IMDb > Lost in La Mancha (2002)
Lost in La Mancha
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Lost in La Mancha (2002) More at IMDbPro »

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Lost in La Mancha -- Fulton and Pepe's 2000 documentary captures Terry Gilliam's attempt to get The Man Who Killed Don Quixote off the ground. Back injuries, freakish storms, and more zoom in to sabotage the project (which has never been resurrected).

Overview

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7.4/10   8,808 votes »
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Release Date:
2 August 2002 (UK) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
They've got a story...but have lost the plot.
Plot:
Terry Gilliam's doomed attempt to get his film, The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, off the ground. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
2 wins & 11 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
tales from the film-making file...one of the most enlightening documentaries I've seen in years See more (64 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)
Tony Grisoni ... Himself - Co-Writer

Philip A. Patterson ... Himself - First Assistant Director (as Phil Patterson)
René Cleitman ... Himself - Producer

Terry Gilliam ... Himself - Writer & Director
Nicola Pecorini ... Himself - Director of Photography

José Luis Escolar ... Himself - Line Producer
Bárbara Pérez-Solero ... Herself - Ass't. Set Decorator
Benjamín Fernández ... Himself - Production Designer (as Benjamin Fernandez)
Andrea Calderwood ... Herself - Former Head of Production, Pathé
Ray Cooper ... Himself - Longtime Gilliam Colleague
Gabriella Pescucci ... Herself - Costume Designer

Carlo Poggioli ... Himself - Co-Costume Designer
Bernard Bouix ... Himself - Executive Producer
Fred Millstein ... Himself - Completion Guarantor

Jeff Bridges ... Narrator (voice)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Orson Welles ... Himself (archive footage)
Bernard Chaumeil ... Himself (uncredited)

Johnny Depp ... Himself (uncredited)

Christopher Eccleston ... Himself (uncredited)
Joan Font ... Himself (uncredited)
Pierre Gamet ... Himself (uncredited)

Vanessa Paradis ... Herself (uncredited)

Bill Paterson ... Himself (uncredited)
Francisco Reiguera ... Don Quixote (archive footage) (uncredited)

Miranda Richardson ... Herself (uncredited)

Jean Rochefort ... Himself (uncredited)

Directed by
Keith Fulton 
Louis Pepe 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Keith Fulton  uncredited
Louis Pepe  uncredited

Produced by
Rosa Bosch .... associate producer: Vice Versa
Andrew J. Curtis .... associate producer (as Andrew Curtis)
Lucy Darwin .... producer
 
Original Music by
Miriam Cutler 
 
Film Editing by
Jacob Bricca 
 
Production Design by
Benjamín Fernández (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jaime Sicilia .... assistant director: Spain (as Jaime Sicilia Nistal)
 
Art Department
Gustave Doré .... etchings: "The Story of Don Quixote"
Benjamín Fernández .... artwork: production design (as Benjamin Fernandez)
Terry Gilliam .... storyboard illustrator
Gabriella Pescucci .... artwork: costume design
 
Sound Department
Michael Kowalski .... sound editor: The Fourth Factory
Michael Kowalski .... sound mixer: The Fourth Factory
 
Stunts
Gonzalo Hernández .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Louis Pepe .... camera operator
François Duhamel .... still photographer (uncredited)
Fernando Vázquez Gondar .... electrician (uncredited)
 
Animation Department
Stefan Avalos .... animator: The Story of 'Don Quixote'
Chaim Bianco .... animator: "Terry Gilliam's Picture Show" and Terry Gilliam's storyboard illustrations
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Massimo Cantini Parrini .... assistant costume designer (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Renee Edwards .... editorial consultant
Keith Fulton .... additional editor
Derek Herr .... on-line editor
Lisa Leeman .... editorial consultant
Randy Magalski .... on-line editor
Louis Pepe .... additional editor
Zac Stanford .... colorist
 
Other crew
Richard Brenin .... transcriptions
Martin Briseño .... production assistant: Los Angeles
Marsha Brown .... production coordinator: London
Sam Buckland .... production assistant: London
Audrey Capotosta .... production assistant: Los Angeles
David DeBlas .... production assistant: Spain
Bill Eckroat .... production assistant: Los Angeles
Harold Manning .... translator: French
Richard Mills .... production facilities: Molinare Studio, London
Marc Munden .... additional production staff: London
Sachi Oda .... travel services: Silverlake Travel
Alexa Portillo .... production coordinator: Spain (as Alexa Portillo Capelli)
Snarby Richard .... archival researcher
Lisa Marie Russo .... additional production staff: London (as Lisa-Marie Russo)
Karl Watkins .... additional production staff: London
Patricia Nieto .... production coordinator (uncredited)
Alberto Poveda .... production assistant (uncredited)
 
Thanks
Warren Bass .... thanks
Jean-Pierre Bedoyan .... thanks
Bernard Bouix .... special thanks
Peter Boyle .... thanks
Betty Burkhart .... thanks
Matthew Buzzell .... thanks
Jenne Casarotto .... thanks
Nicolas Chartier .... thanks
Helen Chough .... thanks (as Helen Chouh)
René Cleitman .... special thanks
Manuel Salas Coll .... thanks
Marianne Connor .... thanks
Amanda Crane .... thanks
Gerald Curtis .... special thanks (as Gerald)
Jacqueline Curtis .... special thanks
Warren Curtis .... thanks
Andrew Darwin .... special thanks
Frances Darwin .... thanks
Oscar Darwin .... thanks (as Oscar)
Nick Davis .... thanks: Memery Crystal
Johnny Depp .... special thanks
Delphine DeWitte .... thanks
José Luis Escolar .... special thanks
Sean Farnel .... thanks
Dominique Fouassier .... acknowledgment: additional storm footage courtesy of
Jeff Fox .... thanks
Beverly Fulton .... thanks
Robert Fulton .... thanks (as Robert)
Valerie Fulton .... thanks
Dean Galanis .... thanks
Elizabeth Gaskell .... thanks (as Mrs Gaskell)
Sonya Geis .... thanks
Victor Gill .... thanks: Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport
Terry Gilliam .... special thanks
Tony Grisoni .... special thanks
Guzmán .... thanks
David Hansel .... thanks: Memery Crystal
Ian Kelly .... special thanks
Susan Kelly .... thanks
Veronica Killseek .... thanks
David Klagsbrun .... thanks
Oja Kodar .... acknowledgment: "Don Quijote de Orson Welles" courtesy of, El Silencio Producciones
Valerie Koscelnik .... thanks
Irene Lamb .... thanks
Bob Lane .... thanks
Francisco Lujan .... thanks
Ray Magill .... thanks
Nick Manzi .... thanks
Patrick McGuinn .... thanks
Sean McPharlin .... thanks
Kevin McTurk .... thanks
Corinne Michel .... thanks
Lisa Molomot .... thanks
Michael Mulcahy .... thanks
Philip A. Patterson .... special thanks (as Phil Patterson)
Nicola Pecorini .... special thanks
Joseph C. Pepe .... thanks (as Joseph Pepe)
Mary Lou Pepe .... thanks
Peter Pepe .... thanks (as Peter)
Berenice Reynaud .... thanks
Jean Rochefort .... special thanks
Sebastian Rotstein .... thanks (as Sebastien Rottstein)
Julia Short .... thanks
Helga Stephenson .... thanks
George Stoll .... thanks
Ted Sullivan .... thanks
Ann Tegnell .... thanks
Agnes Van .... thanks
Ella Von Schreitter .... special thanks
Maggie Weston .... thanks (as Maggie Gilliam)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated R for language
Runtime:
93 min | Canada:89 min (Toronto International Film Festival) | USA:89 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.33 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:M | Canada:A (Ontario) | Czech Republic:12 | Switzerland:7 (canton of Geneva) | Switzerland:7 (canton of Vaud) | Switzerland:10 (canton of Zurich) | UK:15 | USA:R

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Fulton and Pepe embarked on their second feature about director Terry Gilliam intending to make a television documentary about the development and pre-production of Gilliam's long-awaited passion project. Having intimate knowledge of Gilliam's chaotic working methods, they knew they were in for something dramatic. But they had no idea that the story would develop into its own quixotic tragedy. After the failure of Gilliam's production, Fulton and Pepe were wary of finishing their film. Gilliam assured them that "someone has to get a film out of this. I guess it's going to be you."See more »
Quotes:
[Upon watching a screen test of the giants]
Terry Gilliam:That's our trailer, right there!
See more »
Movie Connections:

FAQ

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32 out of 33 people found the following review useful.
tales from the film-making file...one of the most enlightening documentaries I've seen in years, 27 March 2005
Author: MisterWhiplash from United States

Lost in La Mancha was not the sour, totally unfortunate documentary I expected. I knew before I saw the film about a year and a half ago that Terry Gilliam (maverick writer/director/animator/actor from the Monty Python clan) attempted an ambitious film from Don Quixote and it became one of the most notorious stories of a production under a black cloud of bad luck. But what I didn't expect was that the film would really be just an exemplary, honest account of what it takes to make a film. Make no mistake about it, film-making is just difficult work a lot of the time, and a completely collaborative effort where everything has to look right, sound right, be pre-planned to death, and of course the production team (when not in a studio, and out in the wilderness) is at the mercy of nature. Take a look at Orson Welles' career if one should doubt that (a director who, by the way, also attempted his own personal, avant-garde take on Don Quixote, and couldn't finish the film after working on it over the course of almost thirty years).

That The Man Who Killed Don Quixote was (err, is, so to speak) a Gilliam film, the artistic desires are bold and visionary, and a challenge in and of itself. There is the constant factor of money and financing the production that comes into play. All of these factors are explored in this film, and it's actually bitter-sweet, going back and forth until the last twenty minutes or so of the film. One can say that this is one of the most important films about film ever made, the kind of documentary that should be seen by all film students (whether or not you like Gilliam's other films or Johnny Depp or whoever) to see what the film-making process entails once a script is finished.

As the audience, we're taken through the pre-production first, as one learns about what Gilliam and his co-writer Tony Grisoni changed around with the classic Cervantes story. This time, a commercial director, played by Depp, gets sent back in time or to some sort of odd time where Don Quixote, played by Jean Rochefort, mistakes Depp for Sancho Panza, his dwarfish sidekick, then the rest of the film mostly features their adventures through parts of the book's wild stories of Quixote's imagination. Then one learns at what lengths he had to go through to get the film made, on his third try in ten years (no money in America sent him to Europe, where his budget of 32 million was tremendous for European standards). While casting and set/prop/costume designs go fine, one is informed about Gilliam's past ventures in film-making in a brilliant little animated scene (of Gilliam's design perhaps), as a director who's films, aside from the supposed shame that was Baron Munchausen, have been risky artistic gambles by mostly Hollywood studios that have made money and critical acclaim.

So there is that one factor of Lost in La Mancha that works very well- Gilliam is shown as a man of wild, but cool demands, with a specific vision and a compatible crew. "He's a responsible infant terrible, if that makes sense," one producer remarks. After the pre-production gets under-way (with one particularly funny scene where a camera test goes on with a group of bulky giants), the production team starts off their first week of filming. This is when, as one might say, the plot thickens. In the first week Gilliam and his crew get all of perhaps less than a minute of usable footage, as a series of catastrophes come down on them: The extras haven't been rehearsed. The location has been, unwittingly, placed close to a air force base where the planes make terrible noise up above. There is what Gilliam calls almost a 'biblical' thunderstorm that halts production as parts of yhe equipment are flooded, and the nearby locales and mountains have been changed of their original, striking color (not to mention, no sun). Then, the biggest blow, with seventy year old Rochefort, as a tragedy slowly becomes evident with his health.

It is a depressing last twenty minutes of film, but it is still fascinating how it becomes clear that the production will not go on. Certain things are sometimes just not as simple as one might figure with making a film. You got to have the money. You have to follow the contracts. An insurance company comes into play. The assistant director Phil Patterson, who has attempted to make damage control throughout the production, decides to quit instead of being fired. And when it seems as if the film will not get made, Gilliam's rights to the script are out of his hands (in that time, which has likely changed in five years).

But what finally becomes the captivating center of the film is Gilliam and (not to make it sound overtly pretentious) the director as a kind of metaphor for the human condition. Is it better to be someone who takes chances and tries to reach for heights that are sometimes un-attainable (like the film within this film's subject, Don Quixote), or be an average, hack of a director that listens more to producers demands than ones own? This in an underlying theme in Lost in La Mancha, and it makes for the kind of story that could have never been written.

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Will Gilliam ever make his Don Quixote? Spielbergo
HAHAHA IM SO SILLY!! k8doyle33
Why do movies like this don't get made jean_k50
An animated Don Quixote? tuco4life
Original Script oprescue999
The Investors max23
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