Mr. Piper (1960– )

TV Series  -   -  Animation | Family
7.8
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Alan Crofoot was the programmes host, introducing four parts in each episode. In the first part (Teletune) he narrated a fantasy story. In the second part (Port of Call) he presented films ... See full summary »

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Title: Mr. Piper (1960– )

Mr. Piper (1960– ) on IMDb 7.8/10

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Episodes

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Unknown   1  
Unknown   1964   1963  
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Cast

Series cast summary:
Alan Crofoot ...
 Mr. Piper (3 episodes, 1963-1964)
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Storyline

Alan Crofoot was the programmes host, introducing four parts in each episode. In the first part (Teletune) he narrated a fantasy story. In the second part (Port of Call) he presented films about children and events in other countries. The third part (Bag of Tricks) featured magic that was performed by Crofoot himself. And in the fourth part (Animal Farm) he told stories, that included characters such as Rupert the cat, Bessie the bunny and Kookie the kitten, all in a miniature farm/barnyard setting. Written by <llink@swipnet.se>

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Genres:

Animation | Family

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Release Date:

1963 (Canada)  »

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(39 episodes)

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Trivia

In the USA it is thought only the short cartoon sequences were shown, while other countries got to see the full half hour show. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Soft Sell Home Schooling
29 July 2014 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

WE DISCOVERED THIS unusual, low key and genteel series quite accidentally. My brothers, Jim & Bob Ryan had paper routes in our Chicago Southside Neighborhood of West Englewood and I, the older brother, would often help them to finish early. Then after a 7:00 or 8:00 AM Mass at St. Theodore Church, the rest of Sunday morning was free.

AS WAS OFTEN the case, there was not anything else to do. So, depending on the Midwest's ever-changing Meteorological conditions (that's Weather, Schultz), That meant that we had early sessions with our living room B & W TV.

BEING THAT Sunday mornings were a low viewer participation period with the local stations, it was an excellent time to unleash and unload a Lion's share of those Public Service Announcements and those community oriented programs of Brotherhood, be it Religious or secular in nature.

ODDLY ENOUGH, AT an hour when most faithful Churchgoers, regardless of faith or denomination, were not even at their chosen place of worship, here we were viewing a most unusual kiddie show. And although we did not realize it at the time, but this was really an "import";eing that it was produced in Toronto, Canada.

SO IT CAME to pass that the Ryan household discovered MR. PIPER. Being that there was nothing much else in the way of competition on, we often watched. If for no other reason that it was a curiosity piece, we were familiar with this series and hadn't thought about it for some time. Until just today, while surfing the web, we stumbled onto a video of it on Youtube.com.

WHAT IT WAS in essence was that sort of show that was aimed at young kids and was intended to subtly and ever so gently instruct their young minds in good judgment, good manners and a consideration for others. This is the same sort of role that people such as Miss Frances (DING DONG SCHOOL), Bob Keeshin (CAPTAIN KANGAROO) and Fred Rogers (MISTER ROGERS' NEIGHBORHOOD) had long advocated.

ONE THING THAT was impossible to ignore was the opening that was sung by Host/Mr.Piper (Alan Crofoot). It was obvious that his was a classically trained, operatic voice.

THIS WAS CLEARLY evident, even to some Southside Irish lads in Chicago.


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