6.6/10
163
5 user 8 critic

Yellowknife (2002)

The film tells the story of three couples on the road between the Atlantic coast and the Northwest Territories in Canada.

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2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Sébastien Huberdeau ...
Max
Hélène Florent ...
Linda
Patsy Gallant ...
Marlène Bédard
Philippe Clément ...
Johnny
...
Bill
Todd Mann ...
Billy
...
George
Claude Lemieux ...
Raymond
Melvin Swan ...
Police Officer - Native Reserve
Thérèse Bartel ...
Waitress
Gisèle Caissie ...
Cashier
Marie-Thérèse François ...
Woman in motel hallway
Tonia Levy ...
Chambermaid #1
Jean Clément ...
Chambermaid #2 (as Jean Clement)
Eric Hopper ...
Doorman - Club Mystique
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Storyline

The film tells the story of three couples on the road between the Atlantic coast and the Northwest Territories in Canada.

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Genres:

Drama

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Details

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Release Date:

22 February 2002 (Canada)  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

CAD 3,200,000 (estimated)
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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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User Reviews

 
Bad story, cardboard characters: how does a film like this get made?
10 September 2013 | by (Canada) – See all my reviews

Yellowknife is a shockingly bad film. The plot makes little sense, the characters behaviour and choices make no sense and the dramatic resolution comes out of nowhere and also follows no logic.

Billed as a thriller, it does manage to create some moments of suspense when the lead characters face jeopardy but that tension dissipates in nonsensical payoffs that are just too easy. The film seems to strive for some connection to noir tradition but it only captures a vague resemblance to noir successes or David Lynch-like weirdness.

Its unfortunate because the film wastes the talents of Hélène Florent who has some very moving moments when she's allowed to break out of what appear to be the director's preconceived idea of what a depressive character is supposed to be like. Glen Gould also does well in his role. Patsy Gallant is a really nice surprise as a has-been nomadic night club singer. Unfortunately, the lead Sébastien Huberdeau is sacrificed on the alter of directorial concept and never really cuts loose.

The film does manage to achieve a spooky sense of mood with some good cinematography, interesting locations and a decent but not stellar sound track by Robert Lepage. Unfortunately mood carries Yellowknife only so far because the story breaks down almost from the beginning and the characters are cardboard cutouts and walking clichés.


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