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My Neighbour Totoro theme park announced by Jennie Kermode - 2017-06-03 13:05:34

Happy times for Totoro

A Studio Ghibli theme park centred on fan favourite Totoro has been given the go-ahead in Nagoya prefecture. Announced on Thursday by the studio's Toshio Suzuki, it is expected to open in 2020 on the former World Fair site in Aichi, where versions of the houses from the film My Neighbour Totoro, which were made for the Fair, have been preserved ever since.

Although many fans will be holding out hope for a Catbus ride, Suzuki made clear that rides will not be a big feature of the park, which will instead focus on nature, in keeping with the ecological themes of the film. Visitors will also be able to explore locations from films like Spirited Away and Priincess Mononoke. Everything in the locations will offer full hands-on access, so children can investigate like the characters in the films. Parents will doubtless be relieved if they can avoid soot.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Once Upon A Time: Alessandro Comodin Discusses "Happy Times Will Come Soon"

  • MUBI
The woods hold an unmistakable allure, familiar yet unknown, idyllic, yet fraught with peril. They are the heart of Happy Times Will Come, shot in natural light, which often means that viewers are abandoned in darkness to develop our senses. Indeed, the film thrusts us into the stark indigo night where a pair of fugitives scurrying up a steep hill are long heard before they are seen. Once the sun peeks out, dappling everything in its midst to beguiling effect, it’s not difficult to acclimate to the sights–the crooked crags aside a crisp brook or a verdant curtain of trees. Meanwhile, the young men, peculiarly unplaceable in time, forage for mushrooms or tussle in the high grass. Combining personal history and fabricated folklore, Italian director Alessandro Comodin imbues the alpine setting, already easy on the eyes, with a spectral glow and timelessness. The effect extends to a brief interlude of talking head interviews,
See full article at MUBI »

Emerging Pleasures at New Directors/New Films 2017

  • MUBI
The Summer Is GoneOne of the greater pleasures of New Directors/New Films, the yearly collaboration in New York between the Film Society of Lincoln Center and Museum of Modern Art, is reveling in the mystery of emerging directors. Of course, many and most festivals have offerings from first (and second and third time) directors, but at none is this explicitly the point. When a minimum of information is offered, save for a brief bio, relinquished is the burden of pre-viewing research and any expectations that may arise from it. More prominent titles have been covered by the Notebook already, but here are highlights from around the globe, from directors not-yet-known, though hopefully for not much longer. The Summer Is Gone echoes the ghosts of Edward Yang by locating drama in a particular moment in history, wedding personal histories to political ones. Set in inner Mongolia, the film throws back to the ever-receding 90s,
See full article at MUBI »

‘The Great Wall’ review: Dir. Zhang Yimou (2017)

The Great Wall review: Matt Damon reluctantly helps out a Chinese army in this enjoyable and lavish monster yarn.

The Great Wall review by Luke Ryan Baldock, February 2017.

The Great Wall review

There’s no escaping the PC uproar over Matt Damon’s casting in The Great Wall. It’s been the basis for a sea of unending jokes based around whitewashing. Although whitewashing has been a serious issue for years in Hollywood, Damon’s casting is actually progressive. Being a Chinese/USA co-production that employs a lot of Chinese talent; there are fewer Chinese films with non-Chinese leads, than there are Hollywood films with non-white leads. So let’s celebrate rather than moan. It’s certainly not the same as Tom Cruise taking a lead in The Last Samurai or Tilda Swinton’s divisive casting in Doctor Strange. It’s merely a big budget Chinese/USA co-production that wants to get that Western dollar.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

New Directors/New Films 2017 Line-Up Includes ‘Beach Rats,’ ‘Menashe,’ ‘Lady Macbeth,’ and More

One of the best festivals during the first half of the year is The Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s New Directors/New Films, which kicks off its 46th year this March, running from the 15th to the 26th. With last year’s line-up including some of the year’s best films, including Cameraperson, The Fits, Kaili Blues, Neon Bull, Weiner, and more, we can expect many more discoveries this year.

Opening with Patti Cake$ and closing with Person to Person, in between will be one of our favorite films from Sundance as the centerpiece, Beach Rats. Also among the line-up is a handful of other festival favorites, including The Dreamed Path, The Giant, Menashe, and Lady Macbeth.

“Authenticity is an elusive thing these days, and without it we risk ruin. This is particularly true in cinema,” says Rajendra Roy, the Celeste Bartos Chief
See full article at The Film Stage »

2017 New Directors/New Films Announces Full Lineup, Including ‘Patti Cake$,’ ‘Beach Rats,’ ‘Menashe’ and More

2017 New Directors/New Films Announces Full Lineup, Including ‘Patti Cake$,’ ‘Beach Rats,’ ‘Menashe’ and More
The Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center has today announces their complete lineup for the 46th annual New Directors/New Films (Nd/Nf), running March 15 – 26. Dedicated to the discovery of new works by emerging and dynamic filmmaking talent, this year’s festival will screen 29 features and nine short films. This year’s lineup boasts nine North American premieres, seven U.S. premieres, and two world premieres, with features and shorts from 32 countries across five continents.

The opening, centerpiece, and closing night selections showcase three exciting new voices in American independent cinema that all recently debuted at Sundance: Geremy Jasper’s “Patti Cake$” is the opening night pick, while Eliza Hittman’s “Beach Rats” is the centerpiece selection and Dustin Guy Defa will close the festival with “Person to Person.” Other standouts include “Menashe,” “My Happy Family,” “Quest” and “The Wound.”

Read More: The Sundance Rebel:
See full article at Indiewire »

New Directors/New Films 2017: ‘Patti Cake$,’ ‘Beach Rats,’ ‘Person to Person’ Lead Slate

New Directors/New Films 2017: ‘Patti Cake$,’ ‘Beach Rats,’ ‘Person to Person’ Lead Slate
New Directors/New Films, the annual New York festival of work by emerging filmmakers presented by the Museum of Modern Art and the Film Society of Lincoln Center, has set a 2017 lineup of 29 features and nine shorts that includes Geremy Jasper’s “Patti Cake$,” Eliza Hittman’s “Beach Rats” and Dustin Guy Defa’s “Person to Person” in prominent slots.

Related

Sundance Film Review: ‘Patti Cake$’

All three films premiered earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival. “Patti Cake$,” about a Jersey girl’s quest to become a rapper, will open the festival, while ensemble comedy “Person to Person” — with a cast that includes Abbi Jacobson and Michael Cera — will close it. Brooklyn-set sexual-awakening tale “Beach Rats” screens as the centerpiece.

“Patti Cakes$” turned heads at Sundance when it emerged from the festival with a $9.5 million distribution deal with Fox Searchlight, while new indie label Neon nabbed “Beach Rats.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Vampire Diaries Picture Preview: Who Will Die?

Will Caroline be murdered?

That's one of the more pressing questions as we head in to The Vampire Diaries Season 8 Episode 11. 

Cade is furious about Matt ringing the bell, so he decides that Damon needs to give him 100 souls, or Caroline will be killed. 

How will the rest of the characters feel about that?

Remember you can watch The Vampire Diaries online right here via TV Fanatic. Get caught up now. 

Have a look at the official stills from the episode...

 

1. Cade and Damon - The Vampire Diaries Season 8 Episode 11 Cade and Damon really hate each other, but will they fight? 2. Bonnie Fights Stefan - The Vampire Diaries Season 8 Episode 11 Bonnie is done with Stefan, but will he really try to kill her? 3. We Need To Kill Him! - The Vampire Diaries Season 8 Episode 11 Damon and Caroline will make an alliance to take down Cade, but will they be able
See full article at TVfanatic »

Arte Bows European Online Artekino Festival

Paris– Franco-German net Arte, one of the main financiers of world cinema, has teamed up with the digital service Festival Scope to launch Artekino, a European online festival whose competition lineup will comprise 10 features who have recently premiered at high-profile festivals and markets.

Spanning 44 countries and spearheaded by Arte France Cinema boss Olivier Pere, the festival’s first edition will showcase Ulrich Seidl’s Africa-set trophy hunting documentary “Safari,” Alessandro Comodin’s first fictional feature “Happy Times Will Come Soon,” Nicolette Krebitz’s “Wild,” Albert Serra’s historical drama “La Mort de Louis Xiv,” Joao Nicolau’s Portuguese coming-of-age drama “John From,” Mirjana Karanovic’s “A Good Wife,” Sebastien Laudenbach’s animated tale “La Jeune fille sans mains,” Makis Papadimitriou’s Greek dramedy “Suntan” and Philippe Faucon’s Cesar-winning immigration drama “Fatima.”

“Artekino has chosen 10 films which illustrate the eclecticism and audacity of Europe’s contemporary film production,” said Pere,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Arte, Festival Scope launch pan-European online film festival Artekino

Arte, Festival Scope launch pan-European online film festival Artekino
Line-up includes Edinburgh victor Suntan, The Death Of Louis Xiv and César winner Fatima.

Franco-German broadcaster Arte and Paris-based digital film platform Festival Scope have launched the first edition of a new pan-European, online film festival called Artekino.

Arte has been developing the festival for more than a year-and-a-half, working closely with key partner Festival Scope — which has a long history of overseeing online distribution for festivals and cross-border audiences — as well as international sales agents in the region.

“Arte wanted to promote European cinema in a new way beyond what we already do through our channels and co-productions, putting the emphasis on independent, auteur cinema to spotlight new trends, new talents and even emerging territories,” Olivier Père, managing director of Arte France Cinéma, explained to Screen. “It’s the first festival of its kind focused only on European cinema.”

He added the initiative was also in keeping with Arte’s ambition to expand its digital activities
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes Today: New Talent Emerges

Halfway through the Cannes Film Festival, buzz is hearing about “Jackie”, now in post-production, an account of the days of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in the immediate aftermath of John F. Kennedy's assassination in 1963, directed by Pablo Larraín whose Directors’ Fortnight contender “Neruda” is receiving raves here. Another hot Directors’ Fortnight film “Mean Dreams” with Bill Paxton is praised by one important film buyer as “Mud” meets “Cold in July” in a tense coming-of-age drama about a 15-year-old boy. And Sony Pictures Classics has snatched U.S. rights to the German Competition comedy, “Toni Erdmann”.

This year in the Cannes Film Festival’s Official Competition Section, there are no first time film directors, only established masters, some praised and some panned. However, Cannes Official Un Certain Regard specifically shows emerging filmmakers who are considered to be the next generation of master auteurs of cinema. Out of its 17 films, seven were first features from Romania, France, Israel, USA, Argentina, Finland and the Netherlands. Three of the seven are by women: Stéphanie Di Giusto’s “La Danseuse” (“The Dancer”) is about Loïe Fuller, the toast of the Folies Bergères at the turn of the 20th century and an inspiration for Toulouse-Lautrec and the Lumière Brothers.

Maha Haj From Israel debuted on the first day with “Personal Affairs”, about an old couple in Nazareth and their son and daughter who live on the other side of the border. Other first films are the much-anticipated “The Red Turtle”, a dialogue-free animated feature from Studio Ghibli but made in France and directed by Dutch-born, London-based animator Michael Dudok de Wit, the Finnish-German-Swedish “The Happiest Day In The Life Of Olli Mäki” and Bogdan Mirica’s “Dogs”. The debut So. Korean film, “Train to Busan”, showed in the Official Midnight Screening section and featured a zombie-virus breaking out in South Korea, and a couple of passengers struggling to survive on the train from Seoul to Busan – enough to make me want to stop traveling.

Fool Moon” by France’s Gregoire Leprinr-Foret had a Special Screening within the Official selection and received mixed reviews. In Critics Week, three of ten films selected and judged bycritics as the best films of the year thus far are first features: K. Rajapal’s drama “A Yellow Bird” from Singapore and France about a Singaporean Indian man trying to reconnect with his estranged family after he is released from prison, Mehmet Can Mertoglu’s “Albüm” from Turkey, France and Romania (See the trailer here) and Alessandro Comidin’s “Happy Times Will Come Soon” from Italy. The Acid sidebar of eight very independent features has two first films.

Also noticeable this year is the high number of films co-financed by the Doha Film Institute. Asgaard Farhadi's " The Salesman" will have its world premiere in the Festival’s Official Competition where it competes for the coveted Palme d’Or. “The Salesman” is about a couple who is forced out of their apartment due to dangerous works on a neighboring building. It is one of two Iranian films this year. The other, “Inversion” will play in Un Certain Regard.” Newly established Doha Film Institute lent financial support to two films showing in Un Certain Regard section – “Apprentice” (Singapore, Germany, France, Hong Kong, Qatar) written and directed by Boo Junfeng; and debut feature “Dogs” (Romania, France, Bulgaria, Qatar). Directors’ Fortnight is screens “Divines” (Morocco, France, Qatar) and three Dfi grantee films compete for top honors in the Critics Week: “Mimosas” (Spain, Morocco, France, Qatar) by Oliver Laxe; “Tramontane” (Lebanon, France, UAE, Qatar) by Vatche Boulghourjian; and “Diamond Island” (Cambodia, France, Germany, Qatar) by Davy Chou touted as poetic and beautiful, a part of what might be a Cambodian New Wave. This New Wave from Cambodia is being helped along by the Doha Film Institute whose CEO, Fatma Al Remaihi says:

“At the very core of Dfi’s film funding mandate is to contribute to World Cinema and ensure that great stories continue to be told. These projects will also inspire the young Qatari film professionals to create compelling content that will gain international acclaim.”

Shahrbanoo Sadat’s debut feature “Wolf and Sheep”, in Directors’ Fortnight, is about Sadat herself, who lives in Kabul and Denmark. It takes place in the isolated village in Central Afghanistan where she grew up and where young boys and girls are shepherds. International coproductions are the engine driving the film business today and this one, a Denmark-France-Sweden-Afghanistan coproduction is a prime example. Sadat was spotted previously when her 2011 short “Vice Versa One” screened at Directors’ Fortnight and was invited to develop “Wolf And Sheep” at Cannes Cinefondation Residency in 2010, which mentors emerging talent. Virginie Devesa of the international sales company Alpha Violet picked up the film here in Cannes. Alpha Violet is also selling ”A Yellow Bird” in Critics’ Week and is representing “Luxembourg”, the newest film by Myroslav Slaboshpytskiy, whose first film “The Tribe” played in Sundance and other top fests.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Happy Times Will Come Soon’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Happy Times Will Come Soon’
An inauspicious hole in the ground leads a young woman to a sun-caressed idyll in “Happy Times Will Come Soon,” an elegantly mounted but effortfully cryptic foray into narrative filmmaking from promising Italian docmaker Alessandro Comodin. The audience likewise follows her into a murky warren of mystery, but most viewers are less likely to find their way to the light by the end. Though it’s dreamily lensed (in close-hugging Academy ratio) on 35mm, the snapped-off timelines and disassembled story arcs of this woozy rural fable finally prove less seductive than they are distancing. While it’s easier to surmise Comodin’s creative influences (Miguel Gomes and Lisandro Alonso among them) than it is to pick out his own creative throughline for the film, he’s aiming commendably, complicatedly high: Distributors will demur, while high-arthouse patrons should take his card.

For better or worse, “Happy Times Will Come Soon” is
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Toni Erdmann' racks up key sales for The Match Factory

  • ScreenDaily
'Toni Erdmann' racks up key sales for The Match Factory
Exclusive: UK, Italy, Australia, Spain among a host of key sales on Cannes Competition hit.

The Match Factory has been racking up sales in key territories and around the world for Maren Ade’s critics’ darling and Palme d’Or contender, Toni Erdmann.

The film was picked up by Haut et Court for France and Filmcoopi for Switzerland prior to its Cannes premiere.

After its previously announced sale to North and Latin America (Sony Pictures Classics), the film went to the UK (Soda), Italy (Cinema), Scandinavia (Future), Japan (Bitters End), Spain (Golem), Hong Kong (Edko) Cis (Russian Report), Poland (Gutek), Benelux (September), China (Lemon Tree), Greece (Seven), Portugal (O Som e a Fúria/Alambique), Hungary (Cirko), Taiwan (Swallow Wings), Czech Republic/ Slovakia (Film Europe), Australia (Madman), South Korea (Green Narae) and Turkey (Filmarti).

“The cooperation with Komplizen Film on Toni Erdmann has turned out great in all aspects,” Michael Weber, managing director
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes darling 'Toni Erdmann' racks up key sales for The Match Factory

  • ScreenDaily
Cannes darling 'Toni Erdmann' racks up key sales for The Match Factory
Exclusive: UK, Italy, Australia, Spain among a host of key sales on Cannes Competition hit.

The Match Factory has been racking up sales in key territories and around the world for Maren Ade’s critics’ darling and Palme d’Or contender, Toni Erdmann.

The film was picked up by Haut et Court for France and Filmcoopi for Switzerland prior to its Cannes premiere.

After its previously announced sale to North and Latin America (Sony Pictures Classics), the film went to the UK (Soda), Italy (Cinema), Scandinavia (Future), Japan (Bitters End), Spain (Golem), Hong Kong (Edko) Cis (Russian Report), Poland (Gutek), Benelux (September), China (Lemon Tree), Greece (Seven), Portugal (O Som e a Fúria/Alambique), Hungary (Cirko), Taiwan (Swallow Wings), Czech Republic/ Slovakia (Film Europe), Australia (Madman),South Korea (Green Narae), and Turkey (Filmarti).

“The cooperation with Komplizen Film on Toni Erdmann has turned out great in all aspects,“ Michael Weber, managing director
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Cannes: Critics’ Week Announces 2016 Lineup

Cannes: Critics’ Week Announces 2016 Lineup
There are no American features to be found in Critics’ Week at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, as the parallel section dedicated to first and second films will privilege both European productions and fresh discoveries from such countries as Turkey, Lebanon, Cambodia and Singapore.

The 55th edition of Critics’ Week will kick off on May 12 with Justine Triet’s “In Bed With Victoria,” a light-hearted, frank and modern comedy about a young single mother (played by Virginie Efira) trying to find the balance between her career and her love life.

According to Critics’ Week artistic director Charles Tesson, this sophomore offering from the Cesar-nominated director of “Age of Panic” (which opened in Cannes’ Acid sidebar in 2013) underscores a willingness to shake up the sidebar and marks a change in tone from the typically serious-minded movies that constitute the rest of the section.

The Critics’ Week selection committee sifted through
See full article at Variety - Film News »

We Wish You A Merry Everything

Team Experience is at the Tribeca Film Festival. Here's Jason on Holidays.

In the immortal words of Bela Lugosi what music the children of the night make, turning the Midnight section of the Tribeca Film Festival into my favorite playground at the fest. Happy times with horror friends! So it was with some consternation when I saw this year the fest has given us a smaller swing-set upon which to swing - there are only six films showing under the "Midnight" banner (and it's a stretchto label at least two of them as Horror).

But wait! This year's opening film of the Midnight program is Holidays, an anthology consisting of eight short films (each one about a different celebratory day of the calendar) by eight different directing and writing teams, so I suppose that doubles their numbers, in a way. We'll take what we can get.

And with Holidays what we get,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Italian Film Industry Taking Cannes Snub in Stride

Italian Film Industry Taking Cannes Snub in Stride
Rome — Italy’s film industry is reacting rather nonchalantly to the surprising absence of Italian movies in the Cannes competition for the first time in a decade and taking consolation in the expected presence of a robust contingent of young Italo directors set to screen across the fest’s other sections.

“One year you have three films in competition, the other you don’t have any. It’s normal,” says producer Riccardo Tozzi head of Italian motion picture association Anica.

“It doesn’t mean there aren’t good movies; it just means there aren’t any that fit the Cannes [competition] mold,” he adds.

Of course last year Italy had new works by Cannes regulars Nanni Moretti, Paolo Sorrentino, and Matteo Garrone vying for the Palme d’Or.

This year veteran Italo auteur Marco Bellocchio’s “Sweet Dreams” didn’t make the cut.

“Bellocchio is not a Cannes protege like Nanni Moretti,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Bang Bang Baby,’ ‘Hip Hop-eration’ Win at Santa Barbara Film Festival

‘Bang Bang Baby,’ ‘Hip Hop-eration’ Win at Santa Barbara Film Festival
Bang Bang Baby,” directed by Jeffrey St. Jules, won the Santa Barbara Film Festival’s Spirit Award for Independent Cinema at Saturday’s prize ceremony.

New Zealand’s “Hip Hop-eration,” directed by Bryn Evans, won the Audience Choice Award. The film follows a group of senior citizens on mission to perform at the World Hip Hop Championships in Las Vegas.

Belgium’s “All Cats Are Grey,” directed by Savina Dellicour, won the International Film Award, while the Documentary Award went to “Children of the Arctic,” directed by Nick Brandestini.

Other awards at the 30th edition of the festival went to “Happy Times” with the Nueva Vision Award, “Monument” for best Eastern European Film and “Holbrook/Twain: An American Odyssey” with the Santa Barbara Features award.

Additional awards include live action short film under 30 Minutes to “The Answers,” animation short film to “Load,” documentary short to “Life After Pi” and the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘McFarland USA’ To Close Santa Barbara Film Festival: Full Lineup

  • Deadline
The Santa Barbara International Film Festival has unveiled its 2015 line-up which includes films representing 54 countries, 23 world premieres and 53 U.S. premieres. The U.S. premiere of Niki Caro’s McFarland USA will close out the 30th fest. Based on the 1987 true story and starring Kevin Costner and Maria Bello, the film follows novice runners from McFarland, an economically challenged town in California’s farm-rich Central Valley, as they give their all to build a cross-country team under the direction of Coach Jim White (Costner), a newcomer to their predominantly Latino high school. The unlikely band of runners overcomes the odds to forge not only a championship cross-country team but an enduring legacy as well.

The festival runs from January 27-February 7.

Below is the list of World and U.S. Premiere films followed by the list of titles by sidebar categories.

World Premieres

A Better You, USA

Directed by Matt Walsh

Cast: Brian Huskey,
See full article at Deadline »

'McFarland, USA' will close out 30th annual Santa Barbara Film Festival

  • Hitfix
'McFarland, USA' will close out 30th annual Santa Barbara Film Festival
A self-acknowledged "showcase for Academy Award frontrunners," the Santa Barbara International Film Festival is often overlooked for the actual films that earn it festival status. An amalgamation of international discoveries and ’merica’s circuit highlights, the Sbiff curates a week of best-of-the-best to pair with their star-praising. The 2015 edition offers another expansive selection, bookended by two films that aren’t on any radars just yet. Sbiff will open with "Desert Dancer," producer Richard Raymond’s directorial debut. Starring Reece Ritchie and Frieda Pinto, the drama follows a group of friends who wave off the harsh political climate of Iran’s 2009 presidential election in favor of forming a dance team, picking up moves from Michael Jackson, Gene Kelly and Rudolf Nureyev thanks to the magic of YouTube. The festival will close with "McFarland, USA," starring Kevin Costner and Maria Bello. Telling the 1987 true story of a Latino high school’s underdog cross-country team,
See full article at Hitfix »
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