7.4/10
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The Kid Stays in the Picture (2002)

Documentary about legendary Paramount producer Robert Evans (the film shares the same name as Evans's famous 1994 autobiography).

Writers:

(book), (screen adaptation)

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4 wins & 13 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Narrator
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
Charlie Bluhdorn ...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage) (as Bill Castle)
...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Herself (archive footage)
Charles Evans ...
Himself (archive footage)
Josh Evans ...
Himself (archive footage) (as Joshua Evans)
...
Herself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Herself (archive footage)
Karen Greenberger ...
Herself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
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Storyline

This documentary captures the life story of legendary Hollywood producer and studio chief Robert Evans. The first actor to ever to run a film studio, Robert Evans' film career started in 1956, poolside at the Beverly Hills Hotel. His good looks, charm and overwhelming confidence captured the eye of screen legend Norma Shearer, who offered him a film role. After a glamorous--but short-lived--career as a movie star, Evans tried out producing. At the age of 34, with no producing credits to his name, he landed a job as chief of production at Paramount Pictures. Evans ran the studio from 1966-1974. During his tenure, he was responsible for such revolutionary films as The Godfather, Rosemary's Baby, Love Story, The Odd Couple, Harold and Maude and Chinatown. By the early '80s, the Golden Boy of Hollywood was losing his luster. After a failed marriage to Ali MacGraw, a cocaine bust and rumored involvement with the Cotton Club murder, he disappeared into near-obscurity. Only through ... Written by Sujit R. Varma

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Story Of A Man Who Seduced Hollywood. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and some brief violent and sexual images | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

16 August 2002 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A kölyök képben marad  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$89,087 (USA) (28 July 2002)

Gross:

$1,434,436 (USA) (6 October 2002)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title comes from Darryl F. Zanuck's response to executives wanting to fire Evans from the lead role of The Sun Also Rises (1957). See more »

Goofs

The closing credits say that Evans has been at Paramount for over 35 years, "more than any other producer on the lot." However, A.C. Lyles has been with Paramount for 75 years (as of 2003), though he is no longer actively producing. See more »

Quotes

Robert Evans: Any man who thinks he can read the mind of a woman is a man who knows nothing.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The closing credits include 1976 footage of Dustin Hoffman doing an impersonation of Robert Evans giving the 1996 President-Elect acceptance speech. See more »

Connections

Edited from The Godfather Comes to Sixth St. (1976) See more »

Soundtracks

Lullaby
Written by Krzysztof Komeda (as Christopher Komeda)
Courtesy of Famous Music Corporation and Paramount Pictures
See more »

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User Reviews

 
An excellent telling of a great Hollywood story
22 May 2003 | by (Milwaukee, WI) – See all my reviews

Documentaries are a dime a dozen, and I've seen my share. Being the type of person who would watch a documentary on anything, I was excited to catch this film about a man who has had one hell of a career in Hollywood. I knew I would find the subject matter interesting, but was completely surprised at how much I enjoyed the way the story was presented.

The Kid Stays In The Picture is the story of Robert Evans, told in Evans' words and narrated by Evans himself. His amazing career highs and lows are detailed in fantastic cinematic fashion, utilizing photographs and film clips from Evans' acting, then producing career while accompanied by Evans' enrapturing narration. The stories told by Evans were so effective and interesting that it could have been overlaying a blank screen and would have riveting. He is truthful, arrogant and most importantly, self-deprecating. He isn't afraid to admit the mistakes he made in his career, which is a refreshing turn from so many self-serving documentaries.

If anything, this film is worth watching for two scenes: When Evans tells the story of his near-suicidal moments that are harrowing in itself, but is accompanied by appropriate images from some of the films he produced. The other is during the final credits, when you see Dustin Hoffman do an incredible and hilarious impersonation of Evans on the phone. I certainly hope that Evans was proud of the way this documentary portrayed him, and should be commended in the way he portrayed himself.

--Shelly


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