6.7/10
883
15 user 11 critic

Leo (2002)

R | | Drama | 12 March 2004 (UK)
A recently-released prisoner and a troubled young boy share a pen-pal relationship, both connected by their past.

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Stephen
...
Mary Bloom
...
Ryan Eames
...
Vic
...
...
Caroline
...
Brynne
...
Ben Bloom
Davis Sweatt ...
Leopold - age 11
James Middleton ...
Louis
...
Jack (as Don Baker)
David Burke ...
Thomas Kingsley
Amie Quigley ...
Ruth Livingston
...
Mark
Zac Epstein ...
Kid #1
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Storyline

A recently-released prisoner and a troubled young boy share a pen-pal relationship, both connected by their past.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The boy you were is not the man you are.

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, some sexuality and violent content | See all certifications »
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Details

Official Sites:

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Release Date:

12 March 2004 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Leopold Bloom  »

Filming Locations:

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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Goofs

A letter addressed to Oxford, Mississippi, clearly has the ZIP Code 64933. The ZIP Code for Oxford, Mississippi, is 38655. There is no city with the ZIP shown in the film; ZIP's beginning with "649" would be near Kansas City, Missouri. See more »

Soundtracks

Loss
Written by Waz
Performed by Waz
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User Reviews

Worth the wait.
17 March 2004 | by (U.K.) – See all my reviews

Leo is a film made up of two story strands, one detailing the experiences of a newly released prisoner and another tells the tragic tale of a bored 50's housewife whose life takes a downward spiral. Gradually, these two story strands weave together in a predictable fashion, but the film loses none of it's power despite this rather obvious 'twist'.

Leo had been sitting on the shelf for a couple of years untill it's recent release in the U.K. and in my opinion it's difficult to see why. From the stunning cinematography employed, to the universally excellent performances, it's a small winner all round. Obviously not a commercial film but so much rubbish is dumped into cinemas nowadays there is a lot of room for films like this.

As stated above, the film has two plotlines running together. The way in which the director takes us to one, and then the other is done cleverly and in no way detracts from the flow of the picture. The cinematography is a times breathtaking. In the scene in which the character of Steven is released from prison, the barbed wire fences behind him look almost beautiful in the sunlight's reflection. Combined with quick edits of his character running against a clear blue sky, the sequence is quite exhilirating.

The performances in Leo also deserve praise. Joseph Fiennes as Steven is excellent, watch out for the scene in which he confronts Dennis Hoppers character in the back room of a diner.

Elisabeth Shue is as good as in Leaving Las Vegas, if not better. Her descent into alcoholism from straight laced housewife is acted perfectly, her reaction to some devastating news delivered by two policemen is heartbreakingly delivered.

Even if the final revelation is painfully predictable, (though there is a quite unexpected plot point revealed late on) and some of the supporting characters are drawn in very broad strokes, Leo ultimately delivers. It's well directed, well acted, looks gorgeous and is quietly moving in it's own way. And you'll still be thinking about it as you walk away from the theater.

How many films can you say that about these days?


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