudson's characters first meet. See more »

Goofs

Barbara's desk phone in her office at Now magazine has a modular handset cord, which did not exist in 1962. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Narrator: The place: New York City. The time: Now, 1962. And there's no time or place like it. If you've got a dream, this is the place to make that dream come true. That's why the soaring population of hopeful dreamers has just reached eight million people. Oh! Make that eight million and one.
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Crazy Credits

The movie opens with the big CinemaScope logo 20th Century Fox used fifty years before. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Making of 'The Break-Up' (2006) See more »

Soundtracks

Fly Me to the Moon (In Other Words)
Written by Bart Howard
Performed by Astrud Gilberto
Courtesy of The Verve Music Group
Under license from Universal Music Enterprises
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User Reviews

60s Retro in Comedy Spoof...
1 October 2003 | by (Las Vegas, Nevada) – See all my reviews

DOWN WITH LOVE, director Peyton Reed's homage/spoof of the Doris Day/Rock Hudson sex comedies of the early 60s, is a delightful bit of fluff in a movie season filled with inferior sequels and overwrought epics. Dazzling to watch, with Givenchy-inspired costumes (if Daniel Orlandi does not receive an Oscar for his work, his peers should turn in their Designer cards), wonderfully over-the-top sets (EVERYBODY in those 60s films lived in apartments you could land airplanes in), and a 'More 1963 New York than 1963 New York' look (created on the studio back lot, with ample support from CGI), the film would deserve a viewing even if the cast never uttered a line of dialog!

Fortunately, the script, by Eve Ahlert and Dennis Drake, is wickedly funny, full of the politically incorrect double entendres that were as close as Hollywood could get to actual 'naughtiness', 30 years ago (and, yes, there are more than a few present that WOULD have been censored, even then). The story, of a woman who writes a best-selling 'self-help' book eschewing the necessity of men for any more than 'casual sex', and the 'Hugh Hefner'-like writer who turns his prodigious charms to work, in the guise of a naive astronaut, to win her love, and thus discredit her theories, would have fit Doris Day and Rock Hudson to a 'T'. While Renée Zellweger and Ewan McGregor lack their role models' charisma, they have a pleasant chemistry together, and the 'split-screen' phone call scenes between the pair are even racier than the Day/Hudson 60s versions.

If the leads seem a bit bland, the supporting cast more than makes up for any shortcomings. In a role that SHOULD garner a 'Supporting Actor' Oscar nomination, David Hyde Pierce takes on the part assumed by Tony Randall or Gig Young in those 60s farces, that of the put-upon, neurotic, sometimes prissy friend of the hero. He is superb, even SOUNDING like Tony Randall, and steals every scene he's in. His 'opposite number', friend of the heroine Sarah Paulson, while not quite at Pierce's level, is still quite funny as a chain-smoking career woman who would chuck it all for the right man. And, in a FABULOUS piece of casting, the MAN himself, Tony Randall, appears as the book publisher whose bestseller is RUINING his love life. At 83, the man can still toss off a funny line...

With a very inventive 'twist-within-a-twist' climax, and Marc Shaiman's evocative score punctuating the proceedings, DOWN WITH LOVE is a delight!


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