5.8/10
212
6 user 1 critic

100 Days in the Jungle (2002)

100 Days in the Jungle tells the amazing true story of Canadian oil workers who were kidnapped by Colombian rebels and marched through the Ecuadorian jungle for 100 days.

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3 wins & 21 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
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Rod Dunbar
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Barry Meyer
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Grunt (Grant Rankin)
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Barney (Brant Scheelar)
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Colin Fraser
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Leonard Carter
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Bean (Neil Barber)
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Skunk (Steven Brent)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
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Dave
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Stan Walton
Colin McDonald ...
Reporter
Bismark Méndez ...
Kidnapper
Emily Nash ...
Krissy

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Storyline

When the Noralty oil company ignores warnings about the dangers in the Colombian border area, eight of its employees (Canadians and one US Navajo) working on a pipeline in Ecuador are kidnapped by the well-organized guerrilla group which demands a $20,000,000 ransom, refused by the concern, and forces them deep in the Amazonian jungle where they hide from the army. Forty long days of marching trough this green hell gets the hostages in such bad shape that they must finally be brought into an insurgent camp. The Canadian embassy, skeptic except for one RMCP sergeant, can only negotiate about the price... Written by KGF Vissers

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Drama

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15 December 2002 (Canada)  »

Also Known As:

100 Dias na Floresta  »

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Did You Know?

Trivia

On one of the last nights of filming in Edmonton, the temperature was twenty below zero and the entire cast and crew were freezing, so heating bars were brought out and placed around the set. Between scenes, the cast would gather around them to warm up. However, no one noticed that the blue jumpsuits the leads were wearing might not be heat-resistant. It isn't visible in the final film, but at least one pair of blue jumpsuit pants had melted across the front during filming, exposing white lining. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Boring and one-sided ode to oilmen
15 December 2002 | by (Montreal, Qc, Canada) – See all my reviews

This film is an embarrassment to Canadians. Though it was horrible for the pipeliners to suffer their ordeal in the jungles of Ecuador, this film gives the viewer no opportunity to understand any of the complexities of global corporatization. The female Canadian translator who pointed out how the people of Columbia live in poverty while the US (and Canada) benefit from their oil was quickly shut up early on, and we never hear another word about living, breathing people in that part of the world.

The hostages dream of 2 inch, prime cut steaks while in captivity. What do the people of Central America have to dream about? Bringing a bunch of actors to Costa Rico's forests to cover them in mud and fake wounds is not enough to convey this true story. Hauling in Nicholas Campbell as the FBI agent felt like an attempt to pull in viewers. Campbell's successful tv role as real life Vancouver coroner Dominic DaVinci (not the original's real name) was based on a man who acted on behalf of suffering drug addicts in his city, rather than treating them like criminals. Aligning himself with this one-sided story gives it no more credibility.

100 Days is well filmed and terrifying to watch at times, though predictable and cliched. I never felt like the makers of the film knew what was really going on in the world beyond their privileged lives. 2/10 for defining "real men" in this shallow and partial way. Though Canada spends less on films that the US, this is no excuse for bad film-making. I've seen many excellent films made on shoestring budgets.


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