5.2/10
16,304
72 user 38 critic

Like Mike (2002)

A 14-year-old orphan becomes an NBA superstar after trying on a pair of sneakers with the faded initials "M.J." inside.

Director:

Writers:

(story), (screenplay) | 1 more credit »

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 win & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Calvin (as Lil Bow Wow)
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Ox
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Marlon (as Julius Charles Ritter)
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Sister Theresa
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Roger W. Morrissey ...
Marvin Joad (as Roger Morrissey)
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Henderson (as Timon Kyle)
Stephen Thompson ...
Smith
Alex Krilov ...
Krilov
David Brown ...
Jones
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Storyline

Calvin and his friends, who all live an in orphanage, find old shoes with the faded letters MJ connected to a powerline. One stormy night, they go to get the shoes when Calvin and the shoes are struck by lightning. Calvin now has unbelievable basketball powers and has the chance to play for the NBA. Written by Jerry Smith

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Think like Mike, Achieve like Mike, Be Like Mike. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for brief mild language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

3 July 2002 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Baschetii fermecati  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$12,179,420, 7 July 2002, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$51,432,423

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$62,432,423
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Michael Jordan was in fact back in the NBA at the time of the film's release. He played for the Washington Wizards from 2001-2003. Throughout the film though the Knights are never shown playing the Wizards. See more »

Goofs

When Clavin wins the contest his ticket says seat 2 when he is sitting in seat 1. See more »

Quotes

Dirk Nowitzki: Can you sign this? It's for my niece.
Calvin Cambridge: Sure. What's her name?
Dirk Nowitzki: Uhhh... Dirk.
See more »

Connections

References E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) See more »

Soundtracks

Put Me On
Written by Alicia Keys, Kerry Brothers (as Kerry Brothers Jr.), Ronald Miller (as Ron Miller),
Bertram Charles Reid, Woody Cunningham and Norman Durham
Performed by Mario
Courtesy of J Records, LLC
(Contains interpolations from the compositions of "I'll Do Anything For You" and "Intimate Connection")
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

A good, clean movie that's fun for kids of all ages.
3 July 2002 | by See all my reviews

Like just about every other recent pop star before him, Lil' Bow Wow has landed the starring role in a major motion picture. Unlike the rest of them, he has managed to carry a good, clean family film. There's nothing too offensive here and kids of all ages (at least from the test screening) seemed to eat it up. While it's not terribly original (see "Rookie of the Year"), it's not trying to re-invent kids' movies, it's just trying to entertain in a fun, safe way, which it does.

Bow (Mr. Wow?) has enough boyish charm and enough charisma to show what could be a promising acting career in addition to his duties as a rapper. Morris Chestnut ("The Brothers") does well as an unwilling mentor who becomes a father figure to the orphaned boy. Crispin Glover is pretty creepy as the greedy "caretaker" of the boy, and Robert Forester and Eugune Levy both have humorous bit parts. Funny cameos by famous basketball players with obviously little acting skills give it an authentic feel.

While this probably won't do too well with critics, that's not who it was made for. The target audience is young kids and it will work for them. Parents won't have to worry about anything objective, except a questionable scene where Bow climbs an electrical wire in a rainstorm to recover his shoes. It's entertaining for kids and passable for adults taking their children. If this sounds good to you, you'll probably like it. If not, it wasn't made for you anyway.


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