The Human Stain
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8 items from 2008


'Choke' Hold

12 September 2008 1:59 AM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

Clark Gregg has one of those faces; you've seen him in countless TV and film roles, usually looking serious and determined and carrying a gun. He's played enough cops, lawyers, and FBI agents — among them his recurring role as Agent Michael Casper on The West Wing and his appearance as the mysterious operative looking to recruit the title character in Iron Man — to start his own task force. It's a casting trend that amuses the 46-year-old Gregg and his friends. "I did kind of become the go-to guy for authority figures, which is something that everyone who knows me gets a really good laugh out of," he notes. "I guess I have an FBI face, I don't know."At any rate, it's one that is becoming increasingly familiar to audiences, thanks to turns in films like the aforementioned Iron Man and his regular role as the wry ex-husband to Julia Louis-Dreyfus »

- Jenelle Riley

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Meyer to pen George Washington script

4 September 2008 1:00 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Paul Allen's Vulcan Prods. has inked a deal with "Elegy" scribe Nicholas Meyer to pen a screenplay about the life of George Washington.

Allen said his goal with the project is to present a historically accurate account of America's early years and the country's first president.

"Washington was the indispensable man, the physical embodiment of America's revolutionary ideals and identity," Allen said. "As we consider America's role in today's ever-changing world, understanding the man who had a pivotal role during the birth of our nation is essential."

Nick Wechsler ("We Own the Night") is producing along with Vulcan's Richard Hutton and Michael Caldwell.

Allen has long been looking to collaborate with Wechsler on a project for the company and found the perfect opportunity in focusing on Washington. Recruiting Meyer, who has an extensive knowledge of American history and Washington's life, gave them the green light.

"The myths created by Washington's »

- By Leslie Simmons

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Ten Things You Never Knew About Wentworth Miller

2 September 2008 10:00 PM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Wentworth Miller is an overnight success ten years in the making. The Ivy League scholar paid his dues with bit parts including a student-turned-sea monster in Buffy The Vampire Slayer before landing his big break playing the young Anthony Hopkins in The Human Stain. However, it was his role as brooding jailbird Michael Scofield in Prison Break that catapulted him firmly on to the TV A-list. As the Us drama returns for a fourth season on Sky1 this week, we serve up a few tantalising titbits about the man behind the tattoos. 1. Wentworth was born in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, but his family moved to Brooklyn when he was just one year old. 2. Wentworth's ancestry is complicated enough to put even Johnny Depp to shame - his mum is Russian, French, Syrian, Lebanese and Dutch, while his dad is African-American, Jamaican, English, German and Cherokee. 3. Speaking (more) »

- By Beth Hilton

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Movie Review: Elegy

21 August 2008 9:01 PM, PDT | CinemaNerdz | See recent CinemaNerdz news »

Aug 22, 2008  

There’s much irony in the fact that it took a female director to finally successfully bring the sometimes misogynistic Philip Roth to the big screen. Based on a short story by the masterful writer called The Dying Animal, Isabel Coixet's Elegy is one of the more interesting dramas of the year, and it has not been easy to heap praise on previous Roth adaptations like The Human Stain or Portnoy's Complaint. With other modern masters of the written word ...Read more at MovieRetriever.com »

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Red Band Trailer - Ben Kingsley and Penelope Cruz Heat Up 'Elegy'

20 August 2008 2:29 PM, PDT | GetTheBigPicture.net | See recent Get The Big Picture news »

In general, I don't think Philip Roth novels transfer very well to the screen. Certainly, anyone who sat through Portnoy's Complaint had complaints of his or her own, and most recently, The Human Stain was spun from a Roth book, and that didn't end very well, either.

And while it's a risky proposition to put too much weight into a trailer, Elegy looks like an entirely different situation. It's based on the novel The Dying Animal, and even though Ben Kingsley has kind of been all over the road in the past few years (he's popped up in everything from Sexy Beast and The Wackness to Suspect Zero and The Love Guru), it appears that he's giving the kind of thoughtful, intelligent, weathered performances he can be so good at.

Penelope Cruz also looks up to snuff here, and she's usually not very good when she has to speak English. »

- Colin Boyd

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Amphibian Man To Woo Audiences Thanks to Stone Village

12 August 2008 1:41 PM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

Who knew that one of the "most popular Russian [film] properties in history" is a based on a 1928 novel called "The Amphibian?" I sure didn't. Despite the big-screen, history-making adaptation called Amphibian Man back in 1962, the material is making waves today with an announcement that production company Stone Village (Turistas, The Human Stain) has acquired the film and publishing rights to the story. Part of the plot deals with an "American surgeon living in the Amazon who gives his son shark gills to survive a fatal respiratory disease." This alone sounds like a pretty kickin' sci-fi story. However, the other half of Amphibian Man isn't so intriguing to me - "the young man's underwater life is complicated when he saves a local fisherman's daughter from a shark attack and romantic feelings surface between them." Sadly, the production company's head, Scott Steindorff, says that the "sci-fi elements will remain as »

- Kevin Powers

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Sexual and Intellectual Stimulation: Elegy Trailer

11 June 2008 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- I believe there are a sum total of two possible scenarios where an older gent has any hopes of seducing a much younger female party. One being, the very well accepted notion of the "sugar daddy" status (financially well off to make a younger woman forget about virility and then there is the least likely of the two: charisma - derived from intellectual stimulation. The Berlin film festival presented Isabel Coixet (The Secret Life of Words, My Life Without Me) picture (based on Philip Roth's least acclaimed more recent novels entitled "The Dying Animal,") pits fellow Spaniard Pénelope Cruz against a Ben Kingsley in such a model. Samuel Goldwyn Films were able to swoop up the rights to Elegy a good two months after its world premiere - and if this film can benefit from The Weinstein Company's marketing for Vicky Cristina Barcelona, then we'll have a great »

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Rudin launches preemptive strike with Roth’s 'Indignation'

17 April 2008 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Scott Rudin is on a shopping spree of Texas buffet proportions. Calling first dibs on a film adaptation of Philip Roth’s newest work Indignation, it doesn’t look like Rudin is going to stop diluting, err, “interpreting” literature anytime soon. Roth, author of American Pastoral and Portnoy’s Complaint, is in familiar territory. His novel The Human Stain was a feature release in 2003. But, it took Rudin to say "I've been a maniacal fan of Roth's for years and waited for the one [novel] I thought could really be a great movie.” So, the adaptations of Goodbye Columbus and The Dying Animal mean nothing to you, Rubin? Roth’s Indignation is published by Houghton Mifflin and will be released in September of 2008. Like some of his other works, Indignation is a period novel, set in 1951. Roth is a Jersey boy, and Indignation finds 18-year-old Marcus Messner, son of a Kosher butcher in Newark, »

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8 items from 2008


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