7.4/10
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10 user 38 critic

Amandla! A Revolution in Four Part Harmony (2002)

Interviews, archival footage, and filmed performances highlight the role of music in the South African struggle against apartheid.

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11 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Himself (voice)
F.W. de Klerk ...
Himself (archive footage)
Abdullah Ibrahim ...
Himself
...
Himself (archive footage)
Duma Ka Ndlovu ...
Himself
Ronnie Kasrils ...
Himself
Sibongile Khumalo ...
Herself
Vusi Mahlasela ...
Himself
...
Herself
...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Herself (archive footage)
Hugh Masekela ...
Himself
Sophie Mgcina ...
Herself
Thandi Modise ...
Herself
Sifiso Ntuli ...
Himself
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Storyline

Through a chronological history of the South African liberation struggle, this documentary cites examples of the way that music was used in the fight for freedom. Songs united those who were being oppressed and gave those fighting a way to express their plight. The music consoled those incarcerated, and created an effective underground form of communication inside the prisons. Written by Sujit R. Varma

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Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some images of violence, and for momentary language | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

6 November 2003 (Australia)  »

Also Known As:

Amandla!  »

Filming Locations:


Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$14,181 (USA) (23 February 2003)

Gross:

$398,981 (USA) (4 May 2003)
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User Reviews

 
Great music, great story of justice
14 January 2005 | by (USA) – See all my reviews

The remaining problems of AIDS and poverty in South Africa often overshadow the miracle that happened in the 1990's. This documentary shows you a different side of the story. Musicians of all kinds are shown, with interesting interviews and performances that are moving. I appreciated the way the filmmakers show a considerable amount of music but mix it in with personal narratives. It is fascinating to look at a time period that seems completely past but was so recent that all the involved parties are still alive. Even apartheid era police are interviewed. The musicians also range from charming older women speaking of decades ago to very popular musicians known worldwide. The film does seem to be a bit disorganized at times but it never loses your interest. Other movies about apartheid include Cry Freedom and Cry, the Beloved Country. For DMB fans, there is an interview of Dave Matthews on the DVD as he helped finance this movie.


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