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(2002)

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Fests from American Indian Film Festival to Winter Film Awards Celebrate Differences and Diversity

Global gatherings celebrate cultures, ethnicities and people from all walks of life. Variety has compiled a list of these notable upcoming festivals for the 2017-18 year.

American Indian Film Festival

As the “oldest and best known” Native American cinema outlet, the Aiff aims to increase mainstream awareness of Native American cinema, develop an audience, and create authentic representations of native peoples in cinema. Nov. 3-11

Asian World Film Festival

The Los Angeles-based fest showcases films from 50 countries across Asia and aims to create better recognition for its filmmakers and strengthen the Asian film market. All films selected to represent their country at the Academy and Hollywood Foreign Press Assn. awards are automatically invited to be exhibited and have an opportunity to display their films to Oscar, Golden Globes and guild voters. Oct. 25-Nov. 2

Atlanta Jewish Film Festival

In 2015 Ajff became the largest Jewish film festival in the world; now it continues to showcase international cinema through a Jewish
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Lean on Pete’ Review: Andrew Haigh’s Horse Starts Quick, Then Fades | Venice 2017

Indie movie characters who live in the Pacific Northwest are most often depicted as pioneers in modern times, losing themselves in the wilderness and constantly trying to reinvent themselves, never asking anyone for help. This has been explored by Gus Van Sant from his very first film, Mala Noche and comes back whenever Van Sant gets the itch to return to his indie roots after a studio film, like in Elephant, Gerry, Paranoid Park and Last Days. The newest Northwest indie darling, Kelly Reichardt, has similarly used small moments to explore this delicate evergreen unraveling from Old Joy through Certain …
See full article at Collider.com »

Football betting tips courtesy of the movies

The film world has often been attracted to the world of gambling and sports betting in particular. From gambling in the likes of Casino, Martin Scorsese’s award-winning Casino back in 1995 to poker action with Matt Damon in the exceptional Rounders three years later in 1998, cinema is infatuated with betting.

One thing that it hasn’t touched up that much is sports betting, and in particular soccer betting, but it has shown up in a couple of films in recent memory. The first is the Matthew McConaughey and Al Pacino film Two For The Money. The film is written by Dan Gilroy, who would later go on to make the Jake Gyllenhaal movie Nightcrawler, and was directed by D.J. Caruso (xXx: Return Of Xander Cage). McCounaghey played the part of Brandon, a college American Football star who was forced into an early retirement by a life-changing injury. After the accident,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Ridley Scott to Direct Getty Kidnapping Drama; Natalie Portman May Star

Ridley Scott to Direct Getty Kidnapping Drama; Natalie Portman May Star
Ridley Scott is directing kidnap drama “All the Money in the World” with Sony handling worldwide distribution.

The story, written by David Scarpa, centers on the 1973 kidnap in Italy of J. Paul Getty III — the rebellious teenage grandson of oil billionaire J. Paul Getty, who was reluctant to pay the $17 million ransom demanded by the kidnappers. Natalie Portman is being eyed to play the part of Gail Harris, the mother of John Paul Getty III.

The kidnappers sent a lock of hair and the teen’s severed right ear to the family to convince them pay the ransom. Harris and the boy’s father eventually convinced the elder Gerry pay a $2.9 million ransom, resulting in the teenager being freed after six months. He had been chained to a stake in a cave in Italy.

The film is being produced and financed by Imperative Entertainment. Producers are Imperative’s Dan Friedkin and Bradley Thomas; Ridley Scott,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Casey Affleck Predicted He’d Never Win an Oscar and Hillary Clinton Would Be President

Casey Affleck Predicted He’d Never Win an Oscar and Hillary Clinton Would Be President
Casey Affleck, who won the best actor Oscar on Sunday, became a frontrunner after he swept a series of precursor awards last winter. But when he started doing press for “Manchester by the Sea” in the fall, Affleck was certain he’d never win an Academy Award.

For a cover story in October, here’s what he told Variety about the early Oscar buzz.

“I think other than the campaigning and the stuff that happens, there’s another factor, which is you are the kind of person who has had years and years of doing magazines and talk shows and being out there,” said Affleck, who spent two decades making under-the-radar indies like “Gerry” and “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints.” “That is what makes the big difference. You are the kind of person that the Academy voters feel like they know. I haven’t led that kind of life. And
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Matt Damon vs. Ben Affleck: Film Critics Are Forced to Pick a Favorite — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
Matt Damon vs. Ben Affleck: Film Critics Are Forced to Pick a Favorite — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

From “School Ties” to “Live By Night” and this weekend’s “The Great Wall,” Ben Affleck and Matt Damon have each — for better and worse — left a considerable and ever-increasing footprint in the cultural landscape. But while the world is wide enough for both of them, our hearts are not. And so, we forced our panel of critics to choose: Ben Affleck or Matt Damon?

There can be only one.

Charles Bramesco (@intothecrevasse), Freelance with Rolling Stone, Vulture, Vox

This is a toughie. In terms of looks, both Matt Damon and Ben Affleck’s faces remind me of between forty and fifty of my least-favorite classmates during
See full article at Indiewire »

‘I Am Michael’ Trailer: James Franco Stars as a Gay Activist Who Rejects Homosexuality

  • Indiewire
‘I Am Michael’ Trailer: James Franco Stars as a Gay Activist Who Rejects Homosexuality
In 2011, Benoit Denizet-Lewis published an article in the New York Times Magazine entitled “My Ex-Gay Friend,” about Michael Glatze, a former gay activist and co-founder of the Young Gay America magazine who eventually denounced homosexuality after a health scare. Now, Justin Kelly’s new film “I Am Michael” tells Glatze’s story as he transforms from an openly gay man spouting queer theory to rejecting his whole personal identity. James Franco (“127 Hours”) stars as Glatze alongside Zachary Quinto (“Star Trek Beyond”) as Glatze’s former boyfriend and Emma Roberts (“Palo Alto”) as a young Christian woman who falls for Glatze. Watch a trailer for the film below.

Read More: Sundance Review: James Franco Excels in ‘I Am Michael,’ a Provocative Look at ‘Ex-Gay’ Activist Michael Glatze

The film is executive produced by Gus Van Sant. His previous films include “Drugstore Cowboy,” “My Own Private Idaho,” “Gerry,” “Elephant” and most recently,
See full article at Indiewire »

Casey Affleck to Receive the Desert Palm Achievement Award

Casey Affleck is being honored at the upcoming Palm Springs International Film Festival for his fantastic performance in Kenneth Lonergan's "Manchester by the Sea!" I sat down with Affleck and his co-star, Michelle Williams, for the movie at the Toronto International Film Festival. Take a look at my interview:

And here's the full press release from the Palm Springs International Film Festival:

Palm Springs, CA (November 11, 2016) . The 28th annual Palm Springs International Film Festival (Psiff) will present Casey Affleck with the Desert Palm Achievement Casey AffleckAward, Actor at its annual Film Awards Gala for his performance in Manchester By the Sea. Each year the festival selects an actor and actress to receive this award. The Film AwardsGala, hosted by Mary Hart, will be held Monday, January 2 at the Palm Springs Convention Center. The Festival runs January 2-16.

.Casey Affleck delivers his finest performance in Manchester By the Sea, playing
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

Gus Van Sant on Making ‘To Die For’ and ‘Good Will Hunting’ With Casey Affleck

Gus Van Sant on Making ‘To Die For’ and ‘Good Will Hunting’ With Casey Affleck
Director Gus Van Sant gave Casey Affleck his first acting job at 19—as one of the high school students Nicole Kidman seduces in “To Die For”—and they later became friends that collaborated on “Good Will Hunting” and “Gerry.” For this week’s cover story on Affleck and his performance in “Manchester by the Sea,” Van Sant talked to Variety about working with the actor, now 41, over the years.

To Die For” (1995): “It was set in New Hampshire, and the Boston accent was semi-accurate to the area. It was actually Matt Damon who had come in for an interview about the role of Jimmy [later played by Joaquin Phoenix], and he said that we should meet. Casey just seemed really great for the character of Russel. There were a couple things about not casting Matt. He was older. The character was 16, and Matt was 23. And also, Matt was very all-American looking and the character
See full article at Variety - Film News »

How Casey Affleck Found the Role of a Lifetime in ‘Manchester by the Sea’

How Casey Affleck Found the Role of a Lifetime in ‘Manchester by the Sea’
The last person who’d ever want to watch a Casey Affleck movie is Casey Affleck. “I don’t like it, in the way you don’t like hearing your own voice on the machine,” Affleck says over a long lunch in a vegan restaurant in West Hollywood. The conversation starts with routine chitchat but twists at this revelation: Affleck hasn’t seen many of his big-screen appearances, including “The Finest Hours” (in which he plays the engineer of a sinking ship), “Triple 9” (a cop), “The Killer Inside Me” (a sociopath), the Eddie Murphy comedy “Tower Heist” (a concierge), or even Christopher Nolan’s “Interstellar” (the brother). “It’s a bummer,” Affleck says, “because I like Nolan, and I love science fiction. But I didn’t want to watch that.”

On a Saturday afternoon last January, Affleck broke his own rule when he quietly slid into an aisle seat
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Desierto’ Review: Donald Trump’s Campaign Makes This Violent Thriller More Engaging Than It Looks

‘Desierto’ Review: Donald Trump’s Campaign Makes This Violent Thriller More Engaging Than It Looks
Give “Desierto” credit for this: There has never been a more appropriate time for a tense thriller about Mexican immigrants avoiding the murderous advances of a gun-wielding American lunatic. Released a little over a year after Donald Trump labeled the majority of undocumented Mexicans living in the U.S. as drug-dealing rapists in the same breath as announcing his presidency, the first feature from director Jonas Cuarón (the son of “Gravity” director Alfonso, with whom the younger Cuarón wrote the screenplay) doesn’t deliver much in the way of ingenuity. But it’s baked in a topical kind of dread.

Desierto” takes the form of a minimalist B-movie, spending only a modicum of time setting up the premise before settling into the prolonged cat-and-mouth dynamic that dominates the story. After a handful of Mexicans assemble on the outskirts of the U.S. border, surrounded by barren desert, their transit hits
See full article at Indiewire »

Casey Affleck Set To Direct Light Of My Life

It’s been six years since Casey Affleck attempted to fool the world with I’m Still Here – the infamous mockumentary in which Joaquin Phoenix retired from acting to become a rap artist. Since then, he has developed a number of potential new projects to helm, but Light Of My Life is seemingly the first to reach the point of becoming a real movie.

Being so early in the process, there are few details to be found on the project. What is known is that Affleck will be directing from his own script, and will also star as a father trapped in the woods with his young daughter in a ‘post-pandemic’ kind of situation. This makes Light Of My Life more of a survival movie, but with an interesting pedigree.

While, in terms of dramatic performances, Affleck certainly does seem to favour narratives of the more bleak persuasion (The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford
See full article at We Got This Covered »

A Fine Pair And The Limits Of Claudia Love

This fall semester I started taking an Italian language class two evenings a week with my daughter, and Thursday night I was looking to decompress after our first big quiz. (Scores haven’t been revealed yet, but I think we did just fine.) So I started rummaging through my shelves and came across the Warner Archives DVD of Francesco Maselli’s A Fine Pair (1968), an ostensibly breezy romantic caper comedy which reteams Rock Hudson and Claudia Cardinale, a pairing their public was presumably clamoring for after their previous outing together in Blindfold (1965), a Universal programmer written and directed by Phillip Dunne, the screenwriter of, among many other notable movies, How Green Was My Valley. I’ve had a mad crush on Claudia ever since I first saw her in Circus World (1964) with John Wayne when I was but a youngster, and I always welcome the chance to visit movies of
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Casey Affleck on ‘Manchester’ Melancholy, Scoring a Telluride Tribute

Casey Affleck on ‘Manchester’ Melancholy, Scoring a Telluride Tribute
Telluride, Colo. — “Oh, well, it’s about time,” Casey Affleck jokingly exclaims when asked about receiving a tribute from the Telluride Film Festival this year. In truth, he confides, it’s a bit embarrassing for him.

But he’s too modest. He’s actually a natural selection for the festival, which has a tendency to eschew “lifetime achievement” territory with some of its tributes, opting for artists who might be in the prime of their career, or even, at times, in its early stages.

Ostensibly, though, the celebration is an excuse to drum up attention for Affleck’s performance in Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea,” a withdrawn, breathtakingly internalized piece of work that could land him his second Academy Award nomination to date.

On the eve of the festival, Affleck sat down to discuss the film with Variety.

***

You’ve collaborated with Kenneth Lonergan on a number of theater projects and now,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Casey Affleck’s Career-Spanning Q&A: How Lessons from Gus Van Sant, Joaquin Phoenix and More Led To ‘Manchester’

Casey Affleck’s Career-Spanning Q&A: How Lessons from Gus Van Sant, Joaquin Phoenix and More Led To ‘Manchester’
At 41, Casey Affleck still has the air of a young man, but he’s hardly a newcomer. Once primarily known as the younger brother of movie star Ben, the Massachusetts native has paved his own path. With prominent roles in idiosyncratic American indies ranging from Gus Van Sant’s “Gerry” to “Lonesome Jim,” Affleck carved out a niche with his fragile, unassuming screen presence and the flashes of intensity that occasionally broke through. Those attributes have served him well in roles as diverse as his unsettling psychopathic turn in Michael Winterbottom’s “The Killer Inside Me” to Andrew Dominik’s poetic western “The Assassination of Jesse James By the Coward Robert Ford,” which landed Affleck his first Oscar nomination.

See More‘Manchester By The Sea’ Trailer: Discover Why Kenneth Lonergan’s Acclaimed Indie Is A Major Oscar Frontrunner

Now he’s back on the awards circuit with “Manchester By the Sea,
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Mimosas’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Mimosas’
Mimosas,” the second feature from Morocco-based director Oliver Laxe, won the Nespresso Grand Prize at this year’s Cannes Critics’ Week, and Nespresso isn’t a terrible idea for anyone who walks in without preparation for this minimalist travelogue and crypto-Western, which offers relatively few clues to its goals and intents. Still, those familiar with the ethnographic works of Ben Rivers (who gets a thanks in the closing credits) and the films of Argentine director Lisandro Alonso (“Jauja”) will find much to admire in the movie’s combination of spiritual musings and stunning landscapes. Favoring longueurs by design, it is a decidedly noncommercial project that asks to be taken or left on its own terms.

Laxe’s first feature, “You All Are Captains” (which showed in Directors’ Fortnight in 2010), combined fiction and documentary elements, and he has said that “Mimosas” was inspired by his own travels with Saïd Aagli, who
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Critic's Notebook: Gus Van Sant Gets His Moment at the Cinematheque Francaise

Critic's Notebook: Gus Van Sant Gets His Moment at the Cinematheque Francaise
With 16 features in a career spanning over 30 years, Gus Van Sant remains one of the biggest anomalies in contemporary American cinema. After all, how can one director be responsible for such diverse films as the minimalist masterpiece Gerry (2002), the Sean Connery tearjerker Finding Forrester (2000) and a shot-for-shot remake of Psycho (1998), which is clearly the most bizarre narrative experiment to ever star Vince Vaughn? (Not counting the “rats” monologue from Season 2 of True Detective.) Van Sant is behind some of the more influential independent films of the last three decades, first with

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Watch: Matthew McConaughey Wants To Die In First International Trailer For Gus Van Sant's ‘The Sea Of Trees’

The Cannes Film Festival is known for being the home for some spectacular flops over the years, and last spring, that honor went to Gus Van Sant's "The Sea Trees." Oliver Lyttelton said it “mixes the thrills of ‘Gerry’ with the subtlety of ‘Finding Forrester’ and the originality of the ‘Psycho’ redo,” which is to say, it's not very good, and it's not a big surprise the movie was kept off the festival circuit after that. Read More: New Photos Of Matthew McConaughey, Ken Watanabe, And Naomi Watts In Gus Van Sant's 'Sea Of Trees' Starring Matthew McConaughey, Ken Watanabe, and Naomi Watts, the movie follows a suicidal American on his way to die in the the dense Aokigahara forest near Mt. Fuji, who befriends a Japanese man lost in the woods, and the two search for a way out. Here's the synopsis from Cannes: Arthur Brennan (McConaughey) treks into Aokigahara,
See full article at The Playlist »

Team America: World Police

Trey Parker and Matt Stone's 'outrageous, irreverent' comedy is the gusher of pointless profanity and smut that will cheer the myriad fans of South Park. The ultimate message of this cringe-worthy spectacle is that liberals are dupes and traitors, foreigners are either evil or morons, and kicking ass around the world is our national birthright. Go team! Team America: World Police Blu-ray Warner /Paramount 2004 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 98 min. / Street Date October 13, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 9.98 Starring voices of Trey Parker, Matt Stone, others. Cinematography Bill Pope Film Editor Thomas M. Vogt Original Music Harry Gregson-Williams Written by Trey Parker, Matt Stone, Pam Brady Produced by Trey Parker, Scott Rudin, Matt Stone Directed by Trey Parker    

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Team America: World Police looks like a show designed for the kids, yet it's too raw for most adults. It is an optimal feature concept for Trey Parker and Matt Stone,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Matthew McConaughey & Gus Van Sant Don’t Care That Everyone Hated ‘Sea Of Trees’,’ Made Some Lincoln Ads Together

Not alright, alright, alright. That was more or less the universal reception to “Sea Of Trees,” Gus Van Sant’s drama starring Matthew McConaughey, Naomi Watts, and Ken Watanabe, when it premiered at Cannes this year. Much anticipated, given its prestigious Competition slot, McConaughey’s recent hot run, and Van Sant’s Palme d’Or-winning track record, the film bowed back in May to a chorus of boos, and has been notably absent from the fall festivals, and the release calendar. Following McConaughey’s depression-stricken American to Japan’s famous "suicide forest," where he meets a similarly distraught Japanese businessman, our review said that the film “mixes the thrills of ‘Gerry’ with the subtlety of ‘Finding Forrester’ and the originality of the ‘Psycho’ redo,” and that the title was appropriate, because “it makes you feel like you’re drowning, and it’s full of sap.” But the reaction doesn’t
See full article at The Playlist »
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