American Splendor
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

11 items from 2016


Cleveland According to Movies and Television

19 July 2016 12:24 PM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Our perception of the Forest City having only seen it on screen.

All this week, Cleveland, Ohio, is being overrun with politicians, their supporters, and protestors of their platforms as the Republican National Convention is being held at the Quicken Loans Arena through Thursday. To help get a better sense of this “Cleve-Land,” as Howard the Duck calls it, we’re looking to entertainment, specifically movies and television, for what it can tell us about this city. If there’s anything we miss or misunderstand, blame Hollywood.

Cleveland Rocks

It’s the Rock and Roll Capital of the World, home of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, so it’s not surprising that, to an outsider, Cleveland primarily looks like a city where music reigns. You could make a nice concert with all the fictional bands based there, including Cherry Bomb from Howard the Duck, The Barbusters from Light of Day, the »

- Christopher Campbell

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‘The New Yorker Presents’: How Alex Gibney and Kahane Cooperman Curated the Amazon Series

22 June 2016 8:48 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Produced by Condé Nast Entertainment and Jigsaw Productions, “The New Yorker Presents,” which Amazon revealed in weekly installments starting in February, is unlike anything else. Each of the 10 half-hour episodes is a uniquely curated set of documentary and fiction shorts, comedy, poetry, animation, and cartoons drawn from the rich content of The New Yorker. Both unexpected and hugely entertaining, the series is up for Emmy consideration in the informational program category.

Look at the range of the first two shows. They include Steve James (“Hoop Dreams”) on bull riding, Edwidge Danticat on the connection between Jacob Lawrence’s “Migration Series” and outbreaks of racist violence in America, Nick Paumgarten on closing the $2.4 billion Revel casino, cartoons by Roz Chast, Benjamin Schwartz, and Liana Finck, a look at The New Yorker’s archive library and fact-checking department, a beekeeper and a man who raises pigeons who work atop tall buildings, and »

- Anne Thompson

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‘The New Yorker Presents’: How Alex Gibney and Kahane Cooperman Curated the Amazon Series

22 June 2016 8:48 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Produced by Condé Nast Entertainment and Jigsaw Productions, “The New Yorker Presents,” which Amazon revealed in weekly installments starting in February, is unlike anything else. Each of the 10 half-hour episodes is a uniquely curated set of documentary and fiction shorts, comedy, poetry, animation, and cartoons drawn from the rich content of The New Yorker. Both unexpected and hugely entertaining, the series is up for Emmy consideration in the informational program category.

Look at the range of the first two shows. They include Steve James (“Hoop Dreams”) on bull riding, Edwidge Danticat on the connection between Jacob Lawrence’s “Migration Series” and outbreaks of racist violence in America, Nick Paumgarten on closing the $2.4 billion Revel casino, cartoons by Roz Chast, Benjamin Schwartz, and Liana Finck, a look at The New Yorker’s archive library and fact-checking department, a beekeeper and a man who raises pigeons who work atop tall buildings, and »

- Anne Thompson

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Why superhero fatigue isn't necessarily the problem

8 June 2016 7:55 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Are there too many superhero movies? And are audiences getting bored?

Minor spoilers for X-Men: Apocalypse and Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice lie ahead

At the start of the year, it seemed that the big comic book movie hits were relatively easy to call. Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice, X-Men: Apocalypse and Captain America: Civil War were the safe bets (each, coincidentally, around the 150 minute mark, and major interchanges in their respective franchises/universes/whatever we're calling them). Deadpool would make a profit, given that its budget was modest. Suicide Squad looked more of a gamble, and Doctor Strange arguably moreso.

We're four films into the superhero-infested waters of blockbuster cinema this summer, and already, it feels as though things have changed just a little. Batman V Superman has fallen just short of $900m in worldwide box office takings, a disappointment against what was expected, »

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The 10 Best Comic Book Movie Scenes

30 May 2016 8:05 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Anghus Houvouras with his 10 best comic book movie scenes…

As I watched X-Men: Apocalypse this week, I marveled at a particular thought that was swimming around my cerebellum: Bryan Singer has directed four of the best comic book scenes ever staged. This seems somewhat surprising since the finished films end up being a mish-mash of success and failure. More like ‘the X-Mess’. Am I right? And yet, within some of those X-Men films are sequences that are so perfect you begin to wonder how Singer’s brilliance doesn’t extend to the rest of the movie. Like Paul Maclean in A River Runs Through It, a character who achieves perfection while fly fishing but is never able to find that kind of grace in the rest of his life. It kind of makes Singer’s X-Men films kind of tragic. Flashes of brilliance ultimately smothered in mediocrity. Like an ice »

- Anghus Houvouras

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Writers Guild Pushes for Diversity Tax Credit in New York

9 May 2016 3:34 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The Writers Guild of America East has asked New York Governor Andrew Cuomo to support providing diversity production credits for TV shows.

The legislation would expand the state’s incentive program to include credits for shows that include writers and directors who are women or people of color.

The WGA East delivered nearly 500 letters to the governor Monday — with high profile signers such as Tina Fey and “Spotlight” writer-director Tom McCarthy — in support of proposed legislation that would designate $5 million of the $420 million Empire State Film Production Tax Credit for productions that hire female or minority writers or directors. It would be the first time a film state tax credit has included a diversity clause.

Signers included “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” scribe Michael Arndt; David Simon (“The Wire”); Robert Carlock (“The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”); “Goodfellas” author-screenwriter Nicholas Pileggi; Sarah Treem (“The Affair”), Michael H. Weber (“The Fault in Our Stars »

- Dave McNary

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Jill Soloway to Write, Direct ‘Ten Aker Wood’ For Amazon Studios (Exclusive)

8 March 2016 10:19 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Transparent” creator Jill Soloway will co-write and direct “Ten Aker Wood” for Amazon Studios, Variety has learned.

The film is billed as a coming-of-age story; it centers on a woman in a failing marriage who leaves Los Angeles to live on a pot farm in Northern California. There she falls in love with a biker and embraces an outlaw lifestyle.

Soloway isn’t the only high-profile director in the Amazon stable. The studio is also working on a Barry Levinson (“Rain Man”) film about the Los Angeles comedy scene of the 1960s and ’70s. They’ve set up “Private Life,” a story about a woman in her 40s who goes to extremes to have a child, from Tamara Jenkins of “The Savages” and “Slums of Beverly Hills” fame. And they’re backing “Desired Moments,” a romantic-comedy-fantasy about a lonely TV station employee from director Tom Kuntz and writer Griffin Creech. »

- Brent Lang

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Amazon, Retail Behemoth, Taking Smaller Steps Into Hollywood

8 March 2016 9:00 AM, PST | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

As snow fell steadily, blanketing the mountainside town of Park City, the team from Amazon Studios huddled in a parking lot to discuss the movie that had just premiered at the Sundance Film Festival.

Moments before, the drama “Manchester by the Sea,” a finely calibrated portrait of grief and loss, had received a standing ovation, triggering predictions on social media that the picture would be a major Oscar contender. As the credits rolled, potential buyers rushed to the exits.

Amazon Studios chief Roy Price, who was stuck in the middle of a long row of moviegoers, had to vault over seats to get out of the packed theater.

“We were out afterward in the cold, shivering,” recalls Ted Hope, head of motion picture production at the company. “We were all agreeing on the same thing — that we saw something that doesn’t come around much.”

Cody Pickens for Variety

It »

- Brent Lang

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Amazon, Retail Behemoth, Taking Smaller Steps Into Hollywood

8 March 2016 9:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

As snow fell steadily, blanketing the mountainside town of Park City, the team from Amazon Studios huddled in a parking lot to discuss the movie that had just premiered at the Sundance Film Festival.

Moments before, the drama “Manchester by the Sea,” a finely calibrated portrait of grief and loss, had received a standing ovation, triggering predictions on social media that the picture would be a major Oscar contender. As the credits rolled, potential buyers rushed to the exits.

Amazon Studios chief Roy Price, who was stuck in the middle of a long row of moviegoers, had to vault over seats to get out of the packed theater.

“We were out afterward in the cold, shivering,” recalls Ted Hope, head of motion picture production at the company. “We were all agreeing on the same thing — that we saw something that doesn’t come around much.”

Cody Pickens for Variety

It »

- Brent Lang

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Screenplay Categories: Gender by the Numbers

28 January 2016 3:00 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Manuel here. Much of the conversation following the nominations has deservedly been about the way this year’s nominees function in many ways as a litmus test for the larger pitfalls of the Academy and the industry at large. Take the screenplay categories. As Phyllis Nagy urged us, we should be celebrating the fact that four female screenwriters were nominated for four different films. It sounds like a cause worth celebrating until you realize a total of twenty screenwriters were cited overall. You have to admit, those are appalling (if yes, unsurprising) numbers. Actually, in the past ten years, only 17 out of 156 nominated screenwriters have been women. Three quick stats about this year's categories and how they may show we might be turning a corner.

01 The last time we had two female nominees in the Best Original Screenplay category was in 2011 when Kristen Wiig and Annie Mumolo earned a nomination for their Bridesmaids script. »

- Manuel Betancourt

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The 100 Best Films of the 21st Century (So Far) - Part 1: #100-76

5 January 2016 4:34 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

A new year means an opportunity to reflect on the past. This is our list of the 100 best films of the last 15 years, Part 1 #100 through 76.

The first decade and a half of the 21st century has brought a lot of changes to the landscape of film. The advancement and sophistication of computers has made realistic computer generated effects a mainstay in both big-budget and small-budget films. The internet and streaming technologies have given big Hollywood new competition in films produced independently and by non-traditional means. We went from purchasing films on yards of tape to plastic disks, and now we can simply upload them to the cloud. Advertisements for films have reached a higher, more ruthless level where generating hype through trailers and teasers is crucial for a film’s commercial success. Movie attendance has fluctuated along with the economy, but that hasn’t stopped films from breaking box office records, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

11 items from 2016


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