Ziggy's Gift (1982) - News Poster

(1982 TV Short)

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Reliving the joys of an 80s TV Christmas

Jenny Morrill Dec 20, 2016

Russ Abbot, Bullseye, Noel Edmonds and a film we all watched in the same room. Christmas TV was more exciting in the 80s...

Cast your mind back to when Christmas Day wasn't about Doctor Who followed by sticking something on Netflix until it was time to go watch the annual fist fight outside the pub.

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In the 80s, Christmas was about seeing which fantastic fare the TV had decided to bless us with. Of course, the more prepared among us knew this well in advance, having eagerly pored over the Radio Times/TV Times to check that Jimmy Cricket's Family Laugh 'n' Waz would be shown. There it was – right after Reflections On The Eucharist With The Reverend Paul Leyland.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Richard Williams: the master animator

Richard Williams was a pioneer of hand-drawn animation, working on films such as The Pink Panther and Who Framed Roger Rabbit. But perhaps his most enduring work is his masterclass, The Animator's Survival Kit

When the animator Richard Williams celebrated his 80th birthday last month he was the subject of widespread and heartfelt acclaim as one of the most important and influential figures in his industry. His career has ranged from tiny TV commercials to the biggest budget Hollywood features, including the 1988 homage to the golden age of animation, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, a film widely credited with single-handedly reinvigorating an art form that had fallen badly out of fashion.

Looking back over his many triumphs – as well as some notable disasters – Williams himself ascribes much of his success to a decision he made in the late 1960s, when he effectively demoted himself within his own, highly profitable and multi-award-winning,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Richard Williams: the master animator

Richard Williams was a pioneer of hand-drawn animation, working on films such as The Pink Panther and Who Framed Roger Rabbit. But perhaps his most enduring work is his masterclass, The Animator's Survival Kit

When the animator Richard Williams celebrated his 80th birthday last month he was the subject of widespread and heartfelt acclaim as one of the most important and influential figures in his industry. His career has ranged from tiny TV commercials to the biggest budget Hollywood features, including the 1988 homage to the golden age of animation, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, a film widely credited with single-handedly reinvigorating an art form that had fallen badly out of fashion.

Looking back over his many triumphs – as well as some notable disasters – Williams himself ascribes much of his success to a decision he made in the late 1960s, when he effectively demoted himself within his own, highly profitable and multi-award-winning,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Richard Williams: Cartoon king

Richard Williams was a pioneer of hand-drawn animation, working on films such as The Pink Panther and Who Framed Roger Rabbit. But perhaps his most enduring work is his masterclass, The Animator's Survival Kit

In the late 1960s the animator Richard Williams was established as one of the leading figures in the industry. He had won a Bafta for his debut film, The Little Island; his London based company had developed a lucrative portfolio of commercial television work and he was providing the animated sequences for classic 60s feature films such as the Woody Allen-scripted What's New Pussycat and Tony Richardson's antiwar epic The Charge of the Light Brigade. So, he acknowledges, it was a strange time for him to engineer a demotion for himself.

"In fact I was still the primary director of the work," he explains today "but I also became an assistant to other animators, and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Creator Of Hugely Popular Comic Strip Dies

Cleveland -- Tom Wilson Sr., the creator of the hard-luck comic strip character Ziggy, has died, his family said Monday. He was 80.

Tom Wilson Jr., who took over the comic in 1987, said his father died Friday of pneumonia at a Cincinnati hospital. The elder Wilson had moved from Cleveland to a Cincinnati nursing home about eight years ago to be near his family, his son said.

Wilson was an artist at American Greetings card company in Cleveland for more than 35 years and first published Ziggy in a 1969 cartoon collection, "When You're Not Around."

Ziggy was launched in 15 newspapers in 1971 and now appears in more than 500 daily and Sunday newspapers. It also has appeared in books, calendars and greeting cards.

Tom Wilson Jr. said the name Ziggy derived from his father's school experience of being the last alphabetically. When a new classmate arrived with a last name beginning with "Z," the
See full article at Huffington Post »

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