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The Tree of Life: On Darren Aronofsky’s "The Fountain", A Decade Later

  • MUBI
Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain (2006) is showing on Mubi from November 12 - December 12, 1017 in the United Kingdom.“Finish it.”The exhortation is an integral part of the texture of The Fountain as a work of art, but it also refers, obliquely, maybe unconsciously, to all the toil and trouble that surrounded its six-year path to the big screen and its controversial reception. Darren Aronofsky—a headstrong filmmaker if there ever was one—could have simply shelved the project indefinitely after his original lead, Brad Pitt, bailed out prior to the start of the production. But, like the words that Izzi says to Tom and that echo throughout the film’s three interconnected timelines, he didn’t. He had to “finish it.” So Aronofsky did, regrouping, downsizing, rethinking a film that was inspired by both the out-there genre twisting of The Matrix and his own experiences with death. What emerged was
See full article at MUBI »

George Clooney George Clooney Recipient Of 46th AFI Life Achievement Award

The American Film Institute (AFI) Board of Trustees announced today that actor, director, writer and producer George Clooney will be the recipient of the 46th AFI Life Achievement Award, the highest honor for a career in film. The award will be presented to Clooney at a Gala Tribute on June 7, 2018, in Los Angeles, CA. The AFI Life Achievement Award Tribute special will return for its sixth year with Turner Broadcasting to air on TNT, followed by encore presentations on sister network Turner Classic Movies (TCM). Audi and Vizio return as Official Sponsors of the event.

George Clooney is America’s leading man,” said Sir Howard Stringer, Chairman of the AFI Board of Trustees. “Director, producer, writer and actor — a modern-day screen icon who combines the glamour of a time gone by with a ferocious passion for ensuring art’s impact echoes beyond the screen. AFI is proud to present him
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Some love mother! Some don't.

by Murtada

The studio behind mother! has pivoted their second week marketing towards the bad word of mouth that the film has been receiving from moviegoers. They stopped selling it as a home invasion horror thriller and instead decided to embrace how polarizing it is.

Some people love it......some people don’t

It’s a bold move and we like it. What they don’t do though, is mention the F cinemascore that the film recieved. CinemaScore is a company that exit polls moviegoers’ opinions on opening night. They have been storing data since 1986, and in that time only 11 other films received the infamous F. Those so honored include Steven Soderbergh's Solaris (2002) and Andrew Dominik's Killing Them Softly (2012). And make no mistake Darren Aronofsky thinks it's an honor, he told The Frame:

What's interesting about that is, like, how if you walk out of this movie are
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘mother!’: Darren Aronofsky Reacts to ‘F’ CinemaScore, Says ‘Some People Are Not Going to Want to Listen’

  • Indiewire
‘mother!’: Darren Aronofsky Reacts to ‘F’ CinemaScore, Says ‘Some People Are Not Going to Want to Listen’
“mother!” isn’t exactly cleaning up at the multiplex, not that Darren Aronofsky seems terribly let down. His enigmatic thriller scored a rare “F” from CinemaScore, a dubious badge of honor shared with movies both good (Steven Soderbergh’s “Solaris”) and bad (“I Know Who Killed Me”); the writer/director has responded to that failing grade on Kpcc’s the Frame, expressing neither surprise nor disappointment.

Read More:Paramount Defends ‘mother!’ Against Bad Box Office and ‘F’ CinemaScore: ‘This Movie is Brave’

Aronofsky, who most recently directed “Noah” and “Black Swan,” calls his movie a reflection of the way currently things are in the world — so of course it isn’t winning audiences over en masse. Here are his full comments:

“What’s interesting about that is, like, how if you walk out of this movie are you not going to give it an ‘F?’ It’s a punch. It’s a total punch.
See full article at Indiewire »

Darren Aronofsky Reacts To ‘F’ CinemaScore For ‘mother!’

History will ultimately determine the merits of Darren Aronofsky‘s divisive “mother!,” but among the many things it will be remembered for, is being one of only 19 movies in history receive an F-grade CinemaScore. Determined by exit polls of moviegoers’ opinions of films on opening night, the movies that have been deemed as failures include terrific pictures like William Friedkin‘s “Bug” and Andrew Dominik‘s “Killing Them Softly,” and interesting efforts like Steven Soderbergh‘s “Solaris.” But yes, there is also trash on there too like the Lindsay Lohan flick “I Know Who Killed Me” and the parody flick “Disaster Movie.” However, Aronofsky believes there’s no way his “mother!” could’ve received any other score.

Continue reading Darren Aronofsky Reacts To ‘F’ CinemaScore For ‘mother!’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Audiences Hate Jennifer Lawrence's New Movie Mother!

  • MovieWeb
Audiences Hate Jennifer Lawrence's New Movie Mother!
Moviegoers are having very negative reactions to Jennifer Lawrence's latest movie, Mother!, according to CinemaScore, which currently has the movie at an F rating. The Darren Aronofsky directed movie has been getting trashed by audiences, but praised by critics, leading to a huge divide between audience and critic with the polarized reviews. Could it be that moviegoers are beginning a backlash against Jennifer Lawrence?

Jennifer Lawrence is an acclaimed, Academy Award winning actress who was once the highest paid actress in the world two years ago. The 27-year old actress can pretty much do whatever she wants, but it's beginning to look like her fans do not want to see her in horror movies. 2012's House at the End of the Street was panned by critics and is seen as a commercial failure when compared to Lawrence's other work, which still earned a lot of money and was in
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘mother!’ Gets an F CinemaScore, Which Could Mean Trouble at the Box Office

  • Indiewire
‘mother!’ Gets an F CinemaScore, Which Could Mean Trouble at the Box Office
mother!” has accomplished a rare feat: the dreaded “F” CinemaScore. Darren Aronofsky’s new thriller starring Jennifer Lawrence and Javier Bardem has earned largely positive reviews from critics, but its failing grade suggests that multiplex audiences might not take to its oddity as well — especially given that the film is in nearly 2,400 theaters.

Based in Las Vegas, CinemaScore surveys audiences every weekend to gauge their reactions to new movies and see what effect that might have on box-office returns; ballots have six questions. Other movies to earn the rare distinction are Steven Soderbergh’s “Solaris” remake, Andrew Dominik’s “Killing Them Softly,” William Friedkin’s “Bug,” and “I Know Who Killed Me” — so not exactly crowd-pleasers.

Still, it might not be so bad.
See full article at Indiewire »

'Hitman's Bodyguard' Tops Weekend with $21M+ Opening as 'Logan Lucky' Falls Short

'Hitman's Bodyguard' Tops Weekend with $21M+ Opening as 'Logan Lucky' Falls Short
Lionsgate and Summit's action-comedy The Hitman's Bodyguard finished ahead of pre-weekend expectations and took the #1 spot at the weekend box office while WB and New Line's Annabelle: Creation scored a second place finish over its sophomore frame. The weekend wasn't too kind, however, to Bleecker's Logan Lucky, which did manage to finish third, but was unable to crack double digits from over 3,000 locations. As for the weekend overall, the top twelve narrowly escaped becoming the worst weekend of 2017 by less than $1 million by combining for $81.5 million. As of right now, this means the month of August is currently pacing 34% behind August last year while the summer season is pacing 12.8% behind last year. With an estimated $21.6 million, Lionsgate's release of The Hitman's Bodyguard finished #1 at the box office. This outperforms Mojo's pre-release forecast and is just a shade below historical averages for a film of this size and genre from Lionsgate.
See full article at Box Office Mojo »

Great Job, Internet!: Let’s debate Steven Soderbergh’s filmography

Steven Soderbergh frequently claims he’s retiring from directing movies, but fortunately these protests never seem to last very long. His current return from the cinematic grave is Logan Lucky, which opens this weekend; our film staff says the movie proves that Soderbergh is as great as ever. He’s had quite an illustrious film career, ever since his debut Sex, Lies & Videotape wowed audiences at Cannes in 1989. His peak (so far) was likely 2001, when he was Oscar-nominated for directing both Traffic and Erin Brockovich (winning for Traffic). There have been various ups and downs along the way, like Magic Mike, Solaris, the Ocean’s trilogy, The Limey, Bubble, The Girlfriend Experience… the list goes on.

On to about 20-some movies, which is why not one but two sites this week (that we know of) took it upon themselves to rank all of Soderbergh’s movies from ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Steven Soderbergh’s Career in Posters, From ‘Sex, Lies, and Videotape’ to ‘Logan Lucky’

Steven Soderbergh’s Career in Posters, From ‘Sex, Lies, and Videotape’ to ‘Logan Lucky’
Whether directing box office hits and experimental works or producing passion projects, Soderbergh has one of Hollywood’s most dynamic careers.

Related stories8 Times Steven Soderbergh Broke the Rules of Filmmaking and Invented New OnesSteven Soderbergh Movies Ranked from Worst to BestWhy Steven Soderbergh's 'Solaris' Sets the Standard for Movie Remakes
See full article at Indiewire »

Why “Solaris” Sets the Standard for Movie Remakes

With immense style and audacity, Steven Soderbergh has done well to create a remake of the original Solaris Movie. Set in Russia cinema landmarks, he has mentioned that this should not be seen as a copy of Andrei Tarkovsky 1972 version of the movie, but a new version of the 1961 bestselling novel by Stanislaw Lem. In fact, every frame does well to show that this movie has somewhat drawn insights from Tarkovsky, and some inspiration the initial film by Tarkovsky which was known as Kubrick 2001. In this movie, George Clooney takes on the character of Chris Kelvin, who

Why “Solaris” Sets the Standard for Movie Remakes
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Steven Soderbergh: Where to Stream His Greatest Films, from ‘Magic Mike’ to ‘Ocean’s Twelve’

Steven Soderbergh: Where to Stream His Greatest Films, from ‘Magic Mike’ to ‘Ocean’s Twelve’
With Steven Soderbergh’s 28th feature, “Logan Lucky,” coming out this week, IndieWire has ranked every one of his films from worst-to-best. Now here’s where subscribers to HBO Go, Amazon Prime, Netflix, and FilmStruck can stream some of those titles for free.

Related storiesSteven Soderbergh Movies Ranked from Worst to BestWhy Steven Soderbergh's 'Solaris' Sets the Standard for Movie RemakesSteven Soderbergh Has A Game-Changing Plan to Give Directors the Creative Control They Deserve
See full article at Indiewire »

Steven Soderbergh Movies Ranked from Worst to Best

  • Indiewire
Steven Soderbergh Movies Ranked from Worst to Best
Steven Soderbergh’s directing career started with “Sex, Lies and Videotape,” a massive breakout that not only launched his career — it changed the industry of independent filmmaking in America. While struggling to find his footing after becoming a household name at age 26, Soderbergh never let himself become frozen by his early success or some preconceived notion of what his career would be. Instead, he dogmatically followed any story that piqued his interest, regardless if it was building the slick “Ocean’s Eleven” franchise or an experimental film he shot in his hometown with friends (“Schizopolis”).

He has been careful to build a career that was commercially viable so as to maximize his ability to be constantly creating and experimenting with films that were sometimes aggressively uncommercial. Along the way, he has fought to be as efficient a filmmaker as possible – constantly trying different approaches and new technology to make and
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Suburbicon’: George Clooney Says His New Film Co-Written by the Coen Brothers Isn’t a Comedy: ‘It’s Very, Very Dark’

  • Indiewire
‘Suburbicon’: George Clooney Says His New Film Co-Written by the Coen Brothers Isn’t a Comedy: ‘It’s Very, Very Dark’
If you’ve seen the trailer for “Suburbicon,” you might be assuming that the new film starring Matt Damon and directed by George Clooney is a dark comedy. In an interview with Entertainment Weekly, however, the man responsible for “Monuments Men” says there have been “some misconceptions” about his latest directorial effort — namely the fact that “they keep calling it a ‘comedy’ and you’d be hard-pressed to find a lot of funny in it.”

“It’s a pretty angry and dark film, which is sort of what we wanted to make at the time. Every time I see someone go, ‘Yeah, it’s a black-comedy!’ you go, ‘There’s a couple of laughs, but it wasn’t designed to be ha-ha funny,’” continues Clooney. Set in the ’50s, “Suburbicon” centers around a home invasion perpetrated against Damon,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Machines’ Review: A Bracingly Physical Documentary About the True Cost of Cheap Labor

‘Machines’ Review: A Bracingly Physical Documentary About the True Cost of Cheap Labor
A spare and unflinching documentary about the true cost of cheap textiles, “Machines” doesn’t tell us anything we don’t already know about the inhumane work conditions in countries like India, but it forces us to become palpably familiar with the awful facts of the matter. Applying a hyper-visceral vérité approach to a subject that might sound better suited to an infomercial, Rahul Jain’s debut feature is engineered to demolish the barrier between empathy and action, to narrow the distance between slaves and consumers.

This is a film that targets your heart, but works its way there through your senses rather than your sentiments. It doesn’t simply tell you how brutal it is to work 80-hour weeks while earning $100 a month, it forces you to to squint in the darkness of a windowless factory, to smell the aroma of dried sweat and motor oil, to feel the
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature’ Wants You (And Also Some Squirrels) to Start a Riot and Resist the Government — Review

‘The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature’ Wants You (And Also Some Squirrels) to Start a Riot and Resist the Government — Review
“So much for peaceful protests!,” an animated squirrel announces during the first act of “The Nut Job 2: Nutty By Nature,” before forcefully attacking an intruding bulldozer with his tiny squirrel teeth. It’s likely the year’s most unexpected endorsement of violent disobedience — and one that, at least temporarily, pays off in the context of the animated sequel — but it’s also par for the course for a series that’s already rooted in political discourse, as explained by the machinations of some clever squirrels. Tackling heady issues in the guise of a kids’ movie is nothing new for the burgeoning “Nut Job” franchise, which memorably took on (and took down) the virtues of socialism in the first film, but “The Nut Job 2” goes full throttle on the timely stuff, resulting in a (slightly) more thoughtful and entertaining outing.

The newest entry into the franchise picks up soon
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Annabelle: Creation’ Review: Creepy Doll Prequel Delivers Enough Mixed Thrills To Succeed

‘Annabelle: Creation’ Review: Creepy Doll Prequel Delivers Enough Mixed Thrills To Succeed
Forget The Dark Universe. The best horror franchise currently in play belongs to James Wan, whose “The Conjuring” spin-offs delivers a world filled with nightmarish creatures like The Crooked Man, The Nun, and a doll that could make even Chucky’s blood run cold. Welcome to the frightful terrain of “Annabelle,” now equipped with a whole movie to provide its backstory.

Although 2014’s “Annabelle” did well enough at the box office to warrant a sequel, reviews were less than stellar. But the surprise success of Mike Flanagan’s “Ouija: Origin of Evil” offered a solution that was likely too good to ignore: hire an indie horror director to create a prequel-sequel set in the past. And so, the hideously scary doll of the first installment was reborn, this time with “Lights Out” director David F. Sandberg behind the camera.

Read More:‘Annabelle: Creation’ Trailer: The Evil Doll Gets an Origin
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Steven Soderbergh’s ‘Solaris’ Sets the Standard for Movie Remakes

  • Indiewire
Why Steven Soderbergh’s ‘Solaris’ Sets the Standard for Movie Remakes
“I could tell you what’s happening, but I don’t know if that’d really tell you what’s happening.”

Steven Soderbergh could have done anything he wanted after the hugely successful trifecta of “Erin Brockovich,” “Traffic,” and “Ocean’s Eleven.” What he did was remake Andrei Tarkovsky’s “Solaris,” perhaps the headiest science-fiction film ever made — and one that didn’t necessarily seem suited to his sensibilities. The film has its defenders 15 years later — Barry Jenkins expressed his love for it just last week — but is rarely mentioned in discussions of the versatile filmmaker’s best.

Read More:‘Logan Lucky’ Review: Steven Soderbergh Returns From Retirement with a Silly Heist Movie That Has Real Soul

Maybe that’s because it’s something of an outlier in his already varied filmography. Soderbergh has dabbled in genre pictures as often as any other filmmaker not specifically thought of as a genre director,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘In this Corner of the World’ Review: A Quietly Powerful Anime About Living with the Threat of Nuclear War

‘In this Corner of the World’ Review: A Quietly Powerful Anime About Living with the Threat of Nuclear War
Every year, on the evening of August 6th, the people of Hiroshima gather along the banks of the Ota River and light more than 10,000 paper lanterns as the final part of a deeply moving peace ceremony. The memorial event caps off a day of reflection that includes film screenings, musical performances, and a wide variety of different speeches. Hibakusha — survivors of the nuclear blasts — gather around the Atomic Bomb Dome, many of them joined by their children and grandchildren. One particularly animated man performs a parable about the horrors visited upon his hometown, while a British ex-pat translates his story into English for the foreigners in attendance. The atmosphere is solemn, but not somber. There’s good food. Even the tourists start to loosen up.

However, perhaps the most striking thing about how Hiroshima chooses to commemorate its defining tragedy is the way in which the city focuses on the
See full article at Indiewire »

Isabelle Huppert Is a Monster After Dark In Serge Bozon’s ‘Mrs. Hyde’ — Review

Isabelle Huppert Is a Monster After Dark In Serge Bozon’s ‘Mrs. Hyde’ — Review
Isabelle Huppert excels at playing tough, individualistic women, but she can just as easily dial it down for more fragile performances, so it was only a matter of time before she landed a role that let her have it both ways. In Serge Bozon’s peculiar comedy “Mrs. Hyde,” she’s a beleaguered French schoolteacher who gets struck by lightning and taps into the much more powerful, vindictive side of her personality lurking beneath the surface.

It’s a fascinating role in an uneven but frequently insightful movie riddled with amusing asides and enigmatic developments, partly because Huppert doesn’t undergo a radical transformation. Instead, she subtly finds herself at war with her inner confidence, and it’s often hard to tell which side has the upper hand.

Read More:‘Tomorrow and Thereafter’ Review: A Family Drama That’s Almost Powerful But Even More Disappointing — Locarno 2017

“Mrs. Hyde” has been
See full article at Indiewire »
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