Katakuri-ke no kôfuku (2001) - News Poster

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For the Man Who Has Everything: Takashi Miike’s Bizarre Horror-Comedy ‘The Happiness of the Katakuris’ Is ‘Dawn of the Dead’ Crossed with ‘The Sound of Music’

Some movies are so bizarre – so utterly off-the-wall – that they have to be seen to be believed. It’s not that they’re (necessarily) bad, just that they’re utterly beyond anything else that’s out there, even for the most adventurous movie-goer. This is the case with The Happiness of the Katakuris, a movie seemingly intent on actively resisting any attempt at conventional description. The DVD box art proclaims it to be “The Sound of Music meets Dawn of the Dead,” which is about as accurate a description as anybody could come up with. The film is part slasher, part comedy,

For the Man Who Has Everything: Takashi Miike’s Bizarre Horror-Comedy ‘The Happiness of the Katakuris’ Is ‘Dawn of the Dead’ Crossed with ‘The Sound of Music
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Chen Kaige’s ‘Demon Cat’ Picked Up by Moonstone, Emperor (Exclusive)

Moonstone Entertainment and Hong Kong’s Emperor Motion Pictures will share sales duties on “Legend of the Demon Cat,” the latest film from Palme d’Or winning Chinese director Chen Kaige.

A period action drama, the film sees a Chinese poet and a Japanese monk join forces to investigate the influence of a demonic cat, which has possessed a general’s wife, wreaked havoc on the royal court and killed legendary courtesan Yang Guifei. The film, originally presented under the title “Kukai,” is adapted from a bestselling four-volume novel about love, death and revenge by Yumemakura Baku.

The film is structured as a Japan-China co-production involving China’s New Classics Media and Japan’s Kadokawa. Hong Kong’s Emperor boarded later. The international cast is headed by Sometani Shota and Huang Xuan, as well as Keiko Matsuzaka (“The Happiness of the Katakuris”).

International sales are split. Emperor is handling South Asia,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie Poster of the Week: Now Showing on Mubi

  • MUBI
Above: Soviet poster for The Ghost That Never Returns (Abram Room, Soviet Union, 1929). Designed by the Sternberg Brothers.Have you seen what’s playing on Mubi lately? Many of you who read my column may not often partake of the best of what Mubi has to offer, which is a beautifully curated, constantly changing selection of films which amounts to a top-notch repertory cinema on your laptop and in your living room. Now that Mubi is on the Roku app too there is even more reason to subscribe to the best film streaming deal on the internet. I know, I know, there is always too much to see and too little time, but for me what elevates Mubi over other streaming services—and I’m not just saying this because I write for them—is the 30-day model which offers you a new surprise every morning as well as the
See full article at MUBI »

La La Land review – worth making a song and dance about

Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling lay on the charm in Whiplash director Damien Chazelle’s magical love letter to the golden age of Hollywood

The Australian film-maker Stephan Elliott once jokingly told me that he’d made The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert to bring screen musicals back from the grave into which Xanadu had put them. Yet despite reports of their death, musicals have never gone away, providing the backbone of the movie business in key territories such as India, and regularly flourishing elsewhere across the globe. In 2008, Phyllida Lloyd’s film of the Abba-fest Mamma Mia! became a record-breaking UK hit (paving the way for Sunshine on Leith et al), while stage-to-screen adaptations, from Chicago to Les Misérables, have consistently charmed Oscar voters in America.

Alongside Baz Luhrmann’s Moulin Rouge!, early 21st-century cinema has given us everything from Lars von Trier’s Dancer in the Dark
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

New to Streaming: ‘Cameraperson,’ ‘Aquarius,’ ‘Christine,’ ‘It Follows,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Aquarius (Kleber Mendonça Filho)

The staggeringly accomplished debut feature by Brazilian critic-turned-director Kleber Mendonça Filho, Neighboring Sounds, announced the arrival of a remarkable new talent in international cinema. Clearly recognizable as the work of the same director, Mendonça’s equally assertive follow-up, Aquarius, establishes his authorial voice as well as his place as one of the most eloquent filmic commentators on the contemporary state of Brazilian society. – Giovanni M.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Competition: Win Takashi Miike’s ‘Black Society Trilogy’ on Blu-ray

To celebrate the release of Takashi Miike’s Black Society Trilogy - out on DVD & Blu-Ray from 16th January – we are giving away a Blu-ray copy courtesy of Arrow Video!

After several years spent working almost exclusively in the direct-to-video world of “V-cinema” in Japan, Takashi Miike announced himself as a world-class filmmaking talent with this trio of thematically-connected, character-centric crime stories about violence, the underworld of Japanese society, families both real and surrogate, and the possibly hopeless task of finding one’s place in the world. His first films made specifically for theatrical release, and his first for a major studio, the Black Society Trilogy was the beginning of Miike’s mature career as a filmmaker and they remain among the prolific director’s finest works.

Set in the bustling Kabuki-cho nightlife neighborhood of Tokyo, Shinjuku Triad Society follows a mixed-race cop (Kippei Shiina, Outrage) struggling with private issues
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Giveaway – Win Takashi Miike’s Black Society Trilogy

To celebrate the release of Takashi Miike’s Black Society Trilogy – out of DVD & Blu-Ray from 16th January – we are giving away a blu-ray copy courtesy of Arrow Video!

After several years spent working almost exclusively in the direct-to-video world of “V-cinema” in Japan, Takashi Miike announced himself as a world-class filmmaking talent with this trio of thematically-connected, character-centric crime stories about violence, the underworld of Japanese society, families both real and surrogate, and the possibly hopeless task of finding one’s place in the world. His first films made specifically for theatrical release, and his first for a major studio, the “Black Society Trilogy” was the beginning of Miike’s mature career as a filmmaker and they remain among the prolific director’s finest works.

Set in the bustling Kabuki-cho nightlife neighborhood of Tokyo, Shinjuku Triad Society follows a mixed-race cop (Kippei Shiina, Outrage) struggling with private issues while
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Tokyo: Japanese Actress Keiko Matsuzaka Joins Chen Kaige’s ‘Kukai’

Veteran Japanese actress Keiko Matsuzaka (“The Sting of Death,” “The Happiness of the Katakuris”) has joined the cast of Chen Kaige’s Chinese-Japanese co-production “Kukai.” The film is now in production in China and scheduled for release in 2018.

The period drama is based on a novel by Yumemakura Baku and stars Sometani Shota and Huang Xuan. Production is by China’ New Classics Media and Japan’s Kadokawa Corp. Toho and Kadokawa will jointly handle distribution in Japan.

The news was announced Friday at an event during the Tokyo Film Festival. It was attended by Tsuguhiko Kadokawa, chairman of Kadokawa, Yoshishige Shimatani, president & CEO, of Toho Co., as well as Matsuzaka and the author Yumemakura. Chen sent a video message from China.

First published in 2004, the four-volume novel tells the story of a young Buddhist monk (played by Sometani) who journeys to China during the Tang Dynasty (Ad 618-907) and befriends
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Shudder’s October Titles to Include 1980s Anthology Series Tales From The Darkside

  • DailyDead
Shudder will take viewers to the place that's "not as brightly lit" this Halloween season, as the 1980s anthology series Tales From the Darkside will be available to watch in its entirety on the horror streaming service beginning October 1st:

Press Release: New York, New York – September 26, 2016 – The AMC-backed streaming service, Shudder, is The entertainment destination for everything you need to watch this Halloween season. Whether you’re a hardcore horror fan or simply looking for the scariest films to celebrate this time of year, Shudder has something for everyone in its sweeping library, carefully curated by some of the top horror experts in the world.

As Halloween approaches, Shudder is expanding its database with a variety of new titles including cult favorites, blockbuster hits, and classic thrillers. Additionally, for the first time ever, Shudder will be offering horror TV series to complement its expansive film library.

Premiering October 20th
See full article at DailyDead »

Cinema Gadfly – Episode 24 – The Happiness of the Katakuris

My guest for this month is Christa Mrgan, and she’s joined me to discuss the film she chose for me, the 2001 surreal horror-comedy film The Happiness of the Katakuris. You can follow the show on Twitter @cinemagadfly.

Show notes:

Takashi Miike has made an astonishing 90 films in his career, but none quite like this one Thematically it would be hard to have two films as different as this one and our last episode on Ozu’s An Autumn Afternoon Arcadia, California was home to at least one video store, in 2004 It really is quite hilarious that both An Autumn Afternoon and this were released by Shochiku, how the world changes Shochiku were, of course, also the sometime home to films by Nagisa Oshima, and Mikio Naruse As well as the phenomenally goofy films of their horror period, so brilliantly captures by Criterion in the When Horror Came to Shochiku
See full article at CriterionCast »

NYC Weekend Watch: Fassbinder Favorites, Buñuel, Queer Cinema, King Hu & More

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

You’ve read of Rainer Werner Fassbinder‘s ten favorite films — now you can see them. The German titan’s beloved titles are celebrated in a new series: Johnny Guitar screens this Friday; Saturday offers Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, The Night of the Hunter, and the rarely seen The Red Snowball Tree; on Sunday, one can
See full article at The Film Stage »

Attention Horror Fans! American Horror Project: Vol.1 Belongs on Your Shelf

Arrow Films/Video has been in the home video business for years, but it wasn’t until 2015 that the UK-based label set up shop here in North America. The months since have already seen some must-own releases for genre fans including Brian Yuzna’s terrifically icky Society, Takashi Miike’s delightful The Happiness of the Katakuris, and near-forgotten slashers like Blood Rage and The Mutilator. It’s their love for the near-forgotten that has led to their latest endeavor — the ambitious and important American Horror Project. The goal is to dig deep into American horror films with a focus on titles from the ’70s and ’80s that never quite caught on despite their merit. These are movies that saw limited, if any, theatrical release and met a similar fate on home video. Arrow’s plan is to treat them with the same love and respect they give to their higher-profile titles including the best possible restorations and
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Takashi Miike’s Audition getting Blu-ray steelbook release courtesy of Arrow Video

Arrow Video has announced a special limited edition Blu-ray steelbook release for Takashi Miike’s notorious J-horror classic Audition, which is set for release on February 29th.

See Also: Pre-order Audition Via Amazon

One of the most shocking J-horror films ever made, Audition exploded onto the festival circuit at the turn of the century to a chorus of awards and praise. The film would catapult Miike to the international scene and pave the way for such other genre delights as Ichii the Killer and The Happiness of the Katakuris. The latter which was made available by Arrow Video on Blu-ray and DVD last year.

Recent widower Shigeharu Aoyama is advised by his son to find a new wife, so he seeks the advice of a colleague having been out of the dating scene for many years. They take advantage of their position in a film company by staging an audition to find the perfect woman.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film Review: Yakuza Apocalypse

  • CineVue
★★☆☆☆ Where on Earth do you start with Takashi Miike's latest offering Yakuza Apocalypse (2015)? Perhaps the best place is with two words that will immediately signal to many people whether or this a film that they might enjoy - with emphasis on the word 'might'. Those words are 'Yakuza Vampire' and this symphony of schlocky slapstick will reward those for whom they conjure up palpable anticipation of gangsters meeting the undead in a bout of comically absurd blood-letting. This is Miike back in kinds of waters that he navigated in 2002's The Happiness of the Katakuris and fans of his more chaotic work should be well served. Of course, for one man's chaos read another man's shambles.
See full article at CineVue »

‘Yakuza Apocalypse’ Review

Stars: Yayan Ruhian, Rirî Furankî, Hayato Ichihara, Mio Yûki, Pierre Taki, Denden, Tetsu Watanabe, Yoshiyuki Morishita, Riko Narumi, Reiko Takashima, Lily Frankie, Masanori Mimoto, Shô Aoyagi, Manzô Shinra, Kiyohiko Shibukawa | Written by Yoshitaka Yamaguchi | Directed by Takashi Miike

When considering the work of a director who often makes up to six or seven films a year, you might be forgiven for assuming that most of these would be low-key, simple productions focusing on small sets of characters. Not so in the case of Takashi Miike, the filmmaker behind such eyebrow-raising fare as the ultraviolent Ichi The Killer, zombie musical comedy The Happiness of the Katakuris and contemplative drama The Bird People in China. Never one to shirk an ambitious project for the sake of an easy life, Miike’s latest film sees him on world-ending form with Yakuza Apocalypse.

Kageyama is a low-level Yakuza thug bullied by his fellow gangsters
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

The Happiness of the Katakuris | Blu-ray Review

Takashi Miike‘s The Happiness of the Katakuris begins with a woman probing a freshly delivered bowl of soup only to fish out a miniature angel/gargoyle/teletubby? whose presence seems to instigate the onscreen conversion of the world into claymation before tearing out the poor woman’s uvula and tossing it into the air to float away like a heart-shaped balloon. This is a film that, even in an oeuvre that includes works as disparate as gross out shocker Visitor Q and the kid friendly The Great Yokai War, is pure unpredictable insanity that baffles as much as it entertains. Essentially a horror comedy musical, Miike’s genre mashing farce is loosely based on Kim Jee-woon’s The Quiet Family, in which a family owns a remotely located bed and breakfast whose customers always happen to die during their stay, yet takes that simple premise to its outermost extremes in the silliest of ways.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

‘The Happiness of the Katakuris’ Blu-ray Review

Stars: Kenji Sawada, Keiko Matsuzaka, Shinji Takeda, Naomi Nishida, Kiyoshirô Imawano, Tetsurô Tanba, Naoto Takenaka, Tamaki Miyazaki, Takashi Matsuzaki | Written by Ai Kennedy, Kikumi Yamagishi | Directed by Takashi Miike

Being a Takashi Miike fan takes you down some strange roads. Whether it is the extreme Ichi the Killer and Visitor Q, or the fun Crow Zero movies there is always something a little off about all of his movies. One of the strangest to come from him has to be The Happiness of the Katakuris, a musical about happiness, family and death which is out now from Arrow Video

When the Katakuri family build a bed and breakfast in the country, they do so on the promise of a new road being built close to it to provide them with plenty of customers. When the road doesn’t appear though they start to wonder if they are cursed to fail.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Off The Shelf – Episode 54 – New Releases For The Week Of Tuesday, June 16th 2015

This week on Off The Shelf, Ryan is joined by Brian Saur to take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for the week of June 16th, 2015, and chat about some follow-up and home video news.

Subscribe in iTunes or RSS.

Episode Links & Notes Follow-up Unopened movies Christopher Lee News Thunderbean: Willie Whopper Blu-ray Pre-order Criterion September Line-up Scream Factory to release Army Of Darkness, Demon Knight and Bordello of Blood Arrow Video: Zardoz, The Mutilator, Requiescant, The Firemen’s Ball, Closely Watched Trains, Hard To Be A God, Society Masters Of Cinema / Eureka: The Skull Warner Bros. Hammer Horror Blu-ray Box Set Warner Bros Special Effects Boxset (Them!, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, Son of Kong, Mighty Joe Young) Sony to release The Last Dragon on Blu-ray Scorpion: Burn Witch Burn Kino Cartoon Classics Announced Kl Studio Classics F/X 2 and The Challenge Universal to put out
See full article at CriterionCast »

14 New Movies to Watch at Home This Week

Our pick of the week is Arrow Video's beautiful new Blu-ray of Takashi Miike's The Happiness Of The Katakuris!

"14 New Movies to Watch at Home This Week" was originally published on Film School Rejects for our wonderful readers to enjoy. It is not intended to be reproduced on other websites. If you aren't reading this in your favorite RSS reader or on Film School Rejects, you're being bamboozled. We hope you'll come find us and enjoy the best articles about movies, television and culture right from the source.
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Daily | Cannes 2015 | Takashi Miike’s Yakuza Apocalypse

Takakshi Miike's Yakuza Apocalypse is "primo Miike," declares the Telegraph's Robbie Collin, "switched to Fun Mode: the same setting that produced the family-serial-killer musical The Happiness of the Katakuris (2001) and the masterful post-Lynchian farmyard freak-out Gozu (2003); two inspired, genre-melting films that kept midnight movie crowds roaring until the early hours…. The demented brilliance of Miike’s film lies in the director’s ability to craft ideas that are simultaneously sublime and ridiculous." We've got the trailer and we're gathering more reviews. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »
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