6.9/10
125
2 user 3 critic

Aruku, hito (2001)

Scene: Mashike, a city on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. Nobuo Honma is a 63-year-old sake producer. He has lived with Yasuo since his wife died two years ago. Yasuo is his youngest son ... See full summary »

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2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Ken Ogata ...
Nobuo Honma
Yasufumi Hayashi ...
Yasuo
...
Ryoichi
Sayoko Ishii ...
Michiko (salmon girl)
Nene Ohtsuka ...
Nobuko Shimizu
Fusako Urabe ...
Keiko Noguchi
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Storyline

Scene: Mashike, a city on the Japanese island of Hokkaido. Nobuo Honma is a 63-year-old sake producer. He has lived with Yasuo since his wife died two years ago. Yasuo is his youngest son to whom he has entrusted his trade. Every day Nobuo goes for a walk which leads him to a fish-breeding center, located in the mountains. He fills his loneliness by attentively observing the development of thousands of little fish poured into the pool. The second anniversary of his wife's death approaches. Nobuo insists on the presence of Ryoichi, his elder son whom he hasn't seen for a long time. Nobuo and his two sons, along with their partners, gather for the commemoration. Unspoken feelings resurface and clash with each other. Written by Anonymous

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Genres:

Drama | Comedy

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Release Date:

7 September 2002 (Japan)  »

Also Known As:

A Neve Que Cai  »

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User Reviews

 
Japanese social drama
3 October 2017 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

An interesting movie at times, but some endless scenes of walking through snow to the same place makes one glad to have the fast forward control.

Although forced at times the movie held interest during intense and uncomfortable interactions, as well as more romantic ones. It feels like an insight into a culture that often seems opaque. Here we get a glimpse of hidden feelings as well as that opacity that can create the disconnect and dissatisfaction in a society. Here we have the expression of feeling, without filter.

Does it result in change for the main characters? Perhaps. At least, the veil is withdrawn and clarity is established. Characters now seem to have chosen their path, rather than blindly moving within it, whether by rejection or conformity.


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