7.4/10
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10 user 38 critic

Amandla! A Revolution in Four Part Harmony (2002)

Interviews, archival footage, and filmed performances highlight the role of music in the South African struggle against apartheid.

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Cast

Credited cast:
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Himself (voice)
F.W. de Klerk ...
Himself (archive footage)
Abdullah Ibrahim ...
Himself
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Himself (archive footage)
Duma Ka Ndlovu ...
Himself
Ronnie Kasrils ...
Himself
Sibongile Khumalo ...
Herself
Vusi Mahlasela ...
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Herself
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Himself (archive footage)
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Herself (archive footage)
Hugh Masekela ...
Himself
Sophie Mgcina ...
Herself
Thandi Modise ...
Herself
Sifiso Ntuli ...
Himself
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Storyline

Through a chronological history of the South African liberation struggle, this documentary cites examples of the way that music was used in the fight for freedom. Songs united those who were being oppressed and gave those fighting a way to express their plight. The music consoled those incarcerated, and created an effective underground form of communication inside the prisons. Written by Sujit R. Varma

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Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some images of violence, and for momentary language | See all certifications »
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Details

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6 November 2003 (Australia)  »

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Amandla!  »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$14,181 (USA) (21 February 2003)

Gross:

$398,981 (USA) (2 May 2003)
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User Reviews

 
The True Story of The Black South African Struggle.
22 August 2004 | by (New Zealand) – See all my reviews

The definitive documentary for illustrating the struggle of the black South Africans,as told through the eyes of the White prison guards and executioners, black activists & Musicians. Some of the straight forward comments from the black activists, remain embellished in my mind.

"The train was Africa's first tragedy" (highlighting the need for the large corporates to mobilise the cheap black labour)& "We were treated like s*** and we still never smashed the place up"(showing how much they loved their country) The way in which the townships and their matchbox houses were quickly erected, and then demolished so that the black labour could be moved on to the next corporate project,effectively explains how black labour is no more than a dispensable and renewable chattel, a sort of nomadic feudalism destroying any sense of community. And finally the music which puts to shame the commercialised manufactured dross we hear on today's radio, masquerading as Jazz & Blues.

The superb piece of music towards the end in the dark dingy club,where the female black singer with the haunting pitch delivers the names of those who died in the struggle,would moisten the eyes of the most hardened cynic.

Could the world be in for an explosive treat of Black South African roots, jazz, rhythm and blues music? I hope so.


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