7.0/10
118
6 user 13 critic

Divan (2003)

Not Rated | | Documentary | May 2003 (USA)
Divan is the quest for a turn of the century Hungarian couch upon which Hassidic rabbis slept.

Director:

2 wins. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Herself - Narrator
Amichai Lau Lavie ...
Himself
Basya Schechter ...
Herself
Giti Koenig ...
Herself
Isaac Stein ...
Himself
Jeanette Friedman ...
Herself
Louis Farkowitz ...
Himself
Mark Joseph Altman ...
Himself
Michelle Miller ...
Herself
Pessy Sloan ...
Herself
Bruriah Sloan ...
Herself
Rosalie Osian ...
Herself
Sarah Cecilie Finkelstein ...
Herself
Yermiyahu Ahron Taub ...
Himself
Malke Feldman ...
Herself - My Great Aunt
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Storyline

Divan follows the filmmaker's effort to retrieve a turn-of-the-century family heir loom - a couch. The filmmaker journeys from her birthplace, Brooklyn's Hasidic community, to its origins in Hungary and back. The couch - considered holy because certain Hasidic rabbis had slept on it - survived WWII and is in the filmmaker's great grandfather's house in Rohod, a northeast Hungarian town. In the tradition of storytelling, the filmmaker creates a visual parable about the Hasidic community that she left as a teenager. She trails the couch through a quirky landscape populated by Hasidim in Brooklyn, Holocaust survivors and ex-communists in Hungary, and, finally, the next generation of formerly-Hasidic Jews on the margins of their communities in New York and Israel. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Everyone has a couch. Not everyone has a couch with a story like this.

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

Not Rated
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Details

Country:

| | |

Language:

| |

Release Date:

May 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A divány  »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$3,560, 21 March 2004, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$56,214, 13 June 2004
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

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User Reviews

 
wonderful

Very personal documentary detailing the filmmaker's pursuit of a family heirloom, but also touching on the difficulties of leaving the Hasidic community and her efforts to get her father's approval. This does pretty much everything right. The story is well told and has some surprises, Gluck herself is likable and her expatriate Hasidm friends are articulate and insightful. The people she meets on her journey are charming and funny, and Rebbe's turn out to be more likable than stern in interviews.

I actually used to have a friend who had left the Hasidic community (they held a funeral for him when he left), so it was interesting to see a group of these people, one of whom reminded me of him. He always seemed lost, exploring some Christian groups just for the sense of community and spiritual joy, and after 30 years in the world he married and dragged his expatriate wife back to the Hasidm, pretty much dumping all his friends in the process. Which doesn't have much to do with the movie but does show how difficult it is much will it takes to leave.


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